Tag Archives: the sea

Prince Philip’s Death: Fifty years of royal visit to New Zealand | Instant News


He was born in Greece, attended schools in France, Germany and Scotland, trained in England and served in World War II naval theater in the Indian Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

And, 10 times with his wife and less often alone, Prince Philip – who died Friday at age 99 – crossed many oceans to reach a collection of islands so distant from British monarchy a few kilometers further and he would find himself on his way back.

The first time, in the summer of 1953-1954, his wife Elizabeth was not only the newly crowned Queen, but also a mother of two.

Preparations, despite being offset by the Tangiwai tragedy – Prince Philip will lay wreaths at a mass funeral for victims of the Christmas Eve disaster – go far beyond digging up pregnant women.

Sheep tinged with Union Jack colors, sails erected to block tired buildings and armies of children in freshly sewn clothes were dispatched to parks, squares and train stations across the country.

The Queen and Prince Philip wave as the Royal chariot leaves Hastings in 1954.Photo / File
The Queen and Prince Philip wave as the Royal chariot leaves Hastings in 1954.Photo / File

Rotorua girl Miriama Searancke, 13, was among them, walking into Arawa Park with thousands of players and spectators in her new red boots with the Crown and the initials ER on the side.

“Everyone comes to perform for the Queen,” Searancke told the Daily Post in 2018.

“It was amazing.”

The 38-day tour takes the couple to 46 major cities and 110 events, with three-quarters of the country thought to have seen a royal surge.

Like all of the couple’s official tours over the past seven decades of marriage, Prince Philip is usually in the background.

When Pat Jamieson joined the crowd chanting “We want the Queen” outside the Revington Hotel in Greymouth, he was sure he actually took the couple to the balcony.
after – in a moment of silence – shouting “I want Duke”.

The 11-year-old had shared a moment with the empress earlier in the day after running half a mile beside their car during a street parade, she later told the NZHistory Government website.

“The Duke of Edinburgh looked across and said, ‘If you run any further, you’ll explode.'”

Masterton met the Royal couple in 1954. Image of Prince Philip at right.  Photos / Files
Masterton met the Royal couple in 1954. Image of Prince Philip at right. Photos / Files

He’s known for his long list of blunt – and often outrageous – comments.

One, drawn up in a 1954 letter to Australian politician Sir Harold Hartley and unearthed last year, paints a different picture of the Duke of Edinburgh’s thinking about New Zealand and its inhabitants than one can get from spontaneous waves or the laying of wreaths.

Māori are treated in New Zealand like “museum objects and pets”, he wrote, and the country is a “perfect welfare state” that is “excessively regulated with little room for initiative”.

However, he was impressed by the exhibits of the Māori culture museum, a special interest after reading The Coming of the Māori by Sir Peter Buck / Te Rangi Hīroa (Ngāti Mutunga).

And her people are “universally charming and overall most caring,” he wrote.

Shearer Godfrey Bowen demonstrated handheld technique for Queen and Prince Philip at Napier during the 1953/54 tour.  Photos / Files
Shearer Godfrey Bowen demonstrated handheld technique for Queen and Prince Philip at Napier during the 1953/54 tour. Photos / Files

He would return two years later – alone – to appear after the Melbourne Olympics.

A decade after their first hugely successful New Zealand tour, the royal couple sailed to the Bay of Islands on Royal Yacht Britannia on Waitangi Day 1963, visiting ports across the country, including Nelson, where the Duke – whose flagship Duke of Edinburgh rewards program helped thousands of children young people rule a precious life
skills – visit the Outward Bound School in Anakiwa.

The Queen and Duke, along with young Prince Charles and Princess Anne, returned seven years later for James Cook’s bicentennial, during which they debuted with the royal “walkabout”.

The royal couple will return to the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch four years later, three years after that to mark the Queen’s Silver Celebration – considered by some to be the closest to the joy of a quarter of a century earlier – and, in 1981, a brief visit following the Heads of the Commonwealth Government conference through the trench .

It may have been brief, but the 1981 tour left the country with captivating memories of Ginette McDonald’s Lyn of Laughter speaking directly to royals at the Royal Variety Performance.

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McDonald’s, characterized by a no-bra outfit, blue jumpsuit, and wide Kiwi accent, won over the Duke when he commented on the royals opening the memorial pool at Laughter.

“The Queen doesn’t laugh at anything,” McDonald later told New Zealand Women’s Weekly.

“Prince Philip who is engaged to me. We met them after that and he mumbled something in my ear. He said he liked the sound of the ‘piddling’ pool.”

The next most notable visit came in 1990, when New Zealand marked 150 years since the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Auckland hosted the Commonwealth Games, with the Queen, Duke and their son Prince Edward in attendance.

The Queen and Prince Philip meet members of the New Zealand Team at their headquarters in Auckland, from left, Ross Blackman, Tom Schnackenberg and Dean Barker.  Photos / Files
The Queen and Prince Philip meet members of the New Zealand Team at their headquarters in Auckland, from left, Ross Blackman, Tom Schnackenberg and Dean Barker. Photos / Files

The couple’s last visit to New Zealand was in 2002, with the only fault being related to the faulty Daimler, who suffered a flat battery.

Daimler, which is only used for visiting heads of state, has a flat battery.

As the royal couple waits on their now stationary plane bound for Australia, airport workers have the embarrassing task of pushing the incapacitated car off course.

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The Pantheon of Greek Shipping announces its Acceptance Ceremony for 2021 | Instant News


The Pantheon of Greek Shipping announced that they intend to host this year’s annual Reception Ceremony on the evening of Wednesday, July 7, 2021, as a live dinner event under the stars.

The Pantheon of Greek Shipping’s 2021 Introduction & Dinner Ceremony will celebrate Greece’s voyage and will pay tribute to historical figures who have contributed to its formation.
If public health regulations allowed it at the time, this would be the first time a long-awaited outdoor delivery event has taken place in the summer.
An exciting program will include the recent opening of Admissions to the Pantheon of Greek Shipping. The 2020 admissions will be combined with the 32 “big ones” that have already been admitted to the Pantheon.
The Pantheon of Greek Shipping will continue to support Hellenic Hope and a portion of the proceeds from this year’s event will go to this children’s charity, which focuses on providing assistance to children in need in Greece.

We are proud to support our famous sponsors to date:
ABS, IRI – The Marshall Islands Registry and Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding Co. as Co-Lead Sponsors of the Introduction Ceremony and Dinner 2021.

Christopher J. Wiernicki, ABS Chair, President and CEO commented:
“ABS is proud to honor these Greek shipping visionaries and to celebrate their continued insights and business genius. These leaders continue to shape shipping while creating a truly global legacy.” The Pantheon provides a valuable opportunity to reflect on the immense contribution Greek shipping has made to world trade and ABS welcomes it. all comers. “
Theophilos Xenakoudis, Director – Worldwide Business Operations & Managing Director Greece, International Registries Inc. comment:
“The Marshall Islands Registry celebrates the leaders of the Greek shipping community, who for centuries have led the shipping industry to innovate and transform. As we look forward to a decade of advanced technology and environmentally friendly solutions, we salute the recipients of the new Pantheon of Greek Shipping award- recently. ”
Wang Qi, Chairman of Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding, comments:

“SWS is delighted to once again support the Pantheon of Greek Shipping and pay tribute to its professed shipping legend. We enjoy a very close relationship with Greek shipping and the prestigious Pantheon of Greek Shipping event every year gives us the perfect opportunity to express our interest in history and Greek shipping culture and meeting some of our most important friends and customers. “
Introduction & The 2021 Dinner Ceremony will begin with a welcoming reception from the TMS.
Pantheon of Greek Shipping would like to thank the Navios Group for their generous support as a Dinner Sponsor.
So far, the confirmed Premium sponsors of the event are: Baltic Exchange, Bureau Veritas, Citi Private Bank and Moore Greece.
Sponsors so far include: China Classification Society, ClassNK, The Ecali Club, Isle of Man Ship Registry, Kyvernitis Travel Group, Lloyd’s Register and Marichem Marigases Worldwide Services.

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Australian SailGP Team for Season Two | Instant News


Australian SailGP Team for Season Two

by Australian SailGP Team 7 Apr 17:07 PDT

(Left to right) Tom Slingsby, Nina Curtis, Sam Newton, Lisa Darmanin Jason Waterhouse © Team Australia SailGP

Olympic Gold Medalist and Defending SailGP Champion Tom Slingsby reveals his team’s line-up to defend the Australian Championship title in SailGP Season 2.

After securing history by gaining victory as SailGP’s first Inaugural Champion, Slingsby, helm and CEO of the Australian team, has selected several members of his winning squad to join him in season 2, which kicks off in Bermuda April 24-25.

Apart from Slingsby, athletes returning from the winning squad include, Kyle Langford, 31, from Lake Macquarie, New South Wales (wing trimmer); Jason Waterhouse, 29, from Sydney (flight controller) Sam Newton, 35, from Sydney (grinder) and Kinley Fowler, 33, from Perth, Western Australia, (grinder / flight controller).

Nick Hutton will join the Australian team for Season 2 as a grinder, replacing Ky Hurst who has stepped out of the team to spend more time with his family in Australia. Hutton, originally from England, is the only international member of the majority of the Australian crew. He joins a team with a wealth of experience aboard a high-speed F50 catamaran, having previously sailed on the UK SailGP Team. He will join the crew having recently competed in the British Challenger for the 36th Copa America.

The squad also includes two successful candidates from the Australian SailGP Team’s women’s development program, Olympic Silver medalist Lisa Darmanin, 29, from Sydney and Nina Curtis, 32, from Sydney. The initiative launched last year aims to accelerate the inclusion of female athletes in the league.

The early phase of the program saw Darmanin and Curtis join the team for the season opening event in Bermuda in April. After pre-season training and development in Bermuda at least one athlete will be selected to join the team for the remainder of SailGP Season 2.

Commenting on the line-up for Season 2 Slingsby said: “Our squad features some of the most talented sailors in our country, including Olympians, Sydney To Hobart alumni and American Cup winners. We have proven how strong the team we have after our success in Season 1 and their ability and experience at the F50 will be very important when we face new tough competitions this season, such as Team New Zealand Peter Burling and AS Jimmy Spithill. Team. “We have used the time off between seasons to review our performance as a team and assess the improvements we can make. We are back hungrier than ever, with the aim of bringing home the Championship trophy for Australia. ”

In addition to Darmanin and Curtis to the Slingsby team added, “Lisa and Nina will be the first female athletes to sail the Australian F50, which is an important step in our mission as a league to increase opportunities for women in the sport. They are arguably two of the best female seafarers in Australia, and I’m looking forward to seeing how they use their years of experience competing in the Olympics and other competitions to develop their skills beyond the F50. ”

The dynamic league expanded Season 2 roster will consist of seven other Grand Prix Screen events, starting in Bermuda on April 24-25, and visiting Taranto, Italy (June 5-6), Plymouth, United Kingdom (July 17-18), Saint Louis. -Tropez, France (11-12 September), Cádiz, Spain (9-10 October), Christchurch, New Zealand (29-30 January 2022) and San Francisco, USA (26-27 March 2022).

The second season of SailGP will feature defending Australian champion Tom Slingsby, along with crews from Denmark, France, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United States. The season culminates with the Grand Final in San Francisco on March 26-27, 2022, when the champions will be determined in a one-million winner-take-all final.

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Scorching ocean: Scientists trace the East Coast’s ‘ocean heat wave’ | Instant News


Scientists are closely watching the unusually warm waters around the North Island’s East Coast – and predict an “ocean heat wave” could develop near Canterbury and Otago within a few days. Image Project / Moana

Scientists are closely watching the unusually warm waters around the North Island’s East Coast – and predict an “ocean heat wave” could develop near Canterbury and Otago within a few days.

Described as an extended period of extremely warm ocean temperatures at a particular location, ocean heat waves can last for several months and cover thousands of square kilometers.

“Scientifically, ocean heat waves are defined when the ocean temperature at a particular location is in the top 10 percent of the temperature normally recorded during that time of the year for five or more days,” explains University of Otago marine scientist Dr Robert Smith.

Events that have never happened before 2017-18 sparked New Zealand’s hottest summer and came with dramatic consequences.

Glaciers are melting as some pockets of sea off the South Island’s West Coast warmed to 6C above average, while elsewhere, seashells are suffering from flowing losses and vineyards are experiencing early harvests.

While sea surface temperatures around New Zealand have been near normal for much of last summer, Smith said a strong ocean heat wave developed during late February to the east of the country – and is still going on.

“This ocean heat wave is currently impacting the coastline of Wairarapa, Hawke’s Bay and Chatham Islands,” he said, adding that it had pushed temperatures more than 2 degrees Celsius above normal.

“The event was somewhat unusual in that it also covered much of New Zealand’s sub-Antarctic zone during the month of March, which is not, as the name implies, an area normally considered to experience a heat wave.”

At these ecological points, warmer oceans can disrupt all kinds of species, from plankton and seaweed to marine mammals and seabirds.

“They may also impact regional fisheries, including for the pāua around the Chatham Islands.”

As part of The Moana Project – a five-year, $ 11.5 million collaboration aimed at making New Zealand the world leader in ocean forecasting capabilities – Smith and fellow Otago researchers are working to gain a clearer understanding of heat waves and their effects.

The project has also seen the file launch free ocean heat wave forecasting system.

“Currently, we provide short distance forecasts of up to seven days, where and when ocean heat waves are most likely to occur, for specific coastal locations around New Zealand,” he said.

“These sites include Hauraki Bay, Bay of Plenty, Cook Strait, and Banks Peninsula. While the current tool provides us with short-term estimates, we are looking for ways to extend this estimate to several months using machine learning techniques.

“This research will help us predict these extreme events with more certainty and provide a warning to our marine industry and important coastal communities.”

This can guide efforts such as early harvesting, or, at a coastal cultivation facility, even moving stocks.

Heat waves can occur relatively quickly, and are triggered by a variety of factors.

“On a local scale, these factors include ocean currents that build up areas of very warm water, warming through the ocean surface from the atmosphere and reduced wind speeds that prevent the mixing of the oceans,” he said.

“The likelihood of ocean heat waves is also influenced by weather and large-scale climate patterns, such as El Niño and La Niña.”

Research has shown that global climate change is also having a big impact, with heat waves becoming 34 percent more frequent, and 17 percent longer, since the mid-20th century.

Even more concerning, Smith said, is that the number of heatwave days has increased by more than 50 percent each year.

“The recent ocean heat wave has had a devastating effect on marine ecosystems around the world,” he said.

“For example, they have triggered widespread mortality of marine species, shifts in the abundance and distribution of commercial and recreational fish stocks and the need to limit or shut down fisheries due to disease outbreaks, or the growth of harmful algae.”

Over time, he said the increased exposure of marine ecosystems to extreme temperatures could lead to “irreversible loss of important species or habitats”, such as seaweed forests and seagrass meadows.

“Ocean heat waves are therefore of serious concern to our marine life around New Zealand, which has been thriving on cooler seas,” he said.

“The impacts associated with ocean heatwaves are also a threat to aquaculture and fisheries, New Zealand’s industry worth over $ 4 billion per year.”

Scientists solve the mystery of shells

Meanwhile, scientists working on another Moana Project study combined Mātauranga Māori – or Māori lore – with other strands of science to solve the shellfish mystery.

Green-lipped mussels are an important cultivated species in New Zealand, and resources are valued at more than $ 300 million a year.

Although the aquaculture industry relies heavily on wild-caught baby mussels, or saliva, it is unclear which wild mussel beds supply them.

“Knowing the source of the splash enables the protection of spawning stocks and thus helps the future-resilient New Zealand shellfish aquaculture industry,” said Moana project and science director João de Souza.

In their new study, University of Victoria marine biologist Professor Jonathan Gardner and his team will put together what he calls a “unique combination” of science to reveal where shellfish larvae come from, how they travel, and where they end up.

Green-lipped mussels are a marine resource worth $ 300 million annually to the New Zealand economy.  Photo / Paul Estcourt
Green-lipped mussels are a marine resource worth $ 300 million annually to the New Zealand economy. Photo / Paul Estcourt

“By doing that we will be able to predict the movement of larvae now and under different climate change scenarios.”

With population genetics, samples from the collected shells are genotyped – a process that effectively provides DNA fingerprinting linking different populations.

Microochemical analysis, which involves using a laser to take small samples of the shells of shells, can also provide a chemical record of the age of the shells, and where they traveled.

Mātauranga Māori offers local ecological knowledge that can help establish the location of the splash-producing clam reefs.

Finally, a physical model of the flow will be combined with biological data to predict and see the movement of green-lipped shellfish larvae in the Bay of Plenty, where the first samples were taken.

A further trip is planned to collect mussel larvae using a “splash line” – a vertical line of saliva-catching ropes for the walking spit to settle down.

After collection, any saliva that settles will undergo micro-chemical analysis.

“While the Bay of Plenty is the focus right now, we will also be sampling from several other areas, including Ninety Mile Beach which is where most of the shellfish spit is caught free,” said Gardner.

It is also hoped that the study, which is expected to take up to two years, will help combat invasive species, inform marine spatial planning efforts, and assist coastal restoration efforts.

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NZ Millennium Cup begins, with an innovative scoring system | Instant News


NZ Millennium Cup begins, with an innovative scoring system

by Isla McKechnie / Albatross PR Mar 28 6:57 AM PDT
March 29, 2021

NZ builds Silvertip superyacht racing in NZ Millennium Cup | © Jeff Brown

The NZ Millennium Cup is in progress, with a new innovative handicap system for superyacht regattas.

New Zealand’s summer racing continues, as the NZ Millennium Cup gets underway with a welcoming event at the Duke of Marlborough, sponsored by Southern Spars.

Sunday night’s event marks the start of the South Pacific’s longest-running superyacht regatta and also marks a new era in the superyacht ranking system.

This year’s race will be especially exciting with the introduction of a different handicap scoring method developed for superyacht racing by the Offshore Racing Congress (ORC). This is the first time it will be used in a superyacht regatta, although it is used by the ORC for non-superyacht regatta, and uses the average wind speed experienced at the course of the race and calculated on the elapsed time around the course of the winning ship in corrected times. .

New system; The Performance Curve score was adopted by race handicappers (ORC) and specific competitors for the NZ Millennium Cup regatta, with representatives from each cruise ship expressing excitement about the new methods to be used in the coming week.

At a pre-race briefing, the lead racing officer, Harold Bennett, develops race plans for the competitors. Citing the urge to ensure exciting racing, Bennett described the morning race to be windy / strong winds around Ninepin as the top score, while the afternoon race would be longer, using a combination of the many islands in the Bay of Islands, plus the occasional buoy, to make sure the yacht is tested with leg of the wind, reaching out and downwind.

With the formality of racing, owners, crew and guests settle in to enjoy the hospitality of the Duke of Marlborough, including the Mount Gay Cocktails which are a nod to Russell’s colonial-era reputation as one of the wildest ports in the Pacific. With Mount Gay’s Missionary’s Downfall in hand, guests are treated to Bruno Trouble, as they prepare for the race in one of the world’s largest natural playgrounds which kicks off on Monday morning.

The sailing race, which runs from March 28-31, is one of the must-do regatts on the world’s superyacht circuit and has garnered a reputation as a fun, friendly, but highly competitive regatta. The Cup marks the final chapter in an exhilarating racing season in New Zealand.

The sailing competition was first held in conjunction with the 2000 American Cup and is now in its 15th year. It is the South Pacific’s longest running superyacht race and has built a reputation for friendship and fierce competition.

The screen race will be available to watch live www.millenniumcup.com.

Race Notices and Sailing Instructions have amendments issued, and can be found at www.millenniumcup.com.

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