Tag Archives: the Covid-19 pandemic

Australian Olympics prepare for the Tokyo Olympics like no other | Buffalo Sports | Instant News


SYDNEY (AP) – Australian athletes are preparing for a match like no other when the Tokyo Olympics kicks off on 23 July – 100 days from Wednesday.

Among other pandemic restrictions in Tokyo, the Olympics will have no family or friends watching them live in Japan, they will arrive and leave within days of their competition and their movement outside the Olympic Village will be restricted.

“They know that this is going to be a very different game, and not having family and friends is certainly disappointing to a lot of people,” Australian chef de mission Ian Chesterman said Wednesday.

The Tokyo Olympics were postponed a year after coronavirus travel restrictions made it impossible to hold them in 2020.

“We are doing everything in our power to get the team to and from matches safely and, of course, to give them every opportunity to look their best when that moment comes,” added Chesterman.

Australia plans to send 450 to 480 athletes and about 1,000 support staff to Tokyo. Most of them have not been vaccinated against COVID-19, and that could hamper athletes’ plans to compete internationally ahead of matches.

“We are in discussion with the office of Minister (Health) (Greg) Hunt every week,” AOC chief executive Matt Carroll said Wednesday. “We didn’t expect athletes or officials to be vaccinated at this time, so we weren’t frustrated. The time of crisis starts next month, because athletes will start going abroad. The government is well aware of that. “

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Swiss program plans a post-COVID future for science, diplomacy | World | Instant News


By JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press

GENEVA (AP) – With COVID-19, space exploration and climate change coming to the attention of many, the so-called “do tank” in Geneva, financed by the Swiss government, is gearing up to develop long-term scientific projects, ranging from global courts to disputes. scientific efforts for the Manhattan Project’s style to clean excess carbon from the atmosphere.

Supporters of the Geneva Science and Diplomacy Anticipator want to bridge the image of the Swiss city as a conflict resolution center with visionary scientific ambitions on big-picture issues, including the future of humanity.

First created in late 2019, GESDA presented its first activity report on Tuesday and announced plans for a summit in October that will bring together hundreds of United Nations officials, Nobel laureates, academics, diplomats, representatives of advocacy groups and members of the public.

Supporters of this initiative include the heads of top universities in Switzerland and the world’s largest atomic destroyer, which is located at the European nuclear research organization CERN. They said the coronavirus pandemic has provided science with an invisible platform for decades and wanted to draw on the attention of the public health crisis that has claimed nearly 3 million lives and devastated the economy to encourage thinking about the interaction between science, politics and society.

Peter Brabeck, former chairman and CEO of Nestle who was appointed by the Swiss government to lead GESDA, uses COVID-19 as an example of how prior planning can help prevent future health crises, noting that the mRNA vaccine technology used now to fight the pandemic has been around for a decade.

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Swiss program plans a post-COVID future for science, diplomacy | World | Instant News


By JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press

GENEVA (AP) – With COVID-19, space exploration and climate change coming to the attention of many, the so-called “do tank” in Geneva, financed by the Swiss government, is gearing up to develop long-term scientific projects, ranging from global courts to disputes. scientific efforts for the Manhattan Project’s style to clean excess carbon from the atmosphere.

Supporters of the Geneva Science and Diplomacy Anticipator want to bridge the image of the Swiss city as a conflict resolution center with visionary scientific ambitions on big-picture issues, including the future of humanity.

First created in late 2019, GESDA presented its first activity report on Tuesday and announced plans for a summit in October that will bring together hundreds of United Nations officials, Nobel laureates, academics, diplomats, representatives of advocacy groups and members of the public.

Supporters of this initiative include the heads of top universities in Switzerland and the world’s largest atomic destroyer, which is located at the European nuclear research organization CERN. They said the coronavirus pandemic has provided science with an invisible platform for decades and wanted to draw on the attention of the public health crisis that has claimed nearly 3 million lives and devastated the economy to encourage thinking about the interaction between science, politics and society.

Peter Brabeck, former chairman and CEO of Nestle who was appointed by the Swiss government to lead GESDA, uses COVID-19 as an example of how prior planning can help prevent future health crises, noting that the mRNA vaccine technology used now to fight the pandemic has been around for a decade.

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Australia rules out adding J&J vaccine to inoculation plans | World | Instant News


But the government shrugged off the target after notifying last week that Pfizer is now the preferred choice for people under 50 because of the potential risk of rare blood clots associated with AstraZeneca.

A man in the state of Victoria who received an injection of AstraZeneca on March 22 had to be hospitalized for a blood clot. The second case was reported Tuesday of a woman who was inoculated in the state of Western Australia and admitted to hospital in Darwin, regulators said in a statement.

With 700,000 doses of AstraZeneca injected in Australia since early March, the two cases are equivalent to a frequency of freezing 1-in-350,000, regulators said. British authorities say the risk of such blood clots is 1 in 250,000 in the country.

The government has doubled Pfizer’s orders to 40 million doses and Hunt said shipments of an additional 20 million doses were expected in the last three months of 2021.

“That means a significant sprint for those who weren’t vaccinated by then,” said Hunt, referring to the government’s hopes of having the population inoculated this year.

Australia hopes to deliver 4 million doses of the two vaccines by the end of March, but only injected 1.2 million doses on Monday.

An 80-year-old Australian man on Monday became Australia’s first COVID-19 death this year and 910 since the pandemic began.

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Charles: The royal family is ‘very grateful’ for the world’s support | National | Instant News


LONDON (AP) – Prince Charles of England paid a heartfelt tribute to “dear Papa” on Saturday as Buckingham Palace presented an outline of the royal funeral that the family will attend and broadcast around the world.

As Queen Elizabeth II and other relatives mourned, Charles offered a private video message saying the royal family was “ very grateful ” for the outpouring of support they received after the death of her 99-year-old father, Prince Philip, on Friday. The heir to the throne said he was touched by the number of people around the world who have shared the loss and sorrow of their families.

“My dad is a very special person who I think, above all, will be amazed by the reactions and touching things that have been said about him,” said Charles, speaking from his home in Highgrove in southwest England. “And from that point of view we, my family, are very grateful for all of that. It will sustain us in this special loss and in these very sad times. ”

Philip’s royal ceremonial funeral will take place April 17 at Windsor Castle – a leaner service amid the COVID-19 pandemic that is completely closed to the public. The palace insists the royals will strictly adhere to national virus guidelines, steps that would in theory require the use of masks in confined spaces and social distancing. The palace declined to comment specifically.

Philip, the husband of the 73-year-old queen who is also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, co-planned her own funeral and focused on family according to her wishes. Duke also took part in designing a modified Land Rover that would carry his coffin.

“Despite the reduced ceremonial arrangements, the occasion will still celebrate and acknowledge the life of the duke and more than 70 years of service to the Queen, England and the Commonwealth,” a palace spokesman said Saturday while speaking on condition of anonymity. with policy.

Prince Harry, Philip’s grandson who resigned from royal duties last year and now lives in California, will attend services in Windsor along with other members of the royal family. His wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, is pregnant and has been advised by her doctors not to travel far to England.

Another absentee was Prime Minister Boris Johnson, whose office said he would not attend because current coronavirus restrictions limit funerals to 30 people, so staying away would “ allow as many family members as possible. ”

The Palace advised the public not to gather in Windsor or at Buckingham Palace in London to pay tribute to Philip – advice that many ignore.

Earlier on Saturday, military teams across Britain and on ships at sea unleashed 41 guns to mark Philip’s death, honoring a former naval officer they considered one of them.

Batteries in London, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast – the capitals of the four nations that make up Great Britain – as well as other cities around Great Britain and the Mediterranean outpost at Gibraltar open fire at one-minute intervals starting at noon. The ships including HMS Montrose, a frigate that patrolled the Persian Gulf, paid their respects of their own.

“The Duke of Edinburgh served among us during the Second World War, and he remains in the service of the Royal Navy and the Armed Forces as a whole,” General Nick Carter, chief of defense staff, said in a statement. “A life well lived. His Majesty left us with a legacy of unshakable passion, fortitude and an unshakable sense of responsibility. “

Members of the Commonwealth, a group of 54 nations led by the queen, were also invited to honor Philip. The Australian Defense Force began saluting at 5 pm outside Parliament House in Canberra, and New Zealand plans to pay its own tribute on Sunday.

Philip joined the Royal Navy as a cadet in 1939 and had a promising military career. In 1941, he was honored for his services during the battle of Cape Matapan off the coast of Greece, when control of spotlights aboard the HMS Valiant allowed warships to pinpoint enemy ships in darkness. Philip rose to the rank of commander before he retired from active duty.

Two years after the war ended, Philip married Elizabeth at Westminster Abbey when he was 21 and she was 26. Philip’s naval career came to an abrupt end when King George VI died in 1952 and his wife became queen.

At the queen’s coronation in 1953, Philip vowed to become his wife’s “living and limb” and remain in the life of supporting the king. The couple has four children – Charles, heir to the throne, Anne, Andrew and Edward.

Prior to retiring from official duties in 2017, the prince conducted more than 22,000 solo public meetings and supported more than 780 organizations, including the Duke of Edinburgh Award for youth.

Community members continue to honor Philip’s service life, leaving flowers on Saturdays outside Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle.

“I think everyone wants to pay their respects,” said Maureen Field, 67, outside Windsor Castle. “Because of the virus, a lot of people have to stay away. He didn’t want a big funeral. He wanted some very private time with his family to say goodbye. So, we all have to respect that. “

Mike Williams, 50, traveled from his home in Surrey, southwest London, to Buckingham Palace in honor of the prince.

“He’s been a huge loss for the country and the world, I think, so we want to come and pay our respects,” said Williams. “I don’t know what was accomplished, but it feels like the right thing to do.”

Associated Press writers James Brooks and Tom Rayner contributed.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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