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Labor Day weekend toll roads: The death toll on New Zealand’s roads surpasses 2019 | Instant News


Three people have died on the streets of New Zealand this holiday period. Photo / Daniel Hines

Three people have died on New Zealand’s streets since Labor weekend began, topping last year’s toll over the entire holiday period.

One person died after an accident near Gisborne last night on Whatatutu Rd, Te Karaka, at around 2am.

And a motorcyclist died after a serious accident around 5 pm on Main Rd North (State Highway 2), Timberlea, Upper Hutt, yesterday.

Police also revealed that one person died after the collision of two cars on Tekapo-Twizel Rd (SH8) about 3 km west of the city of Danau Tekapo.

Three people in the second car were transported to hospital with minor injuries. The accident happened at around 9am.

Roads are blocked and motorists must anticipate long delays. An alternative route is via Waimate to Kurow. The police did not know the injury status of those involved.

One person, a motorcyclist, died during last year’s Labor Day weekend, according to Transportation Ministry data.

The weekend period starts at 4pm yesterday and lasts until 6am on Tuesdays.

Police said investigations were underway regarding the Te Karaka and Timberlea accidents.

New Zealand Acting Police Superintendent Gini Welch said buckling your seat belts and driving at a safe speed are two “must do” things for safe holiday travel.

“This is our first long weekend since June, and with travel restricted to our own backyard, there will be more traffic on our roads. More traffic means more risk, only with sheer volume.

“You’re on vacation; there’s no need to rush.”

Toll road this year

The number of toll roads during the year between January 1 and October 22 was 251, lower than last year’s 271 deaths in the same period.

A total of 121 drivers have died, more than any other type of road user this year.

The number of men who have died far exceeds the number of women who have died on our roads – 183 to 68.

The 60+ age group had the most deaths overall at 71.

During Labor weekend 2018, there were four fatal accidents and 130 injury accidents reported, resulting in five deaths, 33 serious injuries and 155 minor injuries.

The five victims who died were two drivers, two passengers and a motorbike rider.

“More than half [53 per cent] of the accident occurred on an urban road, “the ministry’s website said of the 2018 crash.

“Forty percent of accidents were one-vehicle accidents in which the driver lost control or ran off the road, 28 percent were intersections, 10 percent occurred in the back or collision with a barrier collision, and 5 percent were head-on collisions.”

“The most frequently cited causal factors during Labor weekend were poor position on the road (28 percent), loss of control (22 percent), traveling too fast for certain conditions (21 percent), failing to make way or stopping (20 percent). , and alcohol and drugs (14 percent). “

There was no record of injuries as of Labor weekend 2019.

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Labor Day weekend toll roads: The death toll on New Zealand’s roads surpasses 2019 | Instant News


Three people have died on the streets of New Zealand this holiday period. Photo / Daniel Hines

Three people have died on New Zealand’s streets since Labor weekend began, topping last year’s toll over the entire holiday period.

One person died after an accident near Gisborne last night on Whatatutu Rd, Te Karaka, at around 2am.

And a motorcyclist died after a serious accident around 5 pm on Main Rd North (State Highway 2), Timberlea, Upper Hutt, yesterday.

Police also revealed that one person died after the collision of two cars on Tekapo-Twizel Rd (SH8) about 3 km west of the city of Danau Tekapo.

Three people in the second car were transported to hospital with minor injuries. The accident happened at around 9am.

Roads are blocked and motorists must anticipate long delays. An alternative route is via Waimate to Kurow. The police did not know the injury status of those involved.

One person, a motorcyclist, died during last year’s Labor Day weekend, according to Transportation Ministry data.

The weekend period starts at 4pm yesterday and lasts until 6am on Tuesdays.

Police said investigations were underway regarding the Te Karaka and Timberlea accidents.

New Zealand Acting Police Superintendent Gini Welch said buckling your seat belts and driving at a safe speed are two “must do” things for safe holiday travel.

“This is our first long weekend since June, and with travel restricted to our own backyard, there will be more traffic on our roads. More traffic means more risk, only with sheer volume.

“You’re on vacation; there’s no need to rush.”

Toll road this year

The number of toll roads during the year between January 1 and October 22 was 251, lower than last year’s 271 deaths in the same period.

A total of 121 drivers have died, more than any other type of road user this year.

The number of men who have died far exceeds the number of women who have died on our roads – 183 to 68.

The 60+ age group had the most deaths overall at 71.

During Labor weekend 2018, there were four fatal accidents and 130 injury accidents reported, resulting in five deaths, 33 serious injuries and 155 minor injuries.

The five victims who died were two drivers, two passengers and a motorbike rider.

“More than half [53 per cent] of the accident occurred on an urban road, “the ministry’s website said of the 2018 crash.

“Forty percent of accidents were one-vehicle accidents in which the driver lost control or ran off the road, 28 percent were intersections, 10 percent occurred in the back or collision with a barrier collision, and 5 percent were head-on collisions.”

“The most frequently cited causal factors during Labor weekend were poor position on the road (28 percent), loss of control (22 percent), traveling too fast for certain conditions (21 percent), failing to make way or stopping (20 percent). , and alcohol and drugs (14 percent). “

There was no record of injuries as of Labor weekend 2019.

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Germany topped 5,000 new COVID-19 cases every day for the first time since April | Instant News


Germany has recorded more than 5,000 coronavirus cases in a 24-hour period for the first time since April, said the country’s national disease control agency.

Figures released on Wednesday by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) showed that 5,132 new infections had been recorded, an increase of more than 1,000 compared with 4,122 on Tuesday.

On Saturday, 4,721 new cases were reported, the previous highest tally since April.

A total of 334,585 cases have been registered since the start of the pandemic and a total of 9,677 people have died in Germany after contracting the coronavirus, up 43 from the previous day.

A week ago the health authorities reported 2,828 new infections to the RKI.

But now, the figure is back to the same level in mid-April but still below the peaks reached at the peak of the pandemic in late March and early April, when Germany counted more than 6,000 new cases per day.

However, far more tests are being performed now than ever before this year – and thus more infections are being detected.

Warning about the current situation, the RKI wrote: “There are urgent calls for the entire population to commit to infection control.”

Although the number of coronavirus patients in intensive care units has increased markedly in recent days, the numbers remain relatively low. According to data from the DIVI Intensive Care Register on Tuesday, around 620 COVID-19 patients are receiving intensive care, compared with around 450 in the previous week.

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Italy topped 4,000 daily cases of COVID-19 for the first time since mid-April | Instant News


Italy has registered 4,458 new coronavirus infections over the past 24 hours, the health ministry said on Thursday, the first time it had surpassed 4,000 cases in one day since mid-April.

There were also 22 COVID-related deaths on Thursday compared to the previous 31 days – far fewer than the peak of the pandemic in Italy in March and April.

Italy is the first country in Europe to catch COVID-19 and has the continent’s second-highest death toll, with 36,083 people having died since the outbreak flared up in February, according to official figures.

Thanks to one of the tightest lockdowns in the world, the government managed to contain contagion in the summer, but new infections have risen over the past three months and are now rising strongly.

They increased by about 1,000 on Wednesday, when there were more than 3,000 daily cases for the first time since April 24.

Italy still records significantly fewer daily cases than some of the other major European countries, such as France, Spain and the UK.

The last time Italy saw more than 4,000 cases a day was April 12, with 4,092 infections reported about a month before the government allowed restaurants, bars and shops to reopen. On the same day, 431 people died.

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Germany experienced the highest daily increase in coronavirus cases since April | Instant News


Germany has once again set a new record in the increase in coronavirus infections over the one-day period, as fears grow that the country may lose its grip on the pandemic as the colder months approach.

The Robert Koch Institute, the national body for disease control, said 2,673 more cases had been confirmed as of Friday, the highest daily increase seen since the second half of April. Eight more people died after contracting the virus, bringing the death toll to 9,503.

At the peak of the pandemic in late March and early April, Germany counted more than 6,000 new cases per day. The country has gradually lifted the lockdown since May, as authorities opted for a strategy of contact tracing and local restrictions in response to a regional outbreak.

Meanwhile, masks are ubiquitous on public transport and in shops. Germans were also encouraged to keep windows open, as summer was coming to an end and socialization was starting to move indoors.

“The hard times, fall and winter, are yet to come,” Chancellor Angela Merkel said earlier this week.

The number of people in Germany planning to travel in the second half of 2020 has fallen dramatically, with only one in five planning a trip – 8% abroad and 12% in Germany, according to a YouGov study commissioned by the German Press Agency (dpa ).

Last year, 41% planned a trip during that period: 23% overseas and 18% within Germany. Two-thirds of people surveyed in a representative survey said they plan to stay home this fall and winter, while 8% are still in doubt. And there are big question marks during the German festive period in December, with many companies canceling their Christmas parties and the country’s famous Christmas market considering strict hygiene measures or even canceled seasons.

“This year the number of Christmas parties at most companies has dropped to zero,” said Bernd Fritzges, head of industry body VDVO which represents about 600 event planners in the country. There are concerns about its effect on small and medium-sized businesses.

Restrictions imposed to slow the spread of the virus in March plunged Europe’s largest economy into recession, with gross domestic product (GDP) currently not expected to return to pre-crisis levels until 2022.

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