Tag Archives: synthetic biology

Science Advisory Board | Instant News


Science Advisory Board<br />

COVID-19 has long-term effects on the biotechnology industry

January 5, 2021 – The COVID-19 pandemic will have far-reaching and lasting effects on the biotechnology industry, according to speakers at a January 5 presentation held ahead of the virtual Biotech Showcase being held on January 11-15. Biotech companies have been swirling around on a large scale pursuing infectious disease research – and not all of them will succeed.
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An allergic reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine should not stop vaccination

January 4, 2021 – The COVID-19 vaccine currently approved for emergency use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is safe even among people with food or drug allergies, according to allergists from Massachusetts General Hospital. A review of all relevant information is published on Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice on December 31st.
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Top 10 ScienceBoard stories for 2020

21 December 2020 – For many of us, 2020 didn’t go according to plan. The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed our daily lives. Right here at ScienceBoard.net, we have provided our readers with timely and evidence-based information regarding COVID-19, as well as many other topics in the biopharmaceutical and life sciences industry.
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The FDA issued the EUA for the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

18 December 2020 – Just one day after the committee’s favorable recommendation, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine from Moderna. The company’s mRNA-1273 vaccine is now the second COVID-19 vaccine on the US market, after vaccines from Pfizer and BioNTech were administered EUA last week.
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New discoveries could produce broad-spectrum antivirals

18 December 2020 – Scientists have identified key human genes that cells need to consume and destroy viruses. Research results are published in Natural on December 16 and could demonstrate new treatments to target viral infections, including COVID-19.
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The FDA committee voted in favor of the Moderna COVID-19 EUA vaccine

17 December 2020 – Moderna’s COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273, received favorable recommendations on December 17 from an advisory committee for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The OK Committee means that mRNA-1273 may receive emergency use authorization (EUA) within a few days.
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The new immunotherapy supports the polio vaccine to treat cancer

17 December 2020 – As if we needed another reason to get vaccinated, researchers have developed technology that uses the polio vaccine to help treat cancer in those who later develop the disease. The technology, developed at Duke University and developed by Istari Oncology, uses the antigen produced by the polio vaccine to trigger the immune system to eat away at targeted cancer cells.
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The genes provide new targets for COVID-19 therapy

15 December 2020 – Genes associated with antiviral immunity and lung inflammation have been linked to severe cases of COVID-19 in a new genome analysis carried out in the UK. The result, published in Natural on December 11, revealed new therapeutic targets for drug reuse and development efforts.
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Global health R&D has stalled as resources shifted to COVID-19

December 14, 2020 – The current coronavirus pandemic has slowed progress in research and development (R&D) on neglected diseases and other long-term global health challenges by disrupting ongoing research and directing resources to the work of COVID-19, according to a new report released on December 11. by the nonprofit Global Health Technologies Coalition.
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The FDA issued the EUA for Pfizer’s vaccine, BioNTech COVID-19

12 December 2020 – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. This step comes after the FDA’s Vaccines and Biological Products Advisory Committee issued positive recommendations for the vaccine.

Google’s DeepMind is making a quantum leap in solving the problem of protein folding

11 December 2020 – Artificial intelligence has made breakthroughs in protein structure prediction. The results come as part of the 14th Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction, a friendly contest and conference organized by the Protein Structure Prediction Center with sponsorship from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of the US National Institutes of Health.
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Science Advisory Board | Instant News


Science Advisory Board<br />

The FDA committee voted in favor of the Moderna COVID-19 EUA vaccine

17 December 2020 – Moderna’s COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273, today received favorable recommendations from the advisory committee for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The OK Committee means that mRNA-1273 may receive emergency use authorization (EUA) within a few days.
Discuss

The new immunotherapy supports the polio vaccine to treat cancer

17 December 2020 – As if we needed another reason to get vaccinated, researchers have developed technology that uses the polio vaccine to help treat cancer in those who later develop the disease. The technology, developed at Duke University and developed by Istari Oncology, uses the antigen produced by the polio vaccine to trigger the immune system to eat away at targeted cancer cells.
Discuss

The genes provide new targets for COVID-19 therapy

15 December 2020 – Genes linked to antiviral immunity and lung inflammation have been linked to severe cases of COVID-19 in a new genome analysis carried out in the UK. The result, published in Natural on December 11, revealed new therapeutic targets for drug reuse and development efforts.
Discuss

Global health R&D has stalled as resources shifted to COVID-19

December 14, 2020 – The current coronavirus pandemic has slowed progress in research and development (R&D) on neglected diseases and other long-term global health challenges by disrupting ongoing research and directing resources to the work of COVID-19, according to a new report released on December 11. by the nonprofit Global Health Technologies Coalition.
Discuss

The FDA issued the EUA for Pfizer’s vaccine, BioNTech COVID-19

12 December 2020 – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. This step comes after the FDA’s Vaccines and Biological Products Advisory Committee issued positive recommendations for the vaccine.

Google’s DeepMind is making a quantum leap in solving the problem of protein folding

11 December 2020 – Artificial intelligence has made breakthroughs in protein structure prediction. The results come as part of the 14th Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction, a friendly contest and conference organized by the Protein Structure Prediction Center with sponsorship from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of the US National Institutes of Health.
Discuss

The FDA committee approved the transfer of Pfizer, the BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to EUA

December 10, 2020 – Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate, BNT162b2, passed an important milestone today when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee determined that the candidate’s benefits in preventing COVID-19 outweigh the risks. The committee’s advice is likely to lead to the issuance of an emergency use authorization (EUA) for vaccines by the FDA within days.
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The new study found the SARS-CoV-2 antibodies disappeared rapidly

8 December 2020 – Antibodies developed after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus disappeared rapidly, according to an analysis published in Immunology Science on December 7th. These findings may suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection may not offer long-term immunity from subsequent reinfection with the virus.
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The new universal flu vaccine targets conserved areas of viral surface proteins

December 7, 2020 – A new universal influenza vaccine has been developed that targets the surface protein stem of the influenza virus rather than the head. This vaccine, which is capable of neutralizing various strains of influenza, was evaluated in a phase I clinical study whose results were published in Natural Medicine on December 7th.
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Regulatory Roundup: The appointment is made before the end of the year

December 7, 2020 – This week’s Regulatory Roundup covers activities from November 30 to December 4 and is filled with breakthroughs, orphans, and rare disease appointments from the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. Several cancer, immunotherapy, and vaccine companies also submitted biological licensing applications to advance their candidates.
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Fishcakes in Space? How One Biotech Startup Ferries Food Away | Instant News


With everything happening in the world today, you might be jealous of NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley for leaving Planet Earth in May on a rocket ship. Well, your chance to leave may come sooner than you think: The successful launch of SpaceX brings commercial space travel a little closer to reality. As technology advances, humans tend to spend more time in space.

But one complicated problem persists: sending goods into space is very expensive – around $ 10,000 per pound. Space dwellers need to find ways to make their own food. But in the void of space, how will we “live from the land?”

Emeryville, based in CA Food without end think it has the answer: grow fish flesh in space … without fish. And they have shown it is possible, raising hopes not only for space colonization, but also for sustainable and cultured food on Earth.

Harvesting from animals versus laboratory

On September 8, 2017, Finless Foods made history by producing the first fish – grown outside of fish – to be eaten. A select number of people were invited to try fish cakes made with cultured fish cells.

Finless Foods was founded by Mike Selden and Brian Wyrwas, who respectively served as CEO and CSO. They both are biochemists and molecular biologists through training, and they founded Finless Foods with a mission to bring sustainable, delicious and ethical seafood to the world. The company uses cellular biology to grow seafood – without fish.

“Fish is one of the healthiest sources of protein on the planet,” Selden said, “but more than 90% of the world’s fisheries are overexploited or simply exhausted.” As more people turn to fish as part of a nutritious diet, he said, the problem will only get worse. “We are taking the first step into a world where everyone has access to fresh, healthy, delicious and sustainable seafood.”

You may have heard the terms “cultivated meat” or “laboratory meat.” These terms may not sound appetizing, but consumers and investors alike see the potential of companies like Finless Foods, Memphis meat, Clara Foods, Only, Perfect day, and Wild Earth, to name a few, in making high-quality sustainable foods using the latest techniques in a new field called cellular agriculture.

Cell farming is something like ordinary farming, but instead of harvesting fruit, vegetables, or meat, you are harvesting cells. Companies can use biology to grow food such as meat cells and milk protein from cell culture in environments such as laboratories. This high-tech process eliminates the need to use livestock to get the same product. Cellular agriculture promises to offer a more sustainable and humane alternative to the current livestock farming system.

And in space, where there are no cows or chickens, cellular farming might be just for dinner.

So long, and thanks for all the fish

As if making fish cakes from several fish cells is not enough, Finless Foods also shows the potential of cellular agriculture in human efforts to explore space. Last year, they sent fish muscle cells to the International Space Station in collaboration with Russian and mission 3D Bioprinting Solution, which provides 3D bioprinter. The team was able to grow cells to a certain density, then use bioprinter to arrange fish cells into 3D structures, forming small cell spheres – the first step to shape them into something that resembles food that we already know and like.

You might think, “Why does all this happen in space?” Now, if colonization will be possible in space, we need to be independent and grow food on location. The average tuna weighs 20 pounds, costing around $ 200,000 to send it into space. And it’s problematic to have a fish tank in space, where water is very valuable and gravity is lacking.

Instead, imagine being able to send cells of many varieties (chicken, beef, fish, your choice), along with equipment and nutrients to grow cells in place. Not only will this be more cost-effective, sustainable and human, it will also be faster.

But growing seafood in outer space is not Finless Foods’ primary mission. They want to make cultured seafood available to everyone on Earth.

Challenges and opportunities in cultured meat

One of the challenges with cultivated meat is to imitate the natural structure of the product. Growing outside animals, cultured cells do not gather as usual. This challenge is something Finless Foods wants to solve. They continue to collaborate with the 3D Bioprinting Solution and hope to get their own bioprinter for further experiments in their own lab in the California Bay Area.

Will we eat cultured meat in the future? Selden thinks there is no doubt about that.

“Agriculture is an important part of the way the world works,” he said. “It’s at the crossroads of many different ways in which the world needs to change. Food justice, malnutrition, environmental justice, and cruelty to animals … These are great levers that we can push and change to make the world better. ”

Selden said that our oceans are at their carrying capacity and that we are currently capturing everything we can get out of the ocean every year. “We cannot increase this number,” he said. While fish farming does solve some of the problems of sustainability, he said not all fish can be maintained. In addition, the demand for seafood is increasing. “Fish farming has not yet moved human seafood consumption out of the ocean,” Selden claims.

“With our system, we can not only make these fish that cannot be farmed, but we can also scale up quickly. If you start fish farming, it takes at least two years before you can produce fish. In our system, our cells double every 24 hours, meaning our growth is exponential. Farms don’t. We see this as a way to improve to meet global seafood demand in a far more efficient way. “Selden said.

The best fish first

One of the main fish that Finless Foods is working on is giant bluefin tuna. Often used in sushi and sashimi, bluefin tuna is caught from the ocean and is not suitable for fish farming, making it an excellent candidate for cultured seafood. Finless Foods also works on sea urchins, eels and pufferfish.

Cultured seafood is not yet available in the market. But soon after, I couldn’t wait to try the cultured blue fin sashimi.

Follow me on Twitter at @johncumbers and @synbiobeta. Subscribe to my weekly newsletter on synthetic biology. Thanks to Stephanie Michelsen for additional research and reporting in this article. I am the founder SynBioBeta, and some of the companies that I write about – including Finless Foods – are sponsors from SynBioBeta Conference and weekly digest. Here’s a complete list of SynBioBeta sponsors.

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Founder of Apple Zoom-Bombs Meeting Thanking COVID-19 Scientists | Instant News


Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple with Steve Jobs, thinks he has coronavirus. His search for this test revealed the progress we had made – and the work that needed to be done.

Apple’s devices aren’t infected with viruses – but it seems Apple’s founders did. In December 2019, Steve Wozniak and his wife Janet sailed in Southeast Asia. They returned to their home in California in early January with an annoying cough.

“We had the worst experience you can imagine,” Steve then said. Their disease starts in the throat but quickly develops into a severe lower respiratory tract infection with a “seizure” cough. On January 13, Janet was taken by ambulance to the hospital. “They did every test they could – everything they knew – and they found nothing,” Steve said. At that time, there were no tests for COVID-19 available in the US. Another person on the same cruise ship returned to Europe and was later tested positive for COVID-19. Frustrated with their mysterious illness, the first Wozniaks talk to Sanjay Gupta from CNN about their testing problem.

Tech, meet bio

I first met Steve Wozniak when he was the main speaker SynBioBeta, my annual conference organizes all things synthetic biology. Woz, as he was well known, agreed to talk with a biotech audience about his rich experience at the forefront of different technologies: Together with Steve Jobs, Woz pioneered personal computers, and proved that digital technology can have more than a stuffy impact. business life.

This week, I have another opportunity to talk with Woz and Janet. The couple surprised the audience a virtual SynBioBeta town hall that I organized on the topic of COVID-19 antibody research. They extend thanks to a small army of biomedical scientists who have worked to help explain their disease – and develop antibody drugs.

Antibodies are one of the most promising therapies for COVID-19. This natural immune molecule is the body’s frontline weapon in the fight against viruses. The right antibodies can stop virus particles in their paths, and even mark them for destruction in the body. Currently, researchers around the world are racing to identify natural antibodies that block SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19. Some even work to engineer such drugs from the start.

After recovering and consulting with their doctors, Woz and Janet wanted to donate blood samples to a laboratory that was working on diagnoses for the new corona virus. They realize that they are in a unique position: Given their time and location, and their striking symptoms, they suspect that they might be among the first Americans who were sick with COVID-19. Sharing their blood can help advance science, including antibody research.

The first specialist Wozniaks reached was Trevor Martin, CEO of Mammoth Bioscience, a proposed Bay Area company CRISPR to detect new coronavirus. Martin connected them Charles Chiu, an infectious disease doctor who directs the virus diagnostic center at the University of California, San Francisco. Simultaneously, Woz also sent blood samples to Stanford University for traditional coronavirus testing. The results returned negative, which made Woz and Janet surprised rather than relieved.

“We have all the symptoms of the corona virus, and we have never been so sick in our entire lives,” Janet told me. Could they be fed up with the primordial strain of the new corona virus? Does the test give false negatives? They want to push further.

I contacted Wozniaks UCSF Professor Joe DeRisi, who is also the co-director of Chan Zuckerberg BioHub, A The $ 600 million center is funded by CEO and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan.

DeRisi is developing a new panel to detect antibodies against various viruses at once. The research utilizes a new instrument called Beacon, made by another Bay Area company called, Berkeley lightsthat I’ve written about before. The machine filters human cells to identify cells that produce antibodies that help. “Not only can we help Woz and Janet now, but we have a long-term plan to launch these machines globally so that wherever future pandemics emerge, there is a connected Beacon network that can find the right antibodies immediately and avoid other pandemics. . If we have antibodies now, we can all get back to work, “said Eric Hobbs, CEO of Berkeley Lights. At the time of this writing, the results of the Wozniak blood analysis are still pending.

I also connected Wozniaks to James Crowe, director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center and an expert on viral immunity. In mid-March, James looked for blood donors who thought they might have the virus in late December or early January because of the time it took for the human body to develop antibodies against the new virus. A number of initiatives are now emerging to collect plasma from survivors, such as Plasma Alliance fund Facebook group for COVID-19 who survived.

Crowe’s analysis showed that Wozniak’s blood samples, which were collected after they recovered, did not contain antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2. “The spike protein we use [for testing] actually from the Wuhan strain that originally occurred in China, which we consider to be potentially one exposure. [The Wozniaks] has antibodies for the coronavirus internal protein, but not for the Wuhan strain, “Crowe shared.

If Crowe’s analysis determines conclusively that Wozniak really captured COVID-19, they “would be the first known case in the United States,” Crowe said during the town hall. “Case 1 in the US was identified in Seattle – that’s what we know. But I bet there are other individuals traveling in Asia who come to the US which is actually the first real case. “Crowe made this statement just days before new reporting revealed that the previous death of COVID-19 occurred in Santa Clara County, California.

The need for more – and better – testing

Wozniak’s story highlights the urgent need for widespread COVID-19 testing. With new diagnostic technology being used, epidemiologists can track the history of viruses and end the lockdown that is enforced by the world.

To reopen our economy, said DeRisi, we need massive testing on both sides. The first and most obvious is to identify who is infected and therefore spread the virus. The second, however, will require the registration of large numbers of people who have recovered from COVID-19 so that they can be monitored for long-lasting immunity. No one knows whether those who recover can be infected again. If they are invulnerable, how long will that protection last? Only a few months of antibody testing in large populations can reveal this important information, according to DiRisi.

“Listening to Zoom calls is the best I have felt about coronavirus since we started hearing it on a cruise in December, because there are so many smart scientists handling this pandemic,” Janet said. “I just feel we will solve this problem.”

Follow me on Twitter at @johncumbers and @synbiobeta. Subscribe to my weekly newsletter at synthetic biology.

Thanks to Ian Haydon and for additional research and reporting in this article. I am the founder SynBioBeta, and some of the companies that I write about – including Mammoth Biosciences – are sponsors of SynBioBeta Conference and weekly digest This is a complete list of SynBioBeta sponsors.

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