Tag Archives: warning

Wild weather: Severe thunderstorm warnings issued for parts of South Island, strong winds for central North Island | Instant News


Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Severe thunderstorm warnings have been issued tonight for the Canterbury Plains and North Otago, accompanied by heavy rain and hail that are likely to hit the area.

Other parts of the country will be hit by strong winds.

MetService has warned people in the Canterbury Plains and North Otago to be prepared for flash floods around low-lying areas such as rivers, streams or narrow valleys, which can cause slipping. Rainfall is expected to be more than 25mm in some areas.

A front moved eastward across the South Island overnight.

This means that heavy rain can occur with thunderstorms in the Westland region south of Otira, and in Dunedin and North Otago.

Driving conditions will also be dangerous, with surface flooding and poor visibility during heavy rain.

Heavy hail can cause significant damage to crops, orchards, vines, greenhouses and vehicles.

Northwest winds can reach heavy storms from inland Canterbury to Marlborough, Wellington and Wairarapa.

Meanwhile, a storm likely to bring destructive winds and heavy waves centered on New Zealand’s West Coast, prompting warnings for those camping, on foot or on the water.

Weatherwatch.co.nz estimates strong winds “damaging” more than 150 km / h, waves of up to 13 meters, and one meter of snow in the Southern Alps.

There may also be over 200 mm of rain for parts of the West Coast.

Police say they have not issued a specific warning for the storm, but they always urge motorists to drive according to the conditions.

“In wet and windy weather that means slowing down and increasing the distance to follow,” said a spokesman.

Philip Duncan at weatherwatch.co.nz said the storm would be significant.

Weather and wind action today.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind action today. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

“The stormy Southern Ocean weather pattern is temporarily putting the La Nina pattern to one side with two significant lows – one today and the other around Tuesday, Wednesday.

“Sunday’s low, which still hasn’t suppressed some thunderstorms, rain and winds for parts of New Zealand, will actually be tracing out of the country today. So we don’t expect anything too serious today, although it remains up-to-date with possible MetService severe warning no matter where you are. “

Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

But the ensuing storm worries Duncan, especially for those venturing outdoors.

“The Tuesday / Wednesday event appears to be the most intense with the epicenter of this hurricane potentially crossing Southland and Otago.”

As a hurricane hits the country with its strong northwest strong winds, it will then be followed by a cool southern turn with heavy rains that will hit the West Coast.

Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Auckland is expected to cool down but will not experience as violent a storm as the South Island one.

MetService meteorologist Peter Little said southwestern changes that begin on Wednesday through Thursday will bring temperatures down to 10C on the South Island.

Dunedin will drop from 25C today to 15C.

Few say that temperature changes won’t be as dramatic as on the North Island, but people will definitely feel the impact from the southwest.

Auckland will drop from 27C today to 21C on Wednesday, and 20C on Thursday.

Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Until then, the hot weather will continue. Whangārei and Gisborne can expect temperatures of 30C, Auckland and Tauranga 27C and Hamilton 26C.

In today’s South Island, Kaikoura is a hot spot of 28C. Christchurch and Ashburton are set at 27C.

The front exerts its energies on the South Island, and central New Zealand – Wellington, Wairarapa – is bearing the brunt of strong winds. Bad weather warning has been issued.

-RNZ additional reporting

Wind gusts speed early Monday.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Wind gusts speed early Monday. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

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Urgent attention as ‘destructive’ storm will hit NZ; West Coast in the firing line | Instant News


Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

A storm that is likely to bring destructive winds and swells is centered on New Zealand’s West Coast, prompting warnings for those camping, on foot or on the water.

Weatherwatch.co.nz estimates strong winds “damaging” more than 150 km / h, waves of up to 13 meters, and one meter of snow in the Southern Alps.

There may also be over 200 mm of rain for parts of the West Coast.

Police say they have not issued a specific warning for the storm, but they always urge motorists to drive according to the conditions.

“In wet and windy weather that means slowing down and increasing the distance to follow,” said a spokesman.

Philip Duncan at weatherwatch.co.nz said the storm would be significant.

Weather and wind action today.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind action today. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

“The stormy Southern Ocean weather pattern is temporarily putting the La Nina pattern to one side with two significant lows – one today and the other around Tuesday, Wednesday.

“Sunday’s low, which still hasn’t suppressed some thunderstorms, rain and winds for parts of New Zealand, will actually be tracing out of the country today. So we don’t expect anything too serious today, although it remains up-to-date with possible MetService severe warning no matter where you are. “

Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

But the ensuing storm worries Duncan, especially for those venturing outdoors.

“The Tuesday / Wednesday event appears to be the most intense with the epicenter of this hurricane potentially crossing Southland and Otago.”

As a hurricane hits the country with its strong northwest strong winds, it will then be followed by a cool southern turn with heavy rains that will hit the West Coast.

Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Auckland is expected to cool down but will not experience as violent a storm as the South Island one.

MetService meteorologist Peter Little said southwestern changes that begin on Wednesday through Thursday will bring temperatures down to 10C on the South Island.

Dunedin will drop from 25C today to 15C.

Few say that temperature changes won’t be as dramatic as on the North Island, but people will definitely feel the impact from the southwest.

Auckland will drop from 27C today to 21C on Wednesday, and 20C on Thursday.

Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Until then, the hot weather will continue. Whangārei and Gisborne can expect temperatures of 30C, Auckland and Tauranga 27C and Hamilton 26C.

In today’s South Island, Kaikoura is a hot spot of 28C. Christchurch and Ashburton are set at 27C.

The front exerts its energies on the South Island, and central New Zealand – Wellington, Wairarapa – is bearing the brunt of strong winds. Bad weather warning has been issued.

Meanwhile, warnings were in place tonight for the Canterbury Plains and North Otago, where it is expected to see more than 25 mm of rain, along with hail.

MetService has warned people to be prepared for flash floods around low-lying areas such as rivers, streams or narrow valleys, which can cause slipping.

Driving conditions will also be dangerous, with surface flooding and poor visibility during heavy rain.

Heavy hail can cause significant damage to crops, orchards, vines, greenhouses and vehicles.

-RNZ additional reporting

Wind gusts speed early Monday.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Wind gusts speed early Monday. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

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NZ regulators issue a Bitcoin warning: Be prepared to lose all your money | Instant News


Business

Liam Dann sits drinking beer with finance minister Steven Joyce to talk about Bitcoin and the economy.

The Financial Markets Authority has issued an emphatically-spoken warning for the Kiwi to consider taking over cryptocurrency.

The watchdog provided his comments to the Herald following Bitcoin’s latest rollercoaster move – the digital currency’s value has fallen by about a third since Friday after doubling over the past month – and similar advice issued by its UK counterpart, the Financial Conduct Authority or FCA.

“New Zealanders considering buying cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, should be aware that this is a high-risk and highly volatile asset,” said an FMA spokesman.

“Cryptocurrency is not regulated in New Zealand and is often exploited by scammers and hackers.

“FMA shares FCA’s concern that some crypto exchanges promise high returns and customers must be prepared to lose all their money.

“Many foreign cryptocurrency exchanges are not regulated and operate exclusively online – without a connection to New Zealand. This makes it difficult to know who is offering, exchanging, buying or selling cryptocurrency”

If you are planning to buy cryptocurrency, you should at least ensure that the exchange is listed on the List of Financial Service Providers (FSPR), which gives you access to dispute resolution schemes, said an FMA spokesman.

“You should also check if the exchange keeps your New Zealand dollars in a trust account.”

While much of the narrative around Bitcoin has focused on the rollercoaster valuation of cryptocurrency, people buying any digital currency need to be aware of practical issues too, such as how easy it is to convert to fiat currency.

The $ 30 million Cryptopia theft, which involved a Christchurch-based cryptocurrency exchange operating globally, also highlighted that crypto deposits are not guaranteed – unlike most traditional currencies, where governments would normally step in either by law or political pressure if there was a big loss.

The liquidator from Grant Thornton, and the police, is still around try to parse what happened to the Cryptopia hack, which happened in January 2019.

3 things you need to know about cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin

• They are high risk and very volatile – prices can go up and down very quickly
• They are not regulated in New Zealand
Cryptocurrencies, crypto-exchanges, and the people who use them are often targets for hacks, online scams and scams

Source / FMA

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The Dunedin woman lost $ 15,000 on a phone scam | Instant News


The 69-year-old woman was told that her Spark account had been hacked by a fake employee. Photo / Getty Images

One woman was scammed $ 15,000 by a telephone fraudster, triggering a stern warning to alert the public.

Sgt. Gemma McKenzie, from Dunedin, said the 69-year-old Dunedin woman was called on Friday night by someone claiming to be a Spark employee and told that her account was being hacked.

Personal information is obtained by callers.

When the woman checked her bank account afterward, she saw that $ 15,000 had been withdrawn without her consent.

Netsafe chief executive Martin Cocker said thousands of fraudulent calls were made and emails were sent across New Zealand every week.

“Unfortunately, this is very common.”

Educating people is important, as are the technological solutions used by banks to prevent con artists from accessing money.

It will be difficult for police to catch con artists, as many are based outside the country.

There is lots of advice on the Netsafe website to help people stop themselves falling prey to scammers, he said.

A police spokesman said multiple phone scams can occur nationwide at any one time and while some details vary, the general premise is the same.

Often times, callers will suggest the person’s account has been hacked or that their internet will be cut, and ask for personal information to fix the problem.

People shouldn’t automatically trust someone over the phone or online they have never met. They should ask for credentials if someone says they’re from the business, and if the call looks suspicious, they should hang up immediately.

“Safeguard your personal details the same way you would your wallet and other possessions.

“And remember, if something looks or sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

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America’s Cup graphic: Sir Russell Coutts and Sir Ian Taylor of Animation Research in a copyright dispute | Instant News


Graphics used by Sir Ian Taylor Animation Research’s company during a pre-Christmas racing broadcast.

Sir Russell Coutts’ sailing interests have warned that if the graphics used by Sir Ian Taylor’s Animation Research for the pre-Christmas races were used in broadcasting the 36th America’s Cup, the High Court alleges copyright infringement would be filed.

The warning shots fired by two companies led by Coutts – Oracle Racing and F50 League LLC traded as SailGP – had consequences for how the upcoming Prada Cup and America’s Cup were broadcast.

A legal notice alleging copyright infringement during a pre-Christmas race over the graphics used in what is known as the LiveLine system of the augmented reality broadcast was sent to Animation Research Limited (ARL) and two other parties on December 23.

Taylor – most recently knighted for his work including pioneering the development of the world’s leading real-time 3D visualization for major sports broadcasts starting with Virtual Eyes for the America’s Cup – said he was “deeply disappointed” that his New Zealand counterparts served his company in a way violates copyright notices that could “seriously impact coverage of the upcoming Prada Cup and the Copa America itself”.

Sir Russell Coutts.
Sir Russell Coutts.

In response to the Herald’s question, Sir Russell Coutts said, “We are only trying to protect IP [intellectual property] which we’ve invested millions of dollars in developing over the last decade.

“We prefer not to be forced to protect our rights through legal process, but like all copyrighted material, it must be licensed for use by commercial entities.

“We have asked that the current Copa America organizers avoid breaches by revising their charts, or paying a license fee accordingly.”

Taylor claims the two Coutts-led companies claim copyrights based on the ARL image created in 1992 and which has been used at every Copa America since then – including in 1995 when Coutts famously created the “Cup of America, Cup of New Zealand”.

“We have submitted the chart for events where he also raced against New Zealand, starting with him winning the Cup from New Zealand with Alinghi (Switzerland) in 2003 and then winning it from Alinghi for BMW Oracle (USA) in 2010,” said Taylor.

Oracle Racing and SailGP believe that the intellectual property associated with Animation Research’s graphics has been transferred to event organizers at previous America’s Cup regattas.

Oracle Racing and SailGP are at the center of rival high-tech screen series, spearheaded by billionaire Oracle founder Larry Ellison and Coutts, the most successful helmsman in America’s Cup history.

Their goal is to use the LiveLine graphics – whose copyright they claim – during the series.

Sir Ian Taylor, founder of Animation Research.  Photo / Provided
Sir Ian Taylor, founder of Animation Research. Photo / Provided

Taylor confirmed to the Herald that he wrote to Coutts on December 7 last year detailing Animation Research technology that had been contracted to provide broadcasting of the 36th America’s Cup.

Taylor said he approached Coutts late last year offering to share the new technology ARL had developed. He said he didn’t hear back until shortly before the first pre-Christmas regatta began, during which Coutts advised he had some concerns about ARL’s plans, but didn’t share what those concerns were.

“Next we heard from him was an official letter arriving on December 23, just as we closed for Christmas, with a January 5 deadline for our response. It would be fair to say that made our plans a bit of a mess.”

Earlier, the record contender began talks with Coutts, asking about securing a license to use the LiveLine system in an upcoming American Cup series.

It was finally rejected by the challenger.

The Coutts-led company said that if Animation Research wants to continue using what it claims is a copied image, they are willing to discuss the appropriate license terms.

Taylor admits the LiveLine chart is a significant step forward.

Taylor claims what Coutts creates is based entirely on the universally acclaimed 3D ARL Virtual Eye graphic display as ultimately making sense for cruising.

“We were really surprised because it was one step forward in telling the story of the Copa America.”

Taylor said for the 36th America’s Cup, ARL is adapting its own package of augmented reality graphics that it uses in other sports, including golf and cricket, to bring the technology to screen as well.

“Technology has advanced significantly since 2017 in Bermuda.”

Taylor said the outcome of the action under threat was that ARL would now put forward the ideas they plan to launch around the Copa America defense and apply them to the Prada Cup, which takes place this weekend in Auckland.

“That means having to bring some of the team off their vacation but there is no way we want this Kiwi show in Waitematā to be compromised in any way,” said Taylor.

“My real hope is that we can forget about this and do something together that will benefit this sport that Russell has contributed so much to.”

Taylor and two others sent a lengthy response to Oracle Racing and SailGP on Friday evening after the original January 5 deadline was extended, but at this stage the matter has not been resolved.

What the Sir Russell Coutts company claims
LiveLine is an augmented reality system in the scope of racing, which involves the use of a field graphic overlaid on live footage of racing action on water, complemented by real-time data obtained from multiple sources including onboard sensors.
The system is protected by a US patent and the company led by Coutts has claimed copyright on a related graphics package that has the key elements: Off-track borders; ability to display written material within borders; a ladder or frame and a number placed under the parallel line to reflect the boat’s direction and distance to the next mark.

Sir Ian Taylor’s response
The company led by Coutts claims copyright to the three elements we use in our Virtual Eye graphics pack.
The first is a closed border, basically a playing field governed by the rules, the second is a grid of parallel lines showing where the boats are connected to each other and the buoy markers, and finally the sponsor’s name is lying on the water.

Sir Ian Taylor says the concept that Sir Russell Coutts claims to copyright claims is a concept that Animation Research shared with him in March 2010. Image / Supplied
Sir Ian Taylor says the concept that Sir Russell Coutts claims to copyright claims is a concept that Animation Research shared with him in March 2010. Image / Supplied

We’ve been doing most of this since 1992 and have done it at every Copa America since then.
Due to this threat we had to take our staff on a day off to implement a new package to be used for the Games. [the America’s Cup defence], but now we will introduce it for the Prada Cup so that the fans are not harmed by this action.

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