Tag Archives: trip

Bring it Home: Colorado | Trip | Instant News



Who and where • Denny and Bonnie Coleman of Warson Woods and their son Michael of Fort Collins, Colo. In Mesa Verde National Park, Colo. The Trip • They made it to the National Park in October 2020. Travel Tip • Give yourself plenty of time to enjoy the trails and many historic sites. If you are traveling to this part of the country, be sure to visit Durango, Ouray, and Telluride. Fall is a great time to visit as aspens are in color. Contribute • Email your photo to [email protected] Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including their origin and location in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little more about the trip and travel advice. We are looking for interesting, well-composed, well-lit photos. .



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Brood X’s cicadas will not spawn in the north; journey down state required to experience massive emergence | Local News | Instant News


TRAVERSE CITY – A large X brood of cicadas will emerge from the ground after 17 years and start crying trees – but in the north, residents must travel down to enjoy the thrill. with the big clutches, ”said entomologist Duke Elsner, retired Michigan State University Extension educator. Northern Michigan has annual cicadas that come out in cycles each year, a different brood each year for four or five years. “Basically there isn’t enough of it to be really loud,” Elsner said. Annual cicadas are larger and usually black with undertones of green and white, he said, but without the characteristic red eyes of periodic cicadas that emerge by the millions after The Brood X phenomenon – pronounced Brood 10 – will return in parts of southern Michigan this year, scientists say, mostly along the southern state border as well as in Jackson and Washtenaw counties. There are periodic 17 year old cicadas in the Traverse City area and people there will have to travel to Ann Arbor or further south of the United States if they are to experience this mass emergence, ” said Gary Parsons, head of the Arthropod collection at MSU. Research Collection and Director of the MSU Bug House.Cicadas are a type of insect that is distinguished from other species or insects by having their mouthparts modified into the shape of a slender, hinged beak to suck fluids, a-t- he declares. but are not toxic or injurious to people or animals. “Cicadas do not bite and are harmless to humans and property – other than being a nuisance. They can pile up in millions in parks, woods and neighborhoods and seemingly be everywhere. When they’re this plentiful, they fly, land and crawl all over the place, including sometimes landing on humans, ”Parsons said. Female cicadas insert and lay their eggs in thin twigs of trees and shrubs after mating. “When the tiny nymphs hatch, they drop to the ground, burrowing into the ground, then find a root to suck in fluids for the next 13 or 17. Parsons said. The university scientist said Brood X is the largest and most widespread brood in the United States, and the only periodic brood that emerges in Michigan. “As far as I know, the only population that still exists in Michigan is down around Ann Arbor, ”Parsons said. After this year, Brood X won’t reappear until 2038, he said. cycles, due to global warming trends. Insects typically emerge when the soil temperature is 64 degrees and after a rain.Climate Central, a nonprofit news organization that analyzes and reports on climate science, has calculated average soil temperatures across the country. area of ​​emergence of Brood X. It is estimated that Brood X cicadas will emerge between five and 10 days – even up to 15 days or more in parts of the range – earlier than in previous cycles, scientists from the group said. Counties expected to see the bulk of Brood X’s emergence include Branch, Jackson, and St. Joseph, according to a US Forest Service map of planned activity this year. Other sources also include parts of Berrien, Cass, Hillsdale and Washtenaw counties in the cicada landing zone. .



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Central Oregon poised for robust summer season | Local and State | Instant News


Money in the bank, rising vaccination rates, and the temptation of the outdoors all work together to attract visitors to summer travel to central Oregon. Already, resorts and hotels are filling up as travelers plan their summer trips. Most of these travelers come by car, according to the Automobile Association of America. There is pent-up demand, according to AAA, for road trips, whether it’s to get away from it all or just to see loved ones, but the situation isn’t all rosy for companies looking to re-engage. after a year of closings and reopenings. There is a labor shortage in the hospitality industry and businesses juggle their needs with changing government demands to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus as Deschutes County goes from a risk level to another. moderate to high risk, which limits the number of people inside to 25% of capacity.However, Bend is among Oregon’s most popular driving destinations, said Marie Dodds, director of government and AAA Public Affairs, in an email. Travel will also be encouraged by the recent announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that fully vaccinated people can visit other fully vaccinated people without a mask or by maintaining a distance of 6 feet. plans to take family trips by car, and we’re also seeing a comeback as air travel bounces back, ”Dodds said. “Others are planning tailor-made trips. And many just want to travel to see loved ones and friends they weren’t able to see during the pandemic. Central Oregon is perfect for a physically remote getaway with its hiking, mountain biking and water sports, said Tony DeBone, Deschutes County Commission Chairman: With approximately 500 accommodations to book, the Sunriver Resort says it There has been a noticeable increase in booking requests from family travelers. Summer has traditionally been the busiest time of year for the resort; there were many activities that had to be halted at the start of the pandemic. “As the summer looks to be very busy, we are seeing a much shorter term demand right now,” said Lindsay Borkowski, Director of Sales and Marketing for Sunriver Resort. “We believe this will continue throughout the summer, as our customers can’t wait to travel again.” With more money in travelers’ pockets, more people will hit the road, said Damon Runberg, regional economist with the Oregon Department of Employment. This is particularly serious now, as more vaccines are rolled out to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus, making people feel more comfortable traveling. “Travel expenses are a popular form of discretionary spending,” Runberg said. “Travel and tourism destinations accessible by car and offering more dispersed forms of recreation are likely to be more attractive to many this summer.” At the height of the pandemic just over a year ago, the town of Bend issued travel restrictions that lasted from mid-March to mid-October. Despite these restrictions, many travelers came to Bend last summer, said Kevney Dugan, CEO of Visit Bend. Hotel occupancy in the area fell at the start of the pandemic, but slowly rebounded last summer. , according to STR, a global travel analysis company. The occupancy rate of hotels during spring break this year was 77.6%, according to the data. During the week of March 21-28, during government-ordered COVID-19 shutdowns, it dropped to 19.9%. A comparison of hotel occupancy this spring break versus 2019 shows a 9% increase, said Dugan. “There is a lot of pent-up demand that will be released when people get vaccinated and can start traveling again,” Dugan said. “Destinations like Bend, where you can play outside all day, are a desirable type of travel. Weeks before the start of summer, Tumalo Creek and Kayak in the Old Mill neighborhood have been busy answering calls from potential visitors looking to book tours, boats and boards, said Sue Fox, a manager of the store. . “We definitely put people on the water and got calls about renting all kinds of equipment,” Fox said. “We anticipate that we will be busy this summer.” As the company begins to add staff, it may have difficulty finding qualified employees, said Todd Montgomery, director of the Oregon State University-Cascades residential hotel management program, who leads the program. The hospitality and recreation sector has been hit the hardest in terms of unemployment, according to labor reports produced by the Oregon Department of Employment. While other sectors of the economy have regained jobs lost due to closures linked to the pandemic, the leisure and hospitality sector has continued to lag. on the economy. That’s because many companies have chosen to let almost all of their staff go during closures related to the pandemic, Montgomery said. “It’s a national problem, but is definitely applicable to our community,” Montgomery said. “The labor shortage at Bend could be the worst we’ve ever seen in the travel industry.” At Tumalo Creek and Kayak, business will be near normal this summer, Fox said. Inner tube rentals will resume, boats and kayaks will be for rent and reservations will be required, Fox said. “It will be more normal than last year,” Fox said. “We won’t be doing our tours and events, but we will have on-site classes and a kids’ camp.” Keeping everyone outside will go a long way in keeping the community safe, DeBone said. But DeBone offered this advice: “Please come have fun and be respectful of the space,” he said. “Be respectful of each other and be in a crowded environment.” .



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What you need to know about travel costs during and after the pandemic | Smart change: personal finance | Instant News



Retirement is known as the “golden age” for a reason. If well planned, retirement can be fun, social and relaxing. However, the enjoyment of retirement largely depends on where one ends up living. And, for many, the West Coast is the ideal. Here you will find natural beauties, bustling cities, good hospitals, a comfortable climate and much more. But which areas of California, Washington, and Oregon are best for retirees? Wonder No More: Stacker has compiled a list of the 50 Best Places to Retire on the West Coast. While the majority of these locations are in California, it’s worth noting that the California Dream can be tricky for retirees. It is a notoriously expensive condition. The American Community Survey of the US Census Bureau showed a poverty rate of 10.5% among California seniors in 2020. To combat this problem, the state government in 2019 launched CalSavers, a program of retirement savings for those for whom employers do not offer such accounts. State officials also discussed improving access to food stamps for the elderly and making it easier to obtain Medi-Cal. Given all of this, it’s clear that depending on where you live, the ability to comfortably retire in California often hinges on one thing: financial wealth. For those who can afford it, California boasts a high life expectancy, a wide array of sights and attractions, coastal living, and year-round access to the outdoors. The good news for people on fixed incomes or low incomes is that Oregon and Washington also have many attractive options, usually more affordable. For this list, only cities and suburbs in California, Oregon and Washington were taken into account. The data was collected from the 2020 Niche rankings, which were based on the number of retirees in a given field; weather; access to health care; restaurants and other amenities; crime rate; and entertainment options. What makes each of these cities great for retirees? Read on to find out. You May Also Like: The Best Small Towns for Retirees in America.



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Governor Whitmer’s aide travels to Florida despite governor’s travel warning | Instant News



DETROIT – Gov. aide Gretchen Whitmer sparked controversy after she posted family photos of her and her family on social media at a beach in Florida as the assistant acted against Whitmer’s advice about travel in the middle of the Michigan coronavirus outbreak. April 10, 2021: Michigan coronavirus cases up to 738,023; The photos of Whitmer’s director of operations, Tricia Foster, in the Florida Keys, were discovered on Friday.In response, the governor’s office said Foster was fully vaccinated and could travel safely as directed by the CDC and from the MDHHS, but the photos come just days after Whitmer warned against traveling to Florida during spring break. The CDC said fully vaccinated people can travel the country without having to go through a test before or after the trip, and that those who are fully vaccinated and travel do not have to self-quarantine when they return, but the trip is called hypocrisy by opponents of Whitmer. Read: Michigan urges them Spring Break travelers to get tested for COVID, offers pop-up sitesThe co-chair of the Michigan Republican Party tweeted to the governor that her “rules are so horrible” on her for ” open this state! ” Michigan currently does not have a travel ban, and businesses are not currently closed due to pandemic orders. Additionally, Whitmer’s emergency powers were revoked in October and COVID decisions are currently being made by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. AdFoster’s photos appeared to have been removed from their Facebook page. The governor’s office did not say whether there would be any consequences for the high-ranking aid. Copyright 2021 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved. .



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