Tag Archives: treatment

Germany uses the drug Regeneron which Trump – Health has mentioned | Instant News


Germany will become the first EU country to start using the same experimental antibody treatment that is believed to help Donald Trump recover from Covid-19, health minister Jens Spahn said Sunday.

“The government has purchased 200,000 doses for 400 million euros ($ 486 million),” said Spahn Photo on Sunday newspaper, working with 2,000 euros per dose.

The so-called monoclonal antibody cocktail will be deployed to university hospitals in the coming week, he said, adding that Germany was “the first country in the EU” to use it in the fight against the pandemic.

Spahn did not specify which manufacturers would supply the drugs but confirmed they were the same drugs that were given to then US president Trump when he fell ill with Covid last October.

“They work like passive vaccinations. Giving these antibodies at an early stage can help high-risk patients avoid more serious development,” said Spahn.

Trump, who was briefly hospitalized with the coronavirus, was given antibody therapy developed by US company Regeneron, known as REGN-COV2, even before the treatment received regulatory approval.

He later said that the drug did “a wonderful job”.

The US company Eli Lilly has developed a similar therapy.

The new treatment is a combination or “mixture” of two laboratory-made antibodies: infection-fighting proteins developed to bind to a part of the new coronavirus that it uses to attack human cells.

Antibodies attach to different parts of the viral spike protein, changing their structure – similar to the way a key is dropped so that it no longer fits into a lock.

Germany’s orders come at a time of growing frustration in the EU over a slower-than-expected vaccine launch.

Vaccine maker Pfizer / BioNTech and AstraZeneca have said they will ship smaller doses to Europe than anticipated in the short term due to production issues.

The German government has said it hopes to offer all Germans a jab by the end of August.

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‘You wake up well’: Amazon villagers drink grape tea to treat COVID | Instant News


PARA STATE, Brazil (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – In the middle of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, far from the laboratories of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies, the indigenous people of Kayapó in the state of Para use a drink made from vines to help them ward off the worst effects of COVID-19.

As attacks by illegal loggers and miners into the Amazon increase during the pandemic, potentially exposing forest-dwelling tribes to the virus, the Kayapó tribe say their natural treatment helps keep them safe.

The bark of the vine – a name with which the community remains secret – is boiled and strained into a tea that is drunk three times a day, for five days, explained Po Yre, a 23-year-old member of the Kayapó community. from the village of Pykany.

“The medicine is very strong. When you drink it, you become weak, sometimes with red eyes and headaches. But, the next day, it worked. You wake up fine, ”said Po Yre, who took the medicine after testing positive for COVID-19 in July.

While there is no scientific evidence that tea can fight the virus, Kayapó leaders say all members of the public should drink it as a form of prevention against COVID, which has killed nearly 200,000 Brazilians, according to official figures.

Villagers say it is the best way to prevent the pandemic from wiping out indigenous communities, which they say have limited support from the federal government.

Health experts warn that the coronavirus pandemic is endangering indigenous peoples with limited or no access to health care in the Amazon and whose communal life makes social distancing difficult.

The Amazon community was particularly hard hit in the early stages of last year’s Brazilian coronavirus pandemic.

“The (related) agencies did not act in a timely manner to protect us, making us question whether they really exist for us indigenous peoples,” said O-é Kaiapó Paiakan, daughter of iconic Kayapó leader Paulinho Paiakan, one of the pioneers of the indigenous movement. Brazil, which died of COVID-19 in June.

The government’s customary affairs agency, Funai, directs all inquiries to the Ministry of Health.

The ministry said in an emailed statement that there are more than 400 health workers monitoring and caring for the Para’s Kayapo community and the government has delivered essential supplies – such as masks and hand sanitizer – to villages.

“District professionals maintain a continuous dialogue (and) conduct home visits … with village leaders, health counselors and the general public, addressing COVID-19 preventive and protection care,” the statement said.

When the Kayapó people get sick, they usually start with traditional medicine and only switch to conventional medicine when necessary, said Dr. Douglas Rodrigues, an indigenous health specialist at the Federal University of Sao Paulo.

The Kayapó found that grape tea relieves symptoms of COVID-19, “whether because the tea has active ingredients or has a strengthening and moisturizing component,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

‘The Perfect Storm’

There are about 12,000 Kayapó in the states of Pará and Mato Grosso, according to the Instituto Socioambiental, an organization that proposes solutions to environmental and social problems in Brazil.

Among that population, there have been fewer than 20 deaths from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, according to SESAI, the government’s original health service.

While proponents of indigenous peoples say the figure is likely an underestimation, it is still significantly lower than the 2.5% death rate among Brazil’s non-indigenous population, according to statistics from the Council of National Health Secretaries.

Proponents of customary rights say rampant encroachment in the Amazon jungle by loggers, miners and farmers greatly increases the risk of villagers contracting the coronavirus from outsiders.

Rodrigo Balbueno, a biologist and consultant at the Kabu Institute, who represents the Kayapó community of Bau and Menkragnoti indigenous lands in Para state, said there had been an explosion in the number of attacks during the pandemic.

Comparing satellite images of the area from August 2020 to October 2020, Balbueno said it is possible to see new roads being built and more areas being cleared of trees – all indications of an increase in illegal logging and gold mining.

Environmentalists say encroachers have been encouraged by Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s plans to open up the Amazon to commercial mining and agriculture, which he says will lift indigenous people out of poverty.

At the same time, when Funai banned outsiders from entering customary land at the start of the pandemic, the order also stopped inspections meant to stop illegal activity in the rainforest, explained Balbueno.

“The loosening of inspections and the feeling of freedom (provided by Bolsonaro) is the perfect storm for everything we see now,” he said.

Scientists say that fighting the increasing rate of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest – a major store of carbon that warms a planet that spans nine South American countries – is critical in the fight against climate change.

LOSS OF HISTORY AND TRADITION

Even with villagers avoiding the city and drinking regular doses of wine tea, Pykatoti Village Chief Abiri Kayapó is still worried that the virus will spread.

“There are no serious cases in this village. Everyone has been treated with medicine from the forest. But I’m worried about the invasion, ”he said, walking along the trail through the forest to show medicinal plants.

Kayapó leaders have prohibited anyone in the community from disclosing the name of the plant species used in tea processing to prevent their forests from being stripped of their resources, Abiri said.

That secrecy, villagers say, is essential to ensure the pandemic does not again ravage people who hold onto the history and traditions of the community.

“COVID-19 has killed women, parents and leaders who brought with it a whole history of struggle and culture,” said O-é Kaiapó Paiakan, who is still shaken by the loss of his father.

“The elders are very important for the perpetuation of our culture. They maintain our way of life, pass down their stories for the younger generations to pass down. “

Reporting by Lucas Landau; Edited by Jumana Farouky and Laurie Goering. Please acknowledge the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the Thomson Reuters charity, covering the lives of people around the world who struggle to live free or fair. Visit news.trust.org/climate

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‘You wake up well’: Amazon villagers drink grape tea to treat COVID | Instant News


PARA STATE, Brazil (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – In the middle of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, far from the laboratories of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies, the indigenous people of Kayapó in the state of Para use a drink made from vines to help them ward off the worst effects of COVID-19.

As attacks by illegal loggers and miners into the Amazon increase during the pandemic, potentially exposing forest-dwelling tribes to the virus, the Kayapó tribe say their natural treatment helps keep them safe.

The bark of the vine – a name with which the community remains secret – is boiled and strained into a tea that is drunk three times a day, for five days, explained Po Yre, a 23-year-old member of the Kayapó community. from the village of Pykany.

“The medicine is very strong. When you drink it, you become weak, sometimes with red eyes and headaches. But, the next day, it worked. You wake up fine, ”said Po Yre, who took the medicine after testing positive for COVID-19 in July.

While there is no scientific evidence that tea can fight the virus, Kayapó leaders say all members of the public should drink it as a form of prevention against COVID, which has killed nearly 200,000 Brazilians, according to official figures.

Villagers say it is the best way to prevent the pandemic from wiping out indigenous communities, which they say have limited support from the federal government.

Health experts warn that the coronavirus pandemic is endangering indigenous peoples with limited or no access to health care in the Amazon and whose communal life makes social distancing difficult.

The Amazon community was particularly hard hit in the early stages of last year’s Brazilian coronavirus pandemic.

“The (related) agencies did not act in a timely manner to protect us, making us question whether they really exist for us indigenous peoples,” said O-é Kaiapó Paiakan, daughter of iconic Kayapó leader Paulinho Paiakan, one of the pioneers of the indigenous movement. Brazil, which died of COVID-19 in June.

The government’s customary affairs agency, Funai, directs all inquiries to the Ministry of Health.

The ministry said in an emailed statement that there are more than 400 health workers monitoring and caring for the Para’s Kayapo community and the government has delivered essential supplies – such as masks and hand sanitizer – to villages.

“District professionals maintain a continuous dialogue (and) conduct home visits … with village leaders, health counselors and the general public, addressing COVID-19 preventive and protection care,” the statement said.

When the Kayapó people get sick, they usually start with traditional medicine and only switch to conventional medicine when necessary, said Dr. Douglas Rodrigues, an indigenous health specialist at the Federal University of Sao Paulo.

The Kayapó found that grape tea relieves symptoms of COVID-19, “whether because the tea has active ingredients or has a strengthening and moisturizing component,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

‘The Perfect Storm’

There are about 12,000 Kayapó in the states of Pará and Mato Grosso, according to the Instituto Socioambiental, an organization that proposes solutions to environmental and social problems in Brazil.

Among that population, there have been fewer than 20 deaths from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, according to SESAI, the government’s original health service.

While proponents of indigenous peoples say the figure is likely an underestimation, it is still significantly lower than the 2.5% death rate among Brazil’s non-indigenous population, according to statistics from the Council of National Health Secretaries.

Proponents of customary rights say rampant encroachment in the Amazon jungle by loggers, miners and farmers greatly increases the risk of villagers contracting the coronavirus from outsiders.

Rodrigo Balbueno, a biologist and consultant at the Kabu Institute, who represents the Kayapó community of Bau and Menkragnoti indigenous lands in Para state, said there had been an explosion in the number of attacks during the pandemic.

Comparing satellite images of the area from August 2020 to October 2020, Balbueno said it is possible to see new roads being built and more areas being cleared of trees – all indications of an increase in illegal logging and gold mining.

Environmentalists say encroachers have been encouraged by Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s plans to open up the Amazon to commercial mining and agriculture, which he says will lift indigenous people out of poverty.

At the same time, when Funai banned outsiders from entering customary land at the start of the pandemic, the order also stopped inspections meant to stop illegal activity in the rainforest, explained Balbueno.

“The loosening of inspections and the feeling of freedom (provided by Bolsonaro) is the perfect storm for everything we see now,” he said.

Scientists say that fighting the increasing rate of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest – a major store of carbon that warms a planet that spans nine South American countries – is critical in the fight against climate change.

LOSS OF HISTORY AND TRADITION

Even with villagers avoiding the city and drinking regular doses of wine tea, Pykatoti Village Chief Abiri Kayapó is still worried that the virus will spread.

“There are no serious cases in this village. Everyone has been treated with medicine from the forest. But I’m worried about the invasion, ”he said, walking along the trail through the forest to show medicinal plants.

Kayapó leaders have prohibited anyone in the community from disclosing the name of the plant species used in tea processing to prevent their forests from being stripped of their resources, Abiri said.

That secrecy, villagers say, is essential to ensure the pandemic does not again ravage people who hold onto the history and traditions of the community.

“COVID-19 has killed women, parents and leaders who brought with it a whole history of struggle and culture,” said O-é Kaiapó Paiakan, who is still shaken by the loss of his father.

“The elders are very important for the perpetuation of our culture. They maintain our way of life, pass down their stories for the younger generations to pass down. “

Reporting by Lucas Landau; Edited by Jumana Farouky and Laurie Goering. Please acknowledge the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the Thomson Reuters charity, covering the lives of people around the world who struggle to live free or fair. Visit news.trust.org/climate

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100% of the population in the 6 district KPs receive free medical facilities | Instant News


PESHAWAR: Prime Minister Mahmood on Friday officially launched the third phase of the extension of the Health Card Plus Scheme to the entire population of the province.

Apart from provincial cabinet members and government officials, members of parliament and the media attend special ceremonies organized for this purpose.

Under the third phase, the scheme has expanded to 100 percent of the population in six districts, including Peshawar, Mardan, Charsadda, Swabi, Nowshera and Haripur, said an official leaflet.

With the completion of the third phase of outreach, 10.4 million residents of the district will be provided with free medical care at registered public and private sector hospitals.

It should be noted that in the first two phases of counseling, the Health Card Plus was given to all residents of the Hazara and Malakand areas.

Responding to the launch event as the main guest, the main minister called the Card Plus Health Scheme as the current government’s flagship program and initiative of the poor.

He said the extension of the scheme for the entire population of the province was an important step towards Prime Minister Imran Khan’s vision of the welfare state, adding that the scheme would ensure the provision of free care facilities to all people in the province without discrimination. .

Mahmood khan said by the end of January 2021, the scheme would roll out to a percent of the population across the province, adding that the government spends around 18.00 billion rupees on the scheme annually.

He said the scheme had been extended to 100 percent of the population in the newly merged district but with a lower coverage of Rs. 600,000 per household per year.

Mahmood Khan announced that from the new fiscal year, the annual coverage of Rs 600,000 for the combined districts will also be increased to one million rupees to match the completed districts. He stated that for the greater benefit of the provincial community, the KP government has decided to get kidney and liver transplants under the Health Card Scheme.

“Sehat Card Plus is a scheme that is not only intended for free medical treatment but is a complete package of social protection,” he said.

He added, in addition to providing free medical facilities to the community, the scheme would help reduce poverty in the province and improve people’s lives.

Previously, when responding to the inauguration ceremony, the Minister of Health KP, Taimur Saleem Jhagra said that with the expansion of the scheme to all residents of the Malakand and Hazara areas, patient admissions at the Malakand and Hazara regional government hospitals have increased.

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Pancreatic cancer: New Zealand’s first treatment to prolong a patient’s life | Instant News


Miriam Walter saw the tumor in her pancreas shrank 73 percent thanks to new technology. Photo / Provided

Miriam Walter was told she would not last to see this Christmas when she was diagnosed with incurable pancreatic cancer a year ago.

But thanks to the radical new treatment, which is benefiting the country for the first time, the 72-year-old feels “just fine” and wants to celebrate the summer with his family.

The OncoSil device, developed by an Australian medical technology company, extends and even saves patient lives and has been successfully used at Waikato Hospital three times this year to treat people with inoperable, advanced stage pancreatic cancer.

Only 8 percent of pancreatic cancer patients in New Zealand survive longer than five years and only 10 percent are diagnosed early enough for surgery – the only curative treatment.

The disease kills more than 500 Kiwis a year and is projected to become the fourth largest killer in the country by 2025.

The device, recently received regulatory approval in New Zealand, allows radiation-containing micro-particles to be injected directly into tumors via ultrasound-guided endoscopy – a form of brachytherapy.

Pancreatic cancer kills more than 500 Kiwis a year.  Image / 123rf
Pancreatic cancer kills more than 500 Kiwis a year. Image / 123rf

The full dose of radiation is released from the particles over 80 days and causes far less damage to surrounding organs than standard radiation therapy in which a beam of radiation is directed at the cancer from outside the body.

Walter said he went to the doctor when the whites of his eyes turned yellow and was diagnosed with inoperable pancreatic cancer in early November.

“I was told, without any treatment, I might have about three months to live,” he said.

Walter immediately started chemotherapy and was on vacation with his family when the clinical director of gastroenterology at Waikato Hospital, Dr Frank Weilert called to tell him about OncoSil in January. At the end of that month he began receiving treatment.

“It’s just a better choice. That or do nothing and see what chemo does,” he said.

“I’m quite proud of the fact that I took the courage to be number one so that others can benefit from it.”

Walter said he had no side effects and scans showed the tumor had shrunk by 73 percent.

Since then, her tumor has remained stable as she continues chemotherapy treatment.

“Chemotherapy is what keeps me like this. I’m fine. I drive, go to the shop, go to the beach, socialize with my friends,” he said.

“It’s not all doom and gloom. Life goes on and that’s how it is.”

Weilert said that, despite its success, surgery might not have been an option for Walter because of his age and other health problems.

But two to three months after having performed the procedure on the other two patients, at least one is being considered for surgery although it is too early to make a decision, he said.

“It’s obviously very exciting to do something new. It’s more exciting because we’ve seen great results,” Weilert said.

The history of pancreatic cancer is so “dire” that patients usually present with advanced disease and few are offered surgery.

“For pancreatic cancer, this is a very promising technology that will give hope to patients who have little hope when you get this diagnosis. You get this diagnosis and you often plan your last Christmas. It’s very, very devastating.”

Trials have shown the treatment reduces tumors to an operable size in a quarter of patients and 20 percent of patients receive surgery to completely remove the tumor, he said.

Weilert, the only doctor in New Zealand to use the device, said the new treatment offered a possible cure or at least an extension of life for patients who were, on average, given six months to live after diagnosis.

“This gives our patients more hope than we have recently had with such devastating cancer,” he said.

“The interesting thing about OncoSil is the beta radiation so it doesn’t emit too far from where the device is being sent, preventing additional damage.”

He said patients treated so far in New Zealand, including Walter, have shown few side effects and they are consistent with the chemotherapy they have received.

Miram Walter, with her husband John Walter and their family earlier this year, celebrated the couple's golden wedding anniversary.  Photo / Provided
Miram Walter, with her husband John Walter and their family earlier this year, celebrated the couple’s golden wedding anniversary. Photo / Provided

Weilert said the device also has the potential to change the current standard of treatment by being given earlier in the treatment process because there is evidence to suggest that it increases the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

Gut Cancer Foundation chief executive Liam Willis said while OncoSil sounds like an interesting concept and appears to be a new approach to the delivery of radiation therapy, it is still an experimental idea that has not been fully reported.

He said it appeared safe and promising enough to take him to a phase three clinical trial that would determine if it was any better than current chemotherapy treatment and external beam radiotherapy in those with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

“The Gut Cancer Foundation does not consider this approach a new standard of care until such studies are conducted and the risks and benefits are better understood.”

Patients treated so far have received funds from the company for compassionate reasons but from now on patients will have to pay about $ 30,000 for treatment until the company can obtain it.

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