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Liberals began to break their promises to buy back ‘all’ assault weapons in Canada | Instant News


Gun shop employee Matt displays the WK180-C, an assault weapon made in Canada by Kodiak Defense Inc., at the three-day Tactical and Competitive Shooting Sports Exhibition in Mississauga, on September 6, 2019.

J. P. MOCZULSKI / The Globe and Mail

The Liberal Government has resumed its election promise to buy back “all” military-style assault rifles in Canada, choosing instead to allow current owners to sell their weapons to the government or to store them under the grandfather process, federal officials said.

This step is set to enrage both parties from the arms control debate, which has been polarized over the prohibition of looming a number of semi-automatic weapons.

The partial repurchase program is the latest example from the Canadian Liberal Party which promised strict weapons control measures during elections and then resigned in government.

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Canada sets out to ban attack style weapons, including AR-15s and weapons used in the Polytechnique massacre

Under grandfather, the sale of new weapons will be stopped, but the current owner will be allowed to keep weapons that are prohibited at home under certain conditions. Broad details of the repurchase program were provided by federal officials, which The Globe and Mail did not identify because they were not authorized to speak openly about the matter.

Alison de Groot, from the Canadian Sports Arms and Ammunition Association, said the buyback program was partly “bad public policy” and unreasonable.

“This is totally ineffective and a waste of taxpayers’ money,” he said. “Canada won’t be safer.”

Nathalie Provost, who was hit by four bullets during the 1989 École Polytechnique massacre that killed 14 women, said partial repurchases were another disappointment in her 30 years of struggle to control weapons. He said he understood the logistical difficulties of a full repurchase, but blamed the situation on a series of failures by successive governments to impose strong weapons control measures.

He specifically criticized the abolition of most of the 2012 long-term registration under the previous Harper administration.

“I am very angry, you cannot imagine,” said Provost, who is part of a weapons control group called Poly Remembers.

As previously reported by The Globe, the federal government implemented its election promise to ban military-style assault rifles in Canada. Federal officials say the government has adopted a list of nine banned weapons in Canada, including firearms such as AR-15, Mini-14 Ruger and Hurricane Beretta CX4 which have been used in mass shootings, in Canada or abroad.

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Temporary list recommended

prohibited firearms

Estimated number in Canada

M16, M4, AR-10, AR-15

Sandy Hook, New Zealand,

Las Vegas, Orlando

Beretta CX4 Storm

Dawson University

Weapons with muzzle energy above 10,000 joules

MURAT YÜKSELIR / GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: CANADA GOVERNMENT

Temporary list recommended

prohibited firearms

Estimated number in Canada

M16, M4, AR-10, AR-15

Sandy Hook, New Zealand,

Las Vegas, Orlando

Beretta CX4 Storm

Dawson University

Weapons with muzzle energy above 10,000 joules

MURAT YÜKSELIR / GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: CANADA GOVERNMENT

Temporary list of recommended forbidden firearms

Estimated number in Canada

M16, M4, AR-10, AR-15

Sandy Hook, New Zealand,

Las Vegas, Orlando

Beretta CX4 Storm

Dawson University

Weapons with muzzle energy above 10,000 joules

MURAT YÜKSELIR / GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: CANADIAN GOVERNMENT

The ban, which has been made through a cabinet decision, will be announced and put in place immediately.

The government hopes that banning nine platforms and their variants will scoop up nearly 1,500 different models in the country, with a total of tens of thousands of individual firearms.

In addition to the nine platforms, bans are expected to be placed on weapons with a muzzle energy exceeding 10,000 joules, which will ensnare .50-caliber sniper rifles, and who have caliber more than 20 millimeters, rare-level firearms that include several grenade launchers.

“Those are the only two reasonable restrictions,” said A.J. Somerset, writer Weapons: Culture and Creed Weapons and former cannon instructor with the Canadian Forces. “They are trying to ban things around specifications. Pursuing an individual model perpetuates the same failed approach. “

Somerset said that banning certain models resembled the push in the 1990s to crack down on semi-automatic assault rifles under then prime minister Jean Chrétien. Rather than passing comprehensive legislation, the government was trying to stamp out “military-style assault weapons” by identifying weapons models through council orders.

According to the RCMP briefing notes, the order-in-council is intended to be constantly updated when new weapons arrive on the Canadian market. For the most part, that never happened and weapons manufacturers easily switched production to firearm models that avoided regulations.

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“Once they ban one model, another model will become popular – it’s a hard hit,” said Alan Voth, a weapons forensic consultant and retired RCMP firearms analyst.

Voth said the 1990s ban made Canada’s classification system so complicated that regional RCMP forensic laboratories often disagreed with one another about how certain firearm models should be classified. The government finally focused its classification task in Ottawa, in part to overcome regional differences.

Unlike upcoming bans on special attack style weapons, repurchase programs, and further weapons control measures being prepared by Ottawa, need to be enforced through new laws and are only scheduled to take effect next year. It is still unclear how much the repurchase program costs, but Ms. de Groot said that Liberals “underestimated” the costs when they gave a $ 250 million price tag during the election.

In a statement, Conservative MP Pierre Paul-Hus accused the government of using “direct emotions” from the recent mass shootings in Nova Scotia to “make major policy changes” such as a ban on assault weapons. The NDP and the Quebec Bloc both said they supported a ban on assault weapons.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau defended the ban on Thursday, explaining his government was almost ready to introduce weapons control measures when Parliament suspended its routine activities in March because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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