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Durbin Discusses Withdrawal of Troops from Germany, Covid-19 Testing with the Minister of Defense | Instant News




Durbin Discusses Withdrawal of Troops from Germany, Testing Covid-19 with the Minister of Defense | RiverBender.com



























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Timeline of events in the Meng Wanzhou case | Instant News


The timeline of the Meng Wanzhou case, and rising tensions between Canada and China.

2018

August 22: A New York court issued a warrant for the arrest of Huawei Technologies Meng Wanzhou’s chief financial officer.

December 1: Canadian authorities arrested Meng at Vancouver airport after an extradition request from America. The news became public on December 5.

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December 6: China demands that Canada release Meng and “immediately correct the mistakes” made by officials in arresting him. The Chinese say they were not informed of the reason for Ms. Meng’s arrest. In Ottawa, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the Meng case was part of an independent legal process without outside political influence.

December 7: Meng appeared in a Vancouver court, where accusations of fraud were made. The US accuses Misleading American banks in an effort to avoid American sanctions against Iran.

December 8: Canada’s Ambassador to China, John McCallum, was summoned to a meeting with the assistant foreign minister of China so that the country could register complaints about Meng’s arrest.

December 9: China summoned the American ambassador to China to file a similar complaint about the Meng case and sue the U.S. cancel his arrest warrant.

December 10: Chinese authorities arrested two Canadian men. Michael Kovrig, who is on leave from Canada’s Global Affairs, and businessman Michael Spavor. Kovrig’s arrest became public on December 11. Spavor became public on December 12.

December 11: Meng was released with a guarantee of $ 10 million. U.S. President Donald Trump told Reuters that he would “definitely intervene” in Meng’s case “if I thought it was necessary” to help establish a trade agreement with China.

December 12: The Chinese foreign ministry said it had no information about Kovrig but said the organization he worked for – the International Crisis Group – was not registered in China, making its activities in the country illegal.

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December 13: Trump’s trade adviser, Peter Navarro, said the arrest of the two Canadians was clearly a response to Meng’s arrest. China’s foreign ministry said Kovrig and Spavor had been arrested on suspicion of “endangering national security.”

December 14: Canadian officials were given consular access to Kovrig, and McCallum met with him in Beijing.

December 16: Canadian diplomats in China are given consular access to Spavor.

December 20: An indictment not sealed in the United States accused two Chinese nationals of targeting companies in Canada and around the world as part of a hacking campaign for years to steal data.

December 21: Kovrig’s employer, the International Crisis Group, said he had not been given access to a lawyer when he was detained. A source who knows the conditions of detention Kovrig said he was interrogated three times a day and kept in a room with lights on continuously. Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland formally demanded the two men be released, calling for a statement “for their immediate release.” Similar statements came from the United States, Britain and the European Union.

December 24: The Chinese foreign ministry called on the United States, Britain and the European Union, saying the three had to condemn Canada for Meng’s arrest.

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2019

January 3: At a press conference, Chinese public prosecutor Zhang Jun said Kovrig and Spavor “without doubt” violated Chinese law. He said the investigation also followed the rule of law but gave no further details about the allegations.

January 7: The Prime Minister’s Office said Trump had stressed his respect for judicial independence. In a summary of phone calls between Trump and Trudeau, the PMO indicated the leaders were discussing a U.S. extradition request the famous – although Meng was not mentioned – and agreed on the importance of respecting the independence of judges and the rule of law.

January 9: The Chinese envoy in Ottawa suggested that Canada and its Western allies were white supremacy for calling for the release of two Canadians who were jailed last month by their country’s communist government. Ambassador Lu Shaye made accusations in an op-ed in the Hill Times.

January 14: Trudeau said he was very concerned to see China “acting arbitrarily” by applying the death sentence to a Canadian convicted of drug trafficking. He said Canada would do everything it could to intervene on behalf of Robert Lloyd Schellenberg when a court in Dalian in northeastern Liaoning province announced that they had given Schellenberg a death sentence after reconsidering his case.

January 15: China expressed “strong dissatisfaction” with Trudeau for his criticism of Schellenberg’s sentence. Trudeau must “respect the rule of law, respect the sovereignty of Chinese justice, correct mistakes and stop making irresponsible statements,” foreign ministry spokesman Hua Chunying said.

January 16: The US State Department said China’s death sentence on Schellenberg was “politically motivated.” A statement said US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Freeland spoke and “expressed their concern about the arbitrary detention and punishment of politically motivated Canadian citizens.”

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January 17: Ambassador Shaye said Canada’s arrest of Meng was an act of “verbal abuse” by a friend. Lu warned of “impact” if Canada banned companies from the new 5G network for security reasons, as did the three allies who shared intelligence.

January 18: Public Security Minister Ralph Goodale said the government’s decision on whether to ban Huawei to be used in Canada’s next generation 5G wireless network would not be affected by the threat of retaliation from China.

January 22: China demands that the US drop a request for Canada to extradite Meng. Foreign Ministry spokesman Hua Chunying said Meng’s case was unusual and Canada’s extradition treaty with the US violated “the safety and legitimate rights and interests of Chinese citizens.”

January 23: Ambassador McCallum said there were strong legal arguments that Meng could make to help him avoid extradition to the United States. Speaking to Chinese reporters the day before in the Toronto area, McCallum listed several arguments that could be submitted by Meng’s legal team to defend him.

January 24: Trudeau rejected calls to remove McCallum after his comments to Chinese journalists, saying such a change would not help the two Canadians detained by Chinese authorities return early. Later, McCallum said he had “made a mistake” when he suggested the Huawei executive detained by Meng Wanzhou had good reason to avoid extradition to the United States.

January 25: McCallum told StarMetro Vancouver that it would be “good for Canada” if the United States canceled its extradition request. “We must ensure that if the US enters into such an agreement, that also includes the release of our two people. And the US is very aware of that, “he told Star.

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January 26: McCallum resigned as ambassador to China at Trudeau’s request.

January 28: The US Department of Justice formally equates criminal charges against Huawei, two subsidiaries and Meng. The accusation, which is contained in two indictments that have not yet been sealed, alleges that Huawei misrepresented its ownership of a Hong Kong-based subsidiary to avoid American sanctions against Iran. Furthermore, they said Huawei stole telecommunications technology, trade secrets, and equipment from US cellphone provider T-Mobile USA. Accused of bank fraud, wire fraud, and two counts of conspiracy to do both. In a statement, Huawei denied committing the violations mentioned in the indictment.

January 29: The Canadian government says it has received an official request for Meng’s extradition, which appeared in a Vancouver court to change the people who gave him financial guarantees for his release.

March 1st: The Department of Justice gave a formal green light to continue the extradition case.

March 3: Meng’s defense team announced it had filed a civil claim notification stating “serious violations” of their client’s constitutional rights.

March 4: China accuses the two arrested Canadians of acting together to steal state secrets. Trudeau rejected the allegations made in Chinese state media, saying: “It is unfortunate that China continues to move forward in this arbitrary detention.”

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March 6: A lawyer for Meng told the judge that the United States’ offer for extradition raised serious concerns about the political motivation behind the case.

March 14: Huawei pleaded not guilty in a New York court to accusing him of planning to violate Iran’s trade sanctions. Lawyers entered a defense in federal court in Brooklyn, two weeks after Huawei pleaded not guilty to separating federal demands filed in Seattle by accusing the company of stealing technology from T-Mobile.

March 22: A judge ordered the RCMP to provide copies of content on Meng’s seven electronic devices after they were arrested when he was arrested. Judge Heather Holmes of the British Columbia Supreme Court said the RCMP had to make copies of data on the iPhone, iPad, Macbook Air, Huawei phones, two SIM cards and flash drives.

March 29: The federal government says it is considering subsidizing farmers affected by Canada’s $ 2 billion import canola ban.

April 29: Saskatchewan Prime Minister Scott Moe said Ottawa needs to treat Chinese imports with the same supervision as China shows Canadian canola shipments.

May 1: The federal government is changing the payment program for canola farmers to help those affected by China’s decision to ban Canadian products.

May 2: China suspended export permits for two Canadian pork exporters, including the Quebec-based Olymel LP, amid rising tensions between the two countries.

May 8: Meng’s defense team told the judge that he planned to argue that he should not be extradited to the United States because he had not committed fraud under Canadian law and his arrest was illegal.

May 9: Canadian diplomats were joined in the Chinese courtroom by American, British, French and German colleagues to witness an appeal in the Schellenberg case.

May 16: China officially arrested Kovrig and Spavor, bringing them closer to justice on unclear state security allegations. A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman said they had been arrested for allegedly stealing state secrets. Goodale said the federal government was “very concerned” about China’s decision, adding that no evidence had been produced to show the validity of the allegations made against them.

May 23: The Chinese ambassador to Canada said bilateral relations were at the “lowest point” compared to the time since diplomatic relations were first established decades ago. In the text prepared for the speech, Lu Shaye said that he felt sad that Canadian-Canadian relations were at what he called “freezing.”

June 5: Lawyers for the RCMP and the Canadian Border Services Agency denied allegations that their officers were looking for Huawei Meng Wanzhou’s telephone and electronic devices after a border official wrote down his password. A joint response filed in court for Mr. Meng’s civil suit said a border officer asked Mr. Meng for a telephone number and password if he was asked to search for devices for customs or immigration purposes. Meng’s civil suit was filed at B.C. The Supreme Court accused “serious violations” of his constitutional rights and accused officers of detaining and questioning him for three hours before notifying him of his arrest.

June 24: Defense attorneys for Meng asked foreign affairs ministers to stop the extradition proceedings against their clients, saying requests made by the United States were for political purposes, not legal reasons. The lawyer said in a statement that they decided to send a written submission to Freeland after the comments of former prime minister Jean Chretien who reported that withdrawing the extradition process would improve relations with China and win the release of the two Canadians detained there.

August 20: Court documents released before Meng’s extradition hearing showed a Canadian border official questioning him about his business before the RCMP arrested him. Nearly 1,100 pages of material released by the court were collected by Meng’s defense team.

August 21: Lawyer Meng accused Canadian officials of acting as “law enforcement” agents of American law while he was detained at Vancouver airport for three hours before his arrest. In court documents, they pointed to handwritten notes by Canadian officers showing Meng’s electronics collected in anticipation at the request of the Federal Investigation Bureau in the United States.

September 4: Business consultant Dominic Barton was appointed as Canada’s new ambassador to China.

September 23: The crown said Canadian officials followed the law when they arrested Meng and the defense had no evidence to prove “conspiracy theories” that he was illegally arrested. The Canadian Attorney General said in court documents that there was no evidence to suggest that the RCMP or FBI asked border agents to obtain information from Mr. Meng during his detention.

September 24: A lawyer for Meng said there was no “routine” about the way he was interrogated by border officials before he read his rights and was told about his detention when Meng’s defense team asked BC. The Supreme Court will force the release of further documents to support his argument before the extradition hearing in January.

October 1: A prosecutor told the judge that Canadian border guards mistakenly gave an RCMP passcode to Meng’s electronic device when he was interrogated at Vancouver airport. Crown said when the border agency realized that they had made a mistake, they told the RCMP that the codes could not be used or distributed because they were obtained during border checks.

October 29: The federal government said Canada’s new ambassador to China had met with Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor.

October 31: In the document, Meng’s lawyer argued that there was an “atmosphere of reality” to the allegation that the RCMP illegally shared details of its electronic devices with the FBI, despite new written statements from Mounties that denied the claim.

November 5: The Chinese ban on the import of Canadian pork and beef products estimated to cost farmers nearly $ 100 million was lifted.

November 24: The new Canadian foreign affairs minister spent an hour in talks with his Chinese counterpart about the fate of Kovrig and Spavor. Francois-Philippe Champagne spoke with Wang Yi from China the day before at a meeting of G20 foreign ministers in Japan.

November 28: Lawyers for Meng said the United States “dressed up” his complaint that he violated sanctions as a fraud case when they asked the B.C. The Supreme Court rejects extradition. In court documents released, Meng’s legal team said the alleged misrepresentation did not mean fraud and transactions processed by HSBC were not illegal in Canada.

December 2: Meng said that he had experienced feelings of helplessness, torture and struggle since his arrest, but was no longer afraid of the unknown. In a post on the website of a Chinese telecommunications company, Meng said he had spent time on bail at one of his Vancouver homes reading books, chatting with colleagues and painting.

December 10: Justice Minister David Lametti said he was troubled that Kovrig and Spavor had been denied access to lawyers because they were facing a trial in which the verdict was actually guaranteed. Meanwhile, Meng won an application in BC. The Supreme Court asked for more documents to be disclosed when he accused the process of being misused during his arrest.

March 13: Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the Chinese Embassy in Canada said Kovrig had been allowed to have a telephone conversation with his father, who was very ill. The embassy said in a statement that they allowed the appeal for humanitarian reasons, and it also said Kovrig and fellow prisoner Michael Spavor were given better food to strengthen their immunity to the novel coronavirus.

January 23: A lawyer for Meng argued that the extradition case against him was a test of whether the court would reject foreign allegations that contradicted Canadian values ​​as a trial summarized in the B.C. Supreme Court. The trial focused on the double criminality test. Crown advisor Robert Frater said the judge did not need to consider the American sanctions law for allegations that were considered fraud in Canada.

May 21: B.C. The Supreme Court said Judge Heather Holmes would acquittal over a double crime on May 27.

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Michigan coronavirus (COVID-19) up to 53,913 cases; The death toll is now at 5,158 | Instant News


The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Michigan had increased to 53,913 on Friday, including 5,158 deaths, state officials reported.

Friday’s renewal represents 403 new cases and 29 additional deaths. Thursday’s total was 53,520 confirmed cases and 5,129 deaths.

New cases and deaths continue to slow down in Michigan, along with hospitalization. Testing nearly doubled last week, with an average of more than 15,000 per day.

On Monday, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced bars, restaurants and retails will be partially reopened in 32 districts. On Thursday, Whitmer announced partial reopening in all business states and revocation of nonessential medical and dental procedures.

Whitmer’s new order too allows a meeting of 10 people or fewer.

MORE: Here everything in Whitmer has been reopened throughout the state

Whitmer at this time order remains at home valid until May 28. He was recently announced a 6-phase plan to reopen the country.

Michigan has reported 28,234 COVID-19 recoveries. Country also reported “active cases,” which was listed at 20,100 on Thursday.

According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 298,000 have recovered in the U.S., with more than 1.5 million cases reported throughout the country. More than 95,000 have died in the U.S.

Worldwide, more than 5.1 million people have been confirmed infected and more than 335,000 people have died, according to Johns Hopkins University. The actual number is of course much higher, due to limited testing, the nation’s different ways of calculating deaths and deliberately reported by several governments.

MORE: Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer extended orders to remain at home until May 28

For most people, coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms that go away in two to three weeks. For some people, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, can cause more severe illnesses, including pneumonia and death.

Having trouble seeing the data below? Click here to see.

Following is a time graph of confirmed coronavirus cases (COVID-19) in Michigan:

The following is the number of mapped Michigan territories and the total number of cases in each US state:

Following are COVID-19 deaths in Michigan mapped per county:

Following are the Michigan COVID-19 cases divided by age range (look here if you don’t see the table):

Following are the Michigan COVID-19 cases disaggregated by sex (look here if you don’t see the table):

How COVID-19 Spreads

Spread person to person

This virus is thought to spread primarily from person to person.

  • Between people who come in close contact with each other (at a distance of about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These drops can land on the mouth or nose of people who are nearby or may be inhaled into the lungs.

Can someone spread the virus without pain?

  • People are considered the most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).
  • Some spread may occur before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this happening with this new coronavirus, but this is not considered to be the primary way of spreading the virus.

Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

It is possible for someone to get COVID-19 by touching a surface or an object that has a virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or eyes, but this is not considered the main way the virus spreads.

How easily the virus spread

How easily the virus spreads from person to person can vary. Some viruses are very contagious (spread easily), such as measles, while other viruses do not spread easily. Another factor is whether the spread is continuous, spreads continuously without stopping.

Prevention & Treatment

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent disease is to avoid getting this virus. However, as a reminder, the CDC always recommends daily precautions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover the cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched using ordinary household cleaning spray.

Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing the nose, coughing, or sneezing.

MORE: Beaumont Health launched the coronavirus hotline for patients with symptoms

People who think that they might be exposed to COVID-19 should contact their health care provider immediately.

Questions about coronavirus? Ask Dr. McGeorge is here.

Read more about coronavirus here.

Copyright 2020 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

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Michigan coronavirus (COVID-19) up to 37,203; The death toll is now at 3,274 | Instant News


The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Michigan has risen to 37,203 on Saturday, including 3,274 deaths, state officials report.

Saturday’s update includes 573 new cases and 189 additional deaths. Friday’s number includes 36,641 cases of corona virus and 3,085 deaths.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services compares records that identify COVID-19 infection as a contributing factor to the death of all COVID-19 cases confirmed by laboratories in the Michigan Disease Surveillance System. If the death certificate is matched with a confirmed COVID-19 case and that the records in MDSS do not indicate the person died, MDSS records are updated to indicate death and the appropriate local health department is notified.

On Saturday, April 25, the total official recovery was 8,342.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has extended his stay order at Michigan’s home until May 15 while loosening some restrictions on state business.

Michigan residents are now required to wear masks in public places, such as grocery stores, below an overnight stay order revised by the governor.

State officials say despite an increase in daily cases this week, the growth rate continues to slow, while the testing rate continues to rise. Officials on Wednesday noted a 15 percent reduction in virus hospitalizations over the past 10 days.

READ: Experts project aggressive social distance can drastically reduce Michigan’s 19th COVID case in May

Michigan chief medical officer, Dr. Joneigh S. Khaldun said the state was processing 7,400 tests on Thursday, a record one day in the state.

According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 51,000 Americans have died from the corona virus and there are now more than 905,000 confirmed cases in the United States.

Worldwide, more than 2.8 million people have been confirmed infected and more than 198,000 have died, according to Johns Hopkins University. The actual number is of course much higher, due to limited testing, the nation’s different ways of calculating deaths and deliberately reported by several governments.

The latest local news about the coronavirus pandemic:

MORE: Are you eligible for a $ 1,200 government stimulus check? How and when will the money come in?

Increasing cases does not discredit social distance

It is important to note that while the number of cases is increasing, that doesn’t mean social distance doesn’t work. People who test positive can now be exposed to the virus a few weeks ago, and many people have no symptoms for several days.

It will it can take weeks to see the results of an overnight stay at home and other social distance measures that have been taken. In addition, the state still reports the results of the test heap.

EXPERT: Optimism about the possibility of coronavirus treatment (COVID-19) comes with negative side effects

For most people, new coronaviruses cause mild or moderate symptoms that go away in two to three weeks. For some people, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, can cause more severe illnesses, including pneumonia and death.

Having trouble seeing the data below? Click here to see.

Following is a time graph of confirmed coronavirus cases (COVID-19) in Michigan:

The following is the number of mapped Michigan territories and the total number of cases in each US state:

Following are COVID-19 deaths in Michigan mapped per county:

Following are the Michigan COVID-19 cases divided by age range (look here if you don’t see the table):

Following are the Michigan COVID-19 cases disaggregated by sex (look here if you don’t see the table):

How COVID-19 Spreads

Spread person to person

This virus is thought to spread primarily from person to person.

  • Between people who come in close contact with each other (at a distance of about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These drops can land on the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or may be inhaled into the lungs.

Can someone spread the virus without pain?

  • People are considered the most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).
  • Some spread may occur before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this happening with this new coronavirus, but this is not considered to be the primary way of spreading the virus.

Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

It is possible for someone to get COVID-19 by touching a surface or an object that has a virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or eyes, but this is not considered the main way the virus spreads.

How easily the virus spread

How easily the virus spreads from person to person can vary. Some viruses are very contagious (spread easily), such as measles, while other viruses do not spread easily. Another factor is whether the spread is continuous, spreads continuously without stopping.

Prevention & Treatment

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent disease is to avoid getting this virus. However, as a reminder, the CDC always recommends daily precautions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover the cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched using ordinary household cleaning spray.

Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing the nose, coughing, or sneezing.

MORE: Beaumont Health launched the coronavirus hotline for patients with symptoms

People who think that they might be exposed to COVID-19 should contact their health care provider immediately.

Questions about coronavirus? Ask Dr. McGeorge is here.

Read more about coronavirus here.

Copyright 2020 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

.



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