Tag Archives: Vegetables

Generations: Making smart food choices | Lifestyle | Instant News


PROBLEMS GETTING YOUR HAIR BRUSH? HERE ARE QUICK TIPS FROM DAILY ACTIVE LIFE: Use foam hot water pipe insulation to wrap the brush handle. Glue it in place to make it fit. If the hole diameter or overall size is too large / large, cut the foam. Then, attach it tighter before recording. The foam creates a non-slip grip that can be held with minimal force. The enlarged size allows you to hold the grip more comfortably with a slight bend of your finger. If you found this quick tip helpful and would like access to more tips like this one, visit the Generations website at www.generationsnetwork.org and click the Active Everyday Living link on the homepage. Active Daily Living offers FREE personal advice on improving health, independence, and aging. Here you can access videos, articles and resources tailored to your needs on a variety of topics focusing on older adults and caregivers.

MAKE A SMART FOOD CHOICE FOR HEALTHY AGING: It’s never too late to make smarter food choices. Eating healthy is an important part of staying healthy as you get older.

The following tips can help you maintain a healthy weight, get the nutrients you need, and lower your risk of chronic disease. (National Institute of Aging, nia.nih.gov)

• Try to eat and drink from this food group every day: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein, and milk. Variety is an important part of eating healthy!

• Cut back on foods and drinks that are high in calories and add sugar, sodium and saturated fat. Instead, switch to healthier options like fresh fruit and vegetables.

• Instead of high-calorie snacks, such as potato chips, try nutrient-dense snacks, such as carrots.

• Instead of fruit products with added sugar, such as figs, try fresh fruit, such as peaches.

• Instead of regular cola, try fruit or vegetable flavored water.

• Use a food diary to help you track total daily calories, carbohydrates, protein, etc., and see if you are making healthy choices. Understand how many calories you need based on your daily activity level.

• Choose a variety of foods that are packed with nutrients and low in calories.

• Check food labels to understand what foods will meet your nutritional needs on a daily basis.

GENERATIONS STILL SELLING PECANS: The Generation’s Retirement and Senior Volunteer Program still has pecans to sell! This pecan is fresh from Georgia from the newest pecan plant. It costs $ 10 per bag with a choice of 12 oz. a bag of small pieces, or 12 oz. bag parts. Money raised from this sales support project which benefits our local community such as Children’s Vision Screening, Little Elf Workshops, Love-A-Bears, Pet Pad Program, etc. Please call Generations at 1-800-742-9002 to arrange ride purchases and pickups. We are located in the Zella Young Building on the campus of the University of Vincennes, 1019 N 4th St., Vincennes, IN. Please call the office when you arrive and a staff member will bring your pecans for you. Thank you!

MAGAZINE GENERATION: Our magazine is aimed at adults in pre-retirement and retirement and promotes active aging and preventive health. It is published three times a year and is free for subscribers. All we need is your name and address. If you’d like to receive magazines in the future, call Brenda Hancock at 812-888-5146 or [email protected].

Generations, Area 13 Aging & Disability Aging, is a program of Vincennes University’s Division of Public Service. Our agency connects individuals and caregivers to community resources and options for long-term care and home services. For more information, call 1-800-742-9002 or 812-888-5880 or visit our website at www.generationsnetwork.org

.



image source

Demographic data will be collected during the Saturday food distribution | Grand Island Local News | Instant News


This month’s drive-thru food kitchen move on Grand Island is planned for a Saturday in Fonner Park by Tom Dinsdale Automotive Cattle Barn.

Food distribution will start at 9:30 am. Address at 700 E. Stolley Park Road.

Trinity United Methodist Church, with assistance from the First Presbyterian Church and others, will run the monthly Loaves & Fishes food bank. When arriving, use the Fonner Park entrance from South Locust Street. Asked that people do not come before 9 am

Drivers must remain in their vehicles and wear masks for safety. There are no appointments and no identification required. There are also no income requirements.

This month, at the request of the Food Bank for the Heartland, Loaves & Fishes will collect some information when people receive their food. Volunteers will ask how many people live in your house, how many are under 18, how many are between 19 and 64 and how many are over 65. They will also ask for the family’s zip code and if this is their first time receiving food from Loaves & Fishes.

Each vehicle will receive a 28-pound packaging box filled with various durable staples such as peanut butter, rice, beans, canned fruits and vegetables, etc. Fresh produce and other items will be offered.

.



image source

Burdened by pandemic curbs, demand for sustainable food grows | Local Business News | Instant News


At the start of the pandemic, health workers were showered with gift baskets, parades, joyous roadside signs and impressive F-16 fly-bys at the hospital. However, those expressions of gratitude have faded and been hospitalized as COVID-19 and virus-related deaths continued. As Jake Henry Jr., president and CEO of Saint Francis Health Systems, noted, these frontline heroes were “exhausted after wearing personal protective gear to repeatedly busy 12-hour shifts. “When they got into the car and came home, they were completely exhausted,” Henry said. “When they enter into unmasked apathy in public places – shops, restaurants and public gatherings – they feel defeated.”

Read more about why we honor local health care workers as Tulsans of the Year.

Photo above: Frontline worker James Burns, RN, BSN, Saint Francis Health Systems (left); Head of the Tulsa Fire Service Michael Baker; Head of the Department of Health’s Division of Prevention, Preparedness and Response, Tulsa Kelly VanBuskirk; Respiratory Therapist Brittany Ullrich from Ascension St. John Medical Center; Tulsa Health Department Executive Director Bruce Dart; Kayla Stack, EMSA medic and recipient of the 2020 Star of Life award; Guy Sneed, chief medical officer of the Hillcrest HealthCare System; Nick Coffman, EMSA paramedic; Kelsey Two Bears, a certified physician assistant at the Sapulpa Indian Health Center of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health, stands outside the Tulsa Central Library.

.



image source

From farm to table: The pandemic is driving consumers towards more food security | Local Business News | Instant News


At the start of the pandemic, health workers were showered with gift baskets, parades, joyous roadside signs and impressive F-16 fly-bys at the hospital. However, those expressions of gratitude have faded and been hospitalized as COVID-19 and virus-related deaths continued. As Jake Henry Jr., president and CEO of Saint Francis Health Systems, noted, these frontline heroes were “exhausted after wearing personal protective gear to repeatedly busy 12-hour shifts. “When they got into the car and came home, they were completely exhausted,” Henry said. “When they enter into unmasked apathy in public places – shops, restaurants and public gatherings – they feel defeated.”

Read more about why we honor local health care workers as Tulsans of the Year.

Photo above: Frontline worker James Burns, RN, BSN, Saint Francis Health Systems (left); Head of the Tulsa Fire Service Michael Baker; Tulsa Health Department Head of Prevention, Preparedness and Response Division Kelly VanBuskirk; Respiratory Therapist Brittany Ullrich from Ascension St. John Medical Center; Tulsa Health Department Executive Director Bruce Dart; Kayla Stack, EMSA medic and recipient of the 2020 Star of Life award; Guy Sneed, chief medical officer of the Hillcrest HealthCare System; Nick Coffman, EMSA paramedic; Kelsey Two Bears, a certified physician assistant at the Sapulpa Indian Health Center of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health, stands outside the Tulsa Central Library.

.



image source

Long Food Line, But Food Imports, Kitchen Appliances Increase 10-30% | Instant News


Monthly tomato imports increased by 25.31%. Blueberry and other berry imports rose 28.62%, when compared with the same month last year.

Cucumber imports increased 15.28% in October, the latest data available from the US government, when compared to the previous October. This is at a time when US imports as a whole are increasing by 0.04%.

Lemon, lime, orange and others orange up 22.79%. Watermelon and other melons increased 57.37%, when compared to the previous October.

Categories, which include peppers, asparagus and pumpkin, rose 14.25%. Assorted nuts, lentils and chickpeas, up 18.85%. Pig, up 18.05%.

It’s at a time when tens of thousands of less fortunate Americans wait in their cars for hours in long food lines, as food banks struggle to keep up with demand.

I don’t think these fruit and vegetable imports find their way into the food bank. And they certainly didn’t find their way to the restaurants, which were mostly closed or operating at considerably reduced capacity.

It is almost certainly true that this is making its way to the kitchens of our homes.

Some other October data, data showing both our homes and the upside impact of the stock market, seem to confirm that.

Although not all fruit, vegetable and meat categories have increased sharply, some imports of kitchen utensils are performing quite well.

The category that includes imported refrigerators and freezers increased 38.05% in October. Categories dominated by oven and gas stove increased 44.50% while the category was included electric stove and ranges increased 20.87% in October, with electric stoves actually increasing 60.86% and microwaves better than 33%. Dishwasher imports rose 37.09%.

And with all the fruit and vegetables that lead to leftovers, even aluminum foil imports increased in October, 19.90%, when compared to the previous October.

.



image source