Tag Archives: the trend

Will 2020 Finally Force Mode to Break its Greenwashing Habits? | Instant News


It’s easy to pull out a list of keywords that were born from the sustainability movement: “ethical,” “organic,” “conscious,” “transparent,” even “sustainability” itself. Intersectionality was never on the list, nor was it mentioned in the mainstream media; the only silver lining is that it was never co-opted or considered meaningless, either. But a brand cannot really be “sustainable” – even by its own definition – if it does not think of intersectionality, which is defined as “an inclusive version of environmentalism that advocates for human and planetary protection” by Leah Thomas in her recent Mode op-ed. “This identifies the ways in which injustices occur in marginalized communities and the earth is interconnected,” he wrote. “This brings injustice done to the most vulnerable communities, and the earth, to the forefront and does not minimize or silence social inequality.”

This also contradicts many of the long-held beliefs about fashion about sustainability: that once a designer starts using organic cotton, it’s “sustainable”; that designers work with craftsmen in Africa and India to give them jobs and “preserve their craft,” not because of their unmatched quality (even though the white savior in fashion is another story); and, more broadly, that social justice and protecting the environment are separate issues. You cannot fly a flag to protect the oceans without considering the effects of climate change on Black, brown, and native populations; You don’t have to dedicate your life to veganism without an understanding of food security in a low-income environment.

There shouldn’t be the killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Elijah McClain, and Tony McDade and the subsequent Black Lives Matter protest to wake many of us up to that difference, but the power behind this movement is pushing the industry to be more serious about change than it should be. Black Lives Matter has also empowered consumers to join in conversations and use their voices like never before: When high and low fashion brands rushed to post black boxes on #BlackoutTuesday in a lazy display of signaling, which failed to really take a stand – and contribute to BLM goals, set actionable goals to increase diversity in their organizations, “share microphones” with Black voices, or simply acknowledge past mistakes and vow to do better – immediately called. Others were found to have a problematic corporate culture that was at odds with their positions of doing good and was quickly canceled and, in the case of Reformasi, Refinery 29, and The Wing, Their CEO was removed. Last night, it became much more difficult for brands to hide behind empty slogans, beautiful photographs, or unclear campaigns, whether it was about social justice or the environment. Consumers want to see real action and real change, not marketing. Your supply chain is 100% organic? Show me You say you pay a living wage for your factory workers. Can you prove it? You claim to be aware of how climate change is affecting the communities around you … but what do you do to support them?

“What Black Lives Matter has done so strongly is to show that we need to have accountability, and that cannot be just words,” Maxine B├ędat, founder of the New Standard Institute, said at a recent call. “We need to do a demonstration about what is actually being done [by a brand] to overcome the problems of racial injustice and racial justice, and what is done for the environment. This movement highlights the difference between real change and green washing, or green confusion. We turn to the accountability paradigm in space, which will actually lead to a more sustainable industry. “

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New Zealand salmon company enters US retail market 2020-07-29 | Instant News


NEW YORK – New Zealand Salmon Co. introduced the retail line of products under the Regal Wood Roasted King Salmon brand for sale in the United States. The firewood filet is available in four flavors, including New Zealand beech, double manuka, pepper and spices, and sweet chili and lime.

The channel is currently available on Amazon and certain retailers in the Northeast. Salmon comes in a 3.5 ounce package, is sold in a supermarket fridge and has a suggested retail price of $ 9.99.

The Regal Wood Roasted King Salmon brand was launched in New Zealand in 2012. US expansion is a natural step, said Michael Fabbro, vice president of North America.

“With almost all Americans cooking at home now, our Salmon Roasted Wood produces extraordinary taste and quality with little effort,” he said

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Best Summer Clothing for Women Over 50 | Instant News


Susan Feldman is a co-founder of One Kings Lane and On Groove, a style destination where she shares clothes and shopping tips that challenge her age. Feldman is also our resident style expert here at Who What Wear, and he shares everything from the basics that he has relied on for years for style mistakes that he won’t repeat. Today, we have tapped on it to discuss how quarantine has changed its summer style.

Well, quarantine naturally gives a different lens to what trends I’m embracing for the summer. The truth is that the things I usually like in the summer I love more, and the things that – given the circumstances – seem trivial or inappropriate that I let go on the side of the road. It seems I have no reason to use certain items now because I usually like it this time of year, but I am sure once we are on the other side of all this I will return.

Now, this is clear about everything comfort and simplicity, but I’ve achieved things that help me feel feminine and a little weird, like a beautiful white blouse. I have never worn a lot of jewelry, but I have found that I am interested in fun accessories that are a bit like headbands and bracelets and rings that are fun. In the end, when we are all quarantined, remember to take care of ourselves and get out of sweat every once in a while.

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Can Antiviral Fashion Protect Our Health and Simplify Our Lives? | Instant News


The general sentiment about the rise of athleisure is that we need clothes that work harder for us. Leggings and sports clothing move with our bodies, dry sweat, block UV rays, and generally “follow” our busy lifestyles, whether we are exercising or just carrying out tasks. For most of us, that is the beginning and end of the hard work, high-tech fashion. As ModeLaird Borrelli-Persson’s archive editor showed earlier this year, designers were developing sophisticated ways to sell and market their clothing online, but only a few considered working on garment technology themselves. “The integration of functions and styles is the new frontier, and the future,” he wrote.

A glimpse of the future will probably arrive sooner than we thought. That coronavirus pandemic has overturned the fashion industry and made runway performances (for the most part) stopped, but also forced us to reconsider the role played by clothes in our lives. Most of us realize that we have too much, and not enough things really make sense at the moment. We also became very aware of everything we touched, from the door handle to the grocery cart to, yes, the clothes on our bodies. After traveling to the market, should we immediately change and wash clothes at the highest temperature? What is the risk of hugging someone in the clothes we wear on the subway? And if we shop at the store, is it safe to try something?

All these concerns have accelerated the development of fabrics which can actually support our health. Swiss textile company HeiQ launch a new one Viroblock technology back in March, a process that adds an invisible film to the fabric that kills 99.9% of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to contact. Hoi Kwan Lam, CMO of the company, cites research showing the virus can live on fabric at room temperature for up to two days; Viroblock killed it within 30 minutes, and the technology remained intact for up to 30 laundry cycles.

HeiQ actually started developing Viroblock in 2013, but it was not yet a top priority until a pandemic was detected in China in early 2020. Anticipating potential spread, the team reviewed the formation of Viroblock, made some changes, and went to the market in March, as COVID-19 began impact almost every corner of the world. Naturally, Viroblock was first used in medical masks in hospitals, but several fashion brands have explored the possibility of antiviral clothing as well.

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6 Instagram Summer Fashion Trends That Are Worth a Try | Instant News


Fashion trends usually develop from three different sources: designer runway shows, participants outside the designer stage show, and Instagram. The latter, while the latest from the trend dictator, is arguably the most influential. It’s easy for certain clothing styles, clothing, or even camera pose to catch and spread like wildfire on a daily basis.

I recently noticed six specific trends every one imposed on ‘grams. From butterfly jewelry (my personal fave) to one-shoulder tanks (very easy to wear), I won’t be surprised if this makes it your next Instagram photo. Don’t worry – I will like and comment.

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