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Heard the President of New Zealand Will Resign in September | Instant News


New Zealand Hearing President, Tony Rush, has just announced his intention to resign from that role on 15 September 2020. The recent decline in health means it is increasingly difficult for him to do full justice to that role.

Tony Rush – Hearing the President of New Zealand

“It’s better for someone younger and more energy to take over,” Rush said. “The past three and a half years as president has been an extraordinary challenge. The people I work with have been inspiring and fun, but I know it’s time to go. “

Board member Theona Blom from Rakaia will become interim president until the next RUPS in May 2021 and Colin Bond from Dannevirke, his deputy. Theona is a dairy farmer but an accountant and business analyst who qualifies in her home country, South Africa. He volunteered four years ago to become the Treasurer of the Christchurch Hearing Association as a way to give back to the community he adopted, and was immediately elected as a board member in New Zealand as a representative of the South Island.

“I am very confident that the new government team from September will do an extraordinary job to lead this extraordinary organization,” Rush concluded.

Both Blom and Bond would like to thank Tony for his service to Hearing New Zealand for the past few years. “Tony resigned when Hearing the President of New Zealand come with an incredible sense of loss, not only to his colleagues but also to the deaf community. In a relatively short period of time as President, he had led with wisdom and empathy. He has laid a strong foundation for Listening to New Zealand going forward. Tony, your wealth of knowledge and sense of humor will be missed. May our best wishes accompany you and your family “.

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Stroke Will Pay New Zealand $ 1.1 Billion This Year | Instant News


Strokes will cost 1.1 billion New Zealand dollars this year, according to a report released today by the Stroke Foundation of New Zealand. Research completed by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) confirms that a stroke has a significant impact on life expectancy and quality of life, and at current levels it is likely to cost New Zealand $ 1.7 billion by 2038.

The study was published in 2018[1]

estimates a 40 percent increase in the number of strokes in New Zealand over the next decade. “But the NZIER study shows a 24 percent increase in the number of strokes in the last three years,” said Mark Vivian, CEO of the Stroke Foundation. The report estimates 11,169 New Zealanders will have a stroke this year.

The Stroke Foundation is concerned that very little is being done to prevent strokes.

“I am surprised that the annual financial costs for this country are very high, but even conservative research shows 75 percent of strokes can be prevented. The government doesn’t do much in the prevention room, “Vivian said.

The New Zealand government spends less than three percent of its health budget on public health prevention services. “The Stroke Foundation committed 13 percent of our budget last year to stroke prevention initiatives. We call on the next government to increase its commitment to disease prevention to 5 percent by 2023, to reduce the heavy social and economic burden caused by stroke to New Zealand. “

High blood pressure is the biggest risk factor that can be prevented for stroke. Last year, the Stroke Foundation gave nearly 24,000 New Zealanders free blood pressure checks. About one percent of those tested had very high results that day so they were referred to medical services for immediate follow-up. The Stroke Foundation estimates that this alone saves $ 2.25 million in health costs.

Vivian explained: “We do not receive government money to support our stroke prevention program, but if we are funded to provide 50,000 free blood pressure checks per year, we estimate this will save $ 10 million in health costs.”

While 75 percent of strokes occur in people over 65 years of age, for Māori and Pacific people, almost 60 percent of strokes occur at ages 15 and 65 years. for themselves while reducing the burden of stroke in these communities, “Vivian said.

In this past financial year, the Foundation has a total operating cost of $ 5 million.

A summary report on the Stroke Foundation can be found here.

The full NZIER report can be found here.

[1]

The New Zealand Medical Journal (2018), https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal-articles/projected-stroke-volumes-to-provide-a-10-year-direction-for-new-zealand-stroke-services

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Zimbabwean Rural School Library Believe New Zealand Lottery Will Be Taken at the African Fashion Show | Instant News


That Zimbabwe Rural Schools Library Trust (ZRSLT) New Zealand Lottery to determine the winners of the $ 500 Miter 10 Prize Voucher and international music CD will be taken at the African Fashion Show, Miss Rotorua Contestant fundraising event for Parkinson’s Central Plateau NZ, on August 8, 2020 in Rotorua , New Zealand. Rotorua Multicultural Council President Margriet Theron will draw.

Tickets are sold at $ 5 and are closed on Fridays. The money raised will be used for sending learning resources to Zimbabwe. ZRSLT New Zealand Treasurer Tariro Kamutingondo encouraged supporters and sympathizers to buy tickets or donate money to support initiatives to bring reading material to underprivileged rural school children in Zimbabwe.

“We call on all people living in New Zealand who recognize the importance of providing reading material for rural underprivileged children in Zimbabwe to enter the lottery where they can win a $ 500 Miter Voucher while helping children access learning resources “, Said Kamutingongo.

Prize vouchers, the first prize in the draw, were donated to the trust by Miter 10 after the cancellation of hissing sausages that could be held at the Miter 10 store at The Base in Hamilton on April 11, 2020, but were unable to proceed as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic. The International Music CD is a Trust production and includes music from musicians based in Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Zimbabwe.

“We thank Miter 10 for showing that they are a truly socially responsible business, therefore our call to the public to support the movement,” Kamutingondo said, adding that the Trust now lacks $ 2,000 to send a 20 foot container to Zimbabwe.

This will be the third time the Trust will send books to Zimbabwe, and schools that have received resources from the Trust say these resources have helped improve assessment results, but there are many underprivileged schools that need similar support.

The Zimbabwe Rural Schools Library Trust is registered with Charities Services in New Zealand and has a memorandum of understanding with the Zimbabwe Rural Schools Library Trust which distributes resources to decent rural schools in Zimbabwe.

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Air New Zealand Domestic Schedule Rises | Instant News


Air New Zealand has increased its domestic schedule for August to 70 percent from pre-COVID-19 levels.

The airline has planned to operate around 55 percent of its usual domestic capacity (compared to pre-COVID-19 levels) during August.

Air New Zealand Networks General Manager Scott Carr said the airline was very surprised by the demand for domestic travel.

“As a result of the request, we have added or increased more than 400 one-way flights in August. This includes operating 408 additional one-way flights and 18 flights upgraded to larger aircraft. “

The following domestic routes will see additional flights or improvements in August –

Auckland to / from Christchurch to / from Wellington to / from

Christchurch

Nelson

Queenstown

Wellington

Dunedin

Hamilton

Invercargill

Nelson

New Plymouth

Palmerston North

Queenstown

Tauranga

Wellington

Blenheim

Dunedin

Hamilton

Napier

Nelson

New Plymouth

Queenstown

Tauranga

Timaru

Earlier this week Air New Zealand online credit tool airing allows customers who hold direct credit with the airline to manage their credit online.

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The Novel Approach Enables Increased Capability For Autism Research In New Zealand | Instant News


Big Data Themes Early Challenges National Science has developed a method to identify children and adolescents in the autism / Takiwātanga spectrum using health data in the Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI).

This method allows research to better understand the lives of children and adolescents in Aotearoa / New Zealand on the autism spectrum. Researchers can use this approach to examine changes in service use over time and variations in life outcomes for people in the autism spectrum, and their families.

While increasingly associated with forces such as visual thinking, logic, and memory, autism can also have variable effects on adaptive functions. Previous studies have found it might be related to intellectual disability, estimated to affect 31 percent of individuals; mental health condition, 70 percent of individuals; and other medical conditions such as epilepsy, constipation, and sleep problems. International estimates show that the prevalence of autism is on the rise with recent research from the United States which shows 1 in 54 children have autism. There is growing interest in autism research in New Zealand, but a significant vacuum in quantitative data.

The research team used diagnostic information from three health data sets held at IDI to identify autism among children and adolescents (aged 0-24 years) in New Zealand. The resulting case identification method was then applied to the corresponding population estimates in New Zealand for 2015/16.

This study shows the potential value and limitations of using IDI data for autism research. Data analysis yielded an autism identification rate of 1 in 102 eight-year-old children, which means it is possible and understandable that IDI-based case identification methods reduce the number of autism cases among comparable ages by around 40 percent. It is very convincing that the relative levels of cross-gender and ethnic groups are consistent with international and national estimates. Autism is more common in men than women and in ethnic New Zealand European individuals than in the population of Māori and Pasifika.

Further application of this method reveals the complexity of autism with 68% having co-occurring mental health or neurodiverse related conditions, including 30% with intellectual disabilities, 30% with behavioral problems (eg ADHD) and 28% with anxiety and / or depression.

From a rare diagnosis 30 years ago, autism became very prominent. Children and young people on the autism spectrum now exist throughout our schools and communities. We need data to help understand what and where are gaps in access to services and use of services.

“We cannot begin to provide adequate support at school or family unless we know the size and complexity of this problem,” said lead researcher Nicholas Bowden. “IDI has the potential to become a valuable resource for autism research and help fill this gap,” he said.

Publication of this research in the journal Autism: International Journal of Research and Practice will provide valuable information for those working in autism, government, school and health systems policies to help provide appropriate support.

“We recognize that New Zealand needs to do better in the field of understanding autism,” said Professor Wayne Cutfield, Director of the Better National Science Challenge. “The government wants to do better, however, we need an evidence base.”

“New Zealand Autism is increasingly in demand for New Zealand domiciled in autism research. This work provides a structured approach to autism research specifically for New Zealand that enables more efficient and effective research, “said Dane Dougan, CEO of Autism New Zealand.

Nicholas Bowden said: “I am aware of the problem of discrimination and lack of understanding of children and adolescents regarding the spectrum of autism, and the challenges associated with inclusion and participation.”

“Hopes and hopes are that IDI will become a valuable resource for autism research, which can be used to contribute to better understanding. While autism research is still relatively new to me, I am honored to have extraordinary researchers who support me, some of whom have devoted much of their lives to advocating autism and autism research. I am sure that our research will make a difference, “he said

A number of other research projects are ongoing that use the case identification method developed. For example, a paper is currently being reviewed that examines the use of children’s and adolescent drugs on the autism spectrum, and how this differs from those who are not autistic. A further study is investigating how education-based support for those in the autism spectrum reduces school exclusion, suspension and stand-down rates. There is great potential and a number of other occupations are being discussed.

Read journal articles: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1362361320939329

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