Tag Archives: reveal

The Beatles: Ringo Starr recalls the bitter joke George Harrison made on … | Instant News


18 January 2021, 17:10

Ringo Starr revealed the last extraordinary thing George Harrison said to him on his deathbed in a 2011 documentary.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


Ringo Starr recalled the last words his good friend and fellow Beatle George Harrison had spoken to him in his last days at his home in Switzerland, before his death on November 30, 2001.

Ringo Starr reveal the last thing Beatles‘star George Harrison said to him on his deathbed, and it was so moving.

In footage taken from Martin Scorsese’s documentary George Harrison: Living in a Material World, Ringo Starr shared what was said on his last visit to the Beatle star’s home in Switzerland.

The Beatle had surgery for throat cancer in 1998 and was treated for lung cancer and brain tumors not long before his death in 2001.

In footage taken from George Harrison's Martin Scorsese documentary: Living in the Material World, Ringo Starr reveals what was said on his last visit to the Beatle star's home in Switzerland.

In footage taken from George Harrison’s Martin Scorsese documentary: Living in the Material World, Ringo Starr reveals what was said on his last visit to the Beatle star’s home in Switzerland.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


George Harrison underwent surgery for throat cancer in 1998 and was treated for lung cancer and brain tumor shortly before his death in 2001. Photo, Ringo Starr.

George Harrison underwent surgery for throat cancer in 1998 and was treated for lung cancer and brain tumor shortly before his death in 2001. Photo, Ringo Starr.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


Ringo Starr remember going to see George just before traveling to Boston to see his daughter, who had a brain tumor.

“The last weeks of George’s life, he was in Switzerland, and I went to see him, and he was very sick,” Ringo explained, “you know, he can only lie down.”

“And when she was sick and I came to see her, I went to Boston, because my daughter has a brain tumor.

“And I said, ‘Well, you know, I have to go, I have to go to Boston’ and he … Phew, those were the last words I heard him say,” Ringo said, clearly moved. in memory.

“Actually … and he said, ‘Do you want me to come with you?'”

“The last weeks of George’s life, he was in Switzerland, and I went to see him, and he was very sick,” explained Ringo, “you know, he can only lie down.”.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


“Those were the last words I heard him say,” said Ringo, moved clearly as he reminisced about his last time with George Harrison.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


“Oh, God,” he added, emotionally as he told the story. “So, you know, that’s the extraordinary side of George …”

George Harrison: Living in a Material World was released in 2011 and features archival footage, home videos, and in-depth interviews with people close to the star, including Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Phil Spector, and Pattie Boyd.

George HarrisonWife Olivia, who collaborated on the film, said at the release she “almost didn’t want people to see it. It’s like showing everyone your most private place.”

George was the lead guitarist for The Beatles and wrote some of the band’s best-loved songs including ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ and ‘Something’.

“He left this world while he was living in it, God-conscious, unafraid of death, and at peace, surrounded by family and friends,” the Harrisons said in a statement. Photograph, George and Ringo in 1964.

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The star died at the age of 58 of lung cancer on November 30, 2001.

He was in Los Angeles, where he was traveling for his last days, and obeyed The New York TimesHis wife, Olivia, and son, Dhani, 24, were with him when he died at the home of Gavin De Becker, an old friend.

“He left this world while he was living in it, God-conscious, unafraid of death, and at peace, surrounded by family and friends,” the Harrisons said in a statement. “She used to say, ‘Everything can wait but the search for God can’t wait,’ and ‘love one another’.”

The video came later Paul McCartney recently said in an interview on NPR All things considered that he liked communicating with George Harrison via the large coniferous tree that Beatle gave him before his death.

Paul McCartney recently said in an interview on NPR's All Things Consider that he loved communicating with George Harrison through the large coniferous tree that Beatle gave him before his death.  Photograph, Paul and George in 1965.

Paul McCartney recently said in an interview on NPR’s All Things Consider that he loved communicating with George Harrison through the large coniferous tree that Beatle gave him before his death. Photograph, Paul and George in 1965.

Picture:
Getty


The Beatles photographed in 1966. (Left to Right) Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon.

The Beatles photographed in 1966. (Left to Right) Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon.

Picture:
Getty


“George is very fond of horticulture, [he was] a really good gardener, “said Paul.” He gave me [the] tree as a gift. It was a big spruce and near my gate. “

“When I left my house [on the morning of Dec. 18], I got out of the car and closed the gate and looked up at the tree and said, ‘Hi, George,’ “McCartney detailed.” There he is, growing strong … It brings me back to the time when I hitched a ride with him! [George and John Lennon still have] an ever-present presence. “

McCartney continues: “It was beautiful. He gave it to me, so I just planted it. But then, as time went by, every time I saw it, I said, ‘That’s the tree George gave me.’ George had put it in a tree for me. I hope he’s happy with that. “

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Revealed: McDonald’s reveals what actually goes into the fan-favorite Chicken McNugget | Instant News


Lifestyle

McDonald’s has opened the veil of what’s actually one of the menu’s favorite items: chicken nuggets.

And no, there is no sign of the chicken’s beak, legs, claws, viscera or cartilage interfering with it.

The Herald was invited behind the scenes at the Ingham factory in South Auckland to see how Chicken McNuggets are made – a first in New Zealand.

They are made with 100 percent chicken breast meat, with a little skin, and flavor.

Factory manager Issac Flynn said the manufacturing process begins with delivery of the breasts and is checked to make sure there are no bruises or bloodstains.

These are then chopped together, then combined in a brine mixture, before being formed into one of four shapes – bone, bell, boot and ball.

The nuggets are made at the Golden Arches Place south of Auckland.  Photo / Alex Burton
The nuggets are made at the Golden Arches Place south of Auckland. Photo / Alex Burton

The nuggets that have been printed are then subjected to a beating process, quick fried, frozen quickly, weighed, bagged, and packed before being sent to the restaurant.

Usually they process about 20 tonnes of McNuggets, that means about 1.3 million per day.

The PR attack comes after years of speculation about what got into McNugget, from pieces of chicken and pink slime.

McDonald’s wants to show that when you take a bite of a McNugget, that’s not true.

Stubborn rumors have been circulating on social media for years, including food chains that use worm meat and other burger fillers on their menus.

The pink slime video went viral online, and Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has even claimed it is the main ingredient.

However, that was not the case. At least, not when the Herald visited the factory on Wednesday morning when only chicken breast was used.

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Flynn is teased and asked time and time again about the beak, legs and claws, but she can assure visitors that nothing bad is hidden in your favorite chicken recipe.

It happened when McDonald’s offered Kiwis one million free McNuggets for just one day.

McDonald’s committed to a pending pledge during the Covid-19 health and safety requirements in August.

Nugget lovers can only get a free six-pack package if they download the McDonald’s app and exchange digital vouchers in-store or on drive-thru.

The McNuggets first appeared in New Zealand in 1985 and McDonald’s managing director Dave Howse said they wanted to give back to the Kiwi after 35 years of supporting sales of chicken nuggets.

Nothing but chicken is used to make nuggets, despite popular belief.  Photos / Files
Nothing but chicken is used to make nuggets, despite popular belief. Photos / Files

“It became clear during the lockdown that Chicken McNuggets were the company’s favorite so we decided to shout out a six-pack Kiwi and celebrate 35 years of love for them.

“We are proud of our longstanding supplier relationship, and offer Kiwi Chicken McNuggets raised in our own backyard.”

More than 140 million Chicken McNuggets were consumed by Kiwis in 2019.

McDonald’s annual chicken orders are the equivalent of more than 3.75 million tonnes, all of which are raised by 30 farmers based in the Waikato region.

Some nuggets about McNuggets:

• Chicken McNuggets were first offered on menus in New Zealand in 1985;

• Chicken McNuggets come in four shapes – bone, bell, boot and ball;

• Rene Arend, McDonald’s first executive chef, created the Chicken McNugget recipe in 1979;

• In America, Chicken McNugget dips are available in seven varieties, including Sweet ‘n Sour and BBQ options available in New Zealand;

• Szechuan Sauce is McDonald’s most sought after limited-edition dipping sauce. Released in New Zealand early 2020, the sauce runs out in multiple restaurants within hours.

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Karachi: Investigations reveal the defendant was released on bail involved in funding ISIS – Pakistan | Instant News


Published in 12 January 2021 5:00 p.m.

Karachi: Investigations reveal the defendants were released on bail for involvement in ISIS funding

KARACHI (Dunya News) – The Counter-Terrorism Department has registered a case regarding funding for the ISIS terrorist organization from Karachi. The defendant was released on bail due to lack of evidence.

Omar bin Khalid was arrested in December 2020 from Tariq Street in Karachi, said the Counter-Terrorism Department (CTD) source. However, because there was no evidence against the defendant, he was released on bail against a personal guarantee.

Sources said that two cell phones were seized from the possession of defendant Omar bin Khalid and sent for forensics. The digital forensic report found evidence against the accused and his accomplices. The defendants Junaid’s accomplice, Zia and Owais were also named in the case.

Investigations revealed shockingly that the defendants were in contact with ISIS terrorists and their families in Syria and Pakistan.

The defendant used to fund ISIS in various ways. Funding is used for terrorist activities in Syria and possibly Pakistan.
CTD officials hope that the defendant will be tried soon.

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NZ scientists are pushing closer to revealing the role of genes in Parkinson’s disease | Instant News


Despite decades of research, and its impact on one in 500 New Zealanders and millions more worldwide, Parkinson’s disease remains a medical mystery. Photo / 123RF

Kiwi scientists are trying to get closer to revealing the important role one gene plays in the development of Parkinson’s disease.

A new study comes after research in New Zealand, supported by the charity of world-renowned Hollywood star Michael J Fox, sheds light on the fascinating link of the gene to the notorious neurodegenerative condition.

Parkinson’s is a progressive neurodegenerative condition caused by a lack of dopamine in the brain, resulting in slow and awkward movements.

Despite decades of research, and its impact on one in 500 New Zealanders and millions more worldwide, the disease remains a medical mystery.

Doctors don’t yet know why most people develop it and for those who are diagnosed, there is no cure.

Associate Professor Justin O'Sullivan from the University of Auckland's Liggins Institute led the research team.  Photo / Provided
Associate Professor Justin O’Sullivan from the University of Auckland’s Liggins Institute led the research team. Photo / Provided

Over the past few years, scientists have been pursuing promising new clues in the genetic mutation that is one of the biggest risk factors for the disease.

The specific gene involved is called acid beta glucoserebrosidase, or GBA.

Research has shown how GBA mutations inhibit enzymes that help clear out damaged or excess parts of cells, before they can build up to cause the damage seen in Parkinson’s disease.

Last August, a team led by Associate Professor Justin O’Sullivan, from the University of Auckland-based Liggins Institute, published findings that pinpoint the specific components of GBA that play a major role in regulating and delaying the onset of disease.

In the “non-coding” area of ​​GBA – once thought of as aimless “junk” DNA – the team screened 128 sites to find that, where the gene happened to have a specific combination of three short non-coding DNA sequences, Parkinson’s onset could be delayed by five. year.

They also identified six other non-coding regions that act as switches to control how the GBA gene is turned on or off in the brain’s movement and cognitive centers.

Scientists – funded in part by the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research – are also creating maps showing how such switches affect other genes – apart from GBA – throughout the human body.

In the new study, supported by New Zealand’s Marsden Fund, O’Sullivan will work with University of Otago geneticist Professor Martin Kennedy to further explore the GBA puzzle.

Kennedy said the project proved to be an “accidental amalgamation” of initially separate research.

A large charity founded by famous Parkinson's sufferer, Michael J Fox, is putting money into research in New Zealand.  Photo / Wikimedia
A large charity founded by famous Parkinson’s sufferer, Michael J Fox, is putting money into research in New Zealand. Photo / Wikimedia

While O’Sullivan has focused on how gene expression is regulated in different cells, Kennedy and PhD student Oscar Graham has developed a new DNA sequencing method to check for mutations in the GBA gene.

When O’Sullivan and Kennedy sat together at the Queenstown conference to share their work, they realized what they could learn by putting it together.

“When put together, the two data sets show that not only clear mutations in GBA, but also a natural pattern of subtle variations in GBA genes, appear to impact Parkinson’s disease,” said Kennedy.

In addition, this may occur through changing the expression of perhaps 20 to 30 other genes.

Their joint study, which also involved the NZ Brain Research Institute’s renowned clinical director, Professor Tim Anderson, ultimately sought to confirm that subtle genetic changes in GBA do affect Parkinson’s early age.

But they also wanted to know why so many people who carry the GBA mutation don’t develop the disease.

Furthermore, they aim to build simpler ways of detecting variation so that it can be tested in larger studies, along with sophisticated new models exploring its effects in cell biology.

The team plans to import specific stem cells taken from Parkinson’s patients, which will be modified in the laboratory using the latest gene editing methods to provide cells with various forms of the GBA gene.

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“These cells can be differentiated in the laboratory into different cell types, such as certain brain cells, then we can see differences in gene expression due to the presence of different forms of the GBA gene,” explains Kennedy.

“Then we’ll set up experiments to better understand the biological impact of differences in expression of any gene, both in cultured cell models, and ultimately in humans.”

Kennedy expects this pioneering research to come up with challenges – particularly around modifying genes in cell lines, but also in understanding what the differences in gene expression caused by different forms of GBA actually mean.

“Until we discover those changes and start thinking about gene function, we won’t be able to plan proper experiments to answer the key questions of this research.”

But if successful, their research may prove important for ongoing efforts to understand and prevent Parkinson’s.

“GBA is the single biggest genetic factor we know of that underlies Parkinson’s, but we don’t really understand how it exerts its effects,” said Kennedy.

“In addition, drugs are being developed and piloted that target the GBA and its lines of operation, so it is increasingly important to understand all the how and why of the GBA.

“We believe our genetic work will lead to a better ability to predict Parkinson’s risk – and possibly allow targeting of treatment, or even prevention for people at high genetic risk who don’t already have it.”

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Spy: Meet the new Lexie Brown Bachelorette | Instant News


Entertainment

Meet the new Lexie Brown Bachelorette. Video / TVNZ

New Zealand’s New Bacherlorette has been revealed.

Lexie Brown, 31, is a brand and marketing manager from Wellington, whose international career has focused on hospitality.

She will appear in the upcoming third series on tvNZ 2.

Brown tells the Spy that he has never used a dating app nor will you know him through his social media.

“You’ll only know me if you know me in real life,” said Brown.

Brown returned from living in Canada last year and said he originally proposed to appear on the show as a joke – telling the casting team he desperately needed a sperm donor.

Only when he heard back did he take the show as a serious dating option.
“Imagine if I actually found my man? On a bloody dating reality TV show – what are the odds?”

Of the 18 single candidates who will be announced soon, Brown is looking for the “laid back” Kiwi guy. If they wanted to impress their father, they could bring the hog home from hunting.

“It will truly be a roller coaster ride with lots of laughter. I can’t wait to share it with New Zealand,” said Brown.

Host, Art Green, who has hosted successive series Bachelorette after winning the first version of The Bachelor, described Brown as the type of woman who likes to be adventurous.

“He’s independent, travels a lot, is family-oriented, and smart,” said Green.

“You can look forward to lots of laughter, some amazing dates, some great changes (some that I don’t even see coming) and hopefully a true love story,” he said.

Green, who is expecting a second child with wife Matilda, said he will look more relaxed this season when the roses are being distributed after learning the ropes of hosting season one. He said he enjoyed the show more by being himself, rather than trying to imitate other hosts.

The show first started filming during the Covid restriction level so there would be no international travel. Instead expect to see dating on some of NZ’s best romantic getaways.

Meanwhile, Eric Watson’s former mansion in Karaka, Te Hihi Plantation, is once again a bachelor house.

Brown’s Instagram handle is MissLexieBrown – but she hopes it will turn out to be “Madam”.

“If at the end of all this, I go out with someone I feel I can live with, then that’s really a win,” he said.

“But if not, at least I’m having fun with some great people.”

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