Tag Archives: waves

Why French-inspired Akaroa is one of New Zealand’s most unique places | Instant News


Aerial view of the Akaroa waterfront, New Zealand. Photo / 123rf

At the pier at Akaroa Harbor, waves slamming lazily on the pile. Today’s harbor is milky white, the mud from the Rakaia and Rangitata rivers hanging in the water, having completed its long journey from the Southern Alps and across the Canterbury Plains. It turned out that the water turned powder blue from a distance, but from where we sat, it was icy cold and clear.

Just back from the water, diners sit under sunscreen on wicker chairs outside the Bully Hayes bar, and watch yachts and schooners bobbing on the sparkling water just steps away. A gull full of hope hovered overhead, watching the chip situation. From our point of view, cold beer in hand, this could be France on a sunny summer day – if it weren’t for the sound of Fat Freddy’s Drop bringing a breeze. And the fact in New Zealand that we are sitting in the caldera of an ancient, flooded volcano.

Akaroa has so many stories, and so much history, to unravel. Made by volcanoes, inhabited by Māori, founded by the French, claimed by the British.

It’s a French heritage largely traded in the city, but the city’s authenticity, albeit based on fact and history, comes with a hint of flicker – a medieval marketing tool for luring tourists to the city.

Old Akaroa lighthouse, Banks Peninsula.  Photo / 123rf
Old Akaroa lighthouse, Banks Peninsula. Photo / 123rf

It is true that this is Canterbury’s oldest city, and indeed it was founded by about 60 French settlers who arrived in 1840. But the French colonizers never got the right footing (the British quickly declared sovereignty over all of New Zealand to cut France off) and at The 1950s there is only one surviving example of French architecture in Akaroa – the courthouse, which is now part of the Akaroa Museum.

In the 1960s, French suddenly made a comeback – the city’s oldest streets with French origins were renamed “rue” and the modern identity of Akaroa began.

It is a very picturesque place, in a sheltered harbor surrounded by historic buildings and beautifully manicured gardens. It’s fun to walk along the “street”, to eat Toulouse sausages from a local butcher, or see posters for the annual “French festival”. To feel like you are in a place slightly different from other parts of New Zealand.

If you want to understand Akaroa’s history and heritage, a stop at the museum is a must. This is where we learn that Captain Jean-Francois de Surville was sailing these waters at the same time as Cook on the Endeavor, in the late 1760s. (Even though Cook named the area Banks Peninsula, he actually mistook it for an island). The French established themselves in the area, naming the bay of Port Louis-Philippe, creating a whaling and naval station, a doctor’s office, and a built road. For a time, French culture and language dominated.

The descendants of those 60 French settlers remain, and indeed lately, a French accent is heard, a more recent import from Europe. On the burial slopes of French L’Aube Hill, the names Pierre, Libeau and and Fleuri attest to the authenticity of the relationship.

Akaroa in the afternoon sun.  Photo / CCC
Akaroa in the afternoon sun. Photo / CCC

How to see Hector’s famous dolphin

The French may have lured us to the city, but it’s another famous resident we’d love to see today – Hector’s dolphin, one of the smallest dolphins in the world. Their number is disputed, but there is generally an agreement between 9,000 and 15,000 in the world. Here on the Banks Peninsula, about 1500 reside.

We went with Coast Up Close, a small business run by skipper and owner Tony, who has been taking tourists out on Wairiri – a fishing boat built in Invercargill – for 10 years. It’s the perfect day for that, with clear skies and clear water.

In fact dolphins prefer small shelters. Because sharks don’t use echo locations, they prefer to hunt when the water is clear. Dolphins like a little mud for camouflage. Even so, they didn’t keep their distance. As we emerged from the harbor, our first sighting occurred within minutes. In between the sightings, Tony commented on the port, geology and history of Akaroa.

Judging from the water, Akaroa’s natural setting is clearer. We sailed across a volcanic crater, been extinct for about 6 million years, and now inundated by the sea. This massive cone, which forms the backdrop of the Akaroa mountains, has been eroded to only two-thirds its size.

As we sailed further afield, we saw Ōnuku Marae from Ngai Tahu, and a pretty little church nearby, built in 1871, one of the oldest non-denominational churches in New Zealand. Between dolphins, we saw red-billed gulls and white pigeons circling, taking advantage of the hunting of kahawai under the waves, pushing bait fish to the surface.

Hector's Jumping Dolphins at Akaroa Harbor.  Photo / Tony Muir
Hector’s Jumping Dolphins at Akaroa Harbor. Photo / Tony Muir

The benefits of a small boat aren’t just the comments and personal service you get from the captain. It’s also maneuverable, getting you straight to the shoreline and around (and sometimes through) rock. They do things a little differently on this ship. If the dolphins show up, that’s fine, but if they don’t, it’s up to them – captain Tony won’t chase them. He has been known to jump from the side when he wants a little fishing. On our return trip, a free diver approached his kayak to chat, and showed him the catch of the day – quinine and cray. He’s 75 years old. The young backpackers on the ship were flabbergasted.

But dolphins are stars and whenever they appear the deck is filled with oohs and aahs. They easily approached, surfed in the pressure waves that the hulls created beneath the surface, ducked and dived in front of us.

Back ashore at Akaroa

Back on land, like Mad Dogs and Englishmen, we took a walk in the midday sun. The small town is divided in two by a promenade, where locals and visitors stroll among the shops and cafes. But summer days can get very hot here. As in Europe, on hot days the locals retreated inside, or into the beautiful flower-filled gardens lining the streets, the roses falling on the wooden fences.

We walked to the ocean end of the Rue Balguerie, and watched the kids bomb from the pier, then came back and found ourselves at Harbar, a small restaurant and beach bar situated directly on the water, overlooking the French Bay. We settle for cold beer, gin-soaked mussels and fries, and watch the boat toss around. It may be summer on the Riviera, but here, a unique slice of Aotearoa.

Get out at the harbor and see the dolphins

Hectors dolphins are a must. Coast Up Close takes you out on their little kauri launch, allowing you to get up close and personal with the incredible dolphins, seals, sea caves and cliffs of the Banks Peninsula. The 2.5 hour cruise leaves twice a day. coastupclose.co.nz

Go sea kayaking with penguins

Across the Banks Peninsula, you’ll find the Pōhatu Marine Reserve, which is home to the largest Little Penguin colony on mainland New Zealand. Day trips on the Pohatu Penguins will pick you up from Akaroa, take you on a scenic tour with stops, across the peninsula, then sends you out into the water to see penguins as well as seals, seabirds and other wildlife. pohatu.co.nz

Walk the Banks Track

This three day and three night hike is a hidden gem. New Zealand’s oldest private walk offers stunning views through farms and forests, charming accommodation – and some well-worth the hike. It’s just enough challenge to make you feel good enough about yourself. Along the way, you’ll find up-close wildlife, unique huts, and the picturesque Hinewai Nature Reserve, an ecological restoration project. It is self-catering, but package carts are included. For an extra $ 50, you can have a chilled cabin that is driven into the cottage, so you don’t have to skimp on wine, cheese, and sausages. bankstrack.co.nz

A hiker along the Banks Track.  Photo / Alister Winter
A hiker along the Banks Track. Photo / Alister Winter

Visit the Giant’s House

The Giant’s House is a sculpture garden created by artist Josie Martin. This is an eccentric Gaudi-esque mosaic display, including sculptures of animals, people, flowers and chairs. You can walk there from town – walk straight down Rue Balguerie from Beach Rd. thegiantshouse.co.nz

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newfinder.co.nz and newzealand.com

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Urgent attention as ‘destructive’ storm will hit NZ; West Coast in the firing line | Instant News


Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

A storm that is likely to bring destructive winds and swells is centered on New Zealand’s West Coast, prompting warnings for those camping, on foot or on the water.

Weatherwatch.co.nz estimates strong winds “damaging” more than 150 km / h, waves of up to 13 meters, and one meter of snow in the Southern Alps.

There may also be over 200 mm of rain for parts of the West Coast.

Police say they have not issued a specific warning for the storm, but they always urge motorists to drive according to the conditions.

“In wet and windy weather that means slowing down and increasing the distance to follow,” said a spokesman.

Philip Duncan at weatherwatch.co.nz said the storm would be significant.

Weather and wind action today.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind action today. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

“The stormy Southern Ocean weather pattern is temporarily putting the La Nina pattern to one side with two significant lows – one today and the other around Tuesday, Wednesday.

“Sunday’s low, which still hasn’t suppressed some thunderstorms, rain and winds for parts of New Zealand, will actually be tracing out of the country today. So we don’t expect anything too serious today, although it remains up-to-date with possible MetService severe warning no matter where you are. “

Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

But the ensuing storm worries Duncan, especially for those venturing outdoors.

“The Tuesday / Wednesday event appears to be the most intense with the epicenter of this hurricane potentially crossing Southland and Otago.”

As a hurricane hits the country with its strong northwest strong winds, it will then be followed by a cool southern turn with heavy rains that will hit the West Coast.

Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Auckland is expected to cool down but will not experience as violent a storm as the South Island one.

MetService meteorologist Peter Little said southwestern changes that begin on Wednesday through Thursday will bring temperatures down to 10C on the South Island.

Dunedin will drop from 25C today to 15C.

Few say that temperature changes won’t be as dramatic as on the North Island, but people will definitely feel the impact from the southwest.

Auckland will drop from 27C today to 21C on Wednesday, and 20C on Thursday.

Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Until then, the hot weather will continue. Whangārei and Gisborne can expect temperatures of 30C, Auckland and Tauranga 27C and Hamilton 26C.

In today’s South Island, Kaikoura is a hot spot of 28C. Christchurch and Ashburton are set at 27C.

The front exerts its energies on the South Island, and central New Zealand – Wellington, Wairarapa – is bearing the brunt of strong winds. Bad weather warning has been issued.

Meanwhile, warnings were in place tonight for the Canterbury Plains and North Otago, where it is expected to see more than 25 mm of rain, along with hail.

MetService has warned people to be prepared for flash floods around low-lying areas such as rivers, streams or narrow valleys, which can cause slipping.

Driving conditions will also be dangerous, with surface flooding and poor visibility during heavy rain.

Heavy hail can cause significant damage to crops, orchards, vines, greenhouses and vehicles.

-RNZ additional reporting

Wind gusts speed early Monday.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Wind gusts speed early Monday. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

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Simplifying Lockups Making Daily Choices More Complicated – NBC New York | Instant News


Many things become clearer when almost everything is locked.

Now, with countries lifting restrictions on their coronavirus little by little and according to their own schedule, often arbitrary, Americans face many confused decisions about what they should and shouldn’t do to protect their health, their livelihoods and neighbors they.

Is it safe now to join the crowd at the beach or eat at a restaurant? To visit elderly parents that you haven’t seen in nearly two months? To reopen a business that is struggling?

In many cases, unsatisfactory answers from experts are: Dependent.

“There will never be a perfect amount of protection,” said Josh Santarpia, a microbiologist at the University of Nebraska Medical Center who studies coronavirus. “This is a personal risk assessment. Everyone has to decide, person by person, what risks they want to tolerate. “

Jill Faust, 53, from Council Bluffs, Iowa, said he would hesitate to eat at an indoor restaurant when such a business was allowed to reopen in his community on Friday.

“We have to know in advance what precautions they are taking,” he said, citing the way some restaurants rely on limited seating, tables with a good distance, masks for employees and disposable glasses and plates. Even then, he said, it might not be worth the problem.

“Going to a restaurant for me is a beautiful and relaxing experience where you can sit with people and relax after a long day. If your experience will be limited by all these security issues, why spend money?” she says.

Such decisions will become far more frequent in the coming weeks as officials in Europe and the US move to reopen schools and businesses.

With the crisis easing in many places, France, Spain and Greece were among the latest countries Tuesday to announce a road map to restart their economy. In California, Governor Gavin Newsom said school children could be allowed to return to classrooms in early July, even though an official decision had not been made.

When restrictions are relaxed, health authorities will be closely watching for signs of a virus awakening.

On Tuesday, for example, Germany reported an increase in infection rates since several small businesses were allowed to reopen more than a week ago. But it is too soon to say whether easing is to blame.

Worldwide, confirmed infections reach more than 3 million – including 1 million in the US – and the number of confirmed global deaths reaches 210,000, according to Johns Hopkins University. The actual toll is believed to be much higher due to limited testing, differences in counting the dead and hiding the government.

In the U.S., uncertainty ahead was in the spotlight in Georgia after businesses such as barber shops and tattoo parlors were given the green light to reopen.

Mayor Savannah Van Johnson said people could find the change confusing.

“In fact we are under orders to stay home until April 30,” Johnson said. “But you can finish your nails, you can get a tattoo, you can go to the movies, you can go to the bowling alley. Things like that make people confused. “

The decisions that people make tend to vary greatly depending on where they live, and how close they are to a known group of viruses. In Georgia, where COVID-19 has killed at least 1,000, many new cases are still being reported.

But even in places with lesser known infections, people face difficult choices.

In Omaha, Nebraska, where businesses can reopen next week, teachers Michelle and Mark Aschenbrenner say they want to return to the restaurant they visit often. Mark Aschenbrenner has made an appointment for a long-delayed haircut.

“I think we are four weeks too early,” he said of plans to lift restrictions. But “I thought I might go anyway because we had been stuck at home for seven weeks and we were going crazy.”

With warmer weather attracting more people to explore in the next few weeks, it depends on individuals to be careful.

“You cannot swear that if someone coughs on a beach chair on your left and then you get a gentle breeze that hits you, that you don’t have that kind of exposure,” Dr. Marybeth Sexton, an infectious disease specialist at Emory University School of Medicine.

Even following guidelines for keeping a distance of 6 feet may not be enough. The rule is based on how far the coronavirus, SARS, is spread among aircraft passengers.

When doctors treated more than a dozen COVID-19 patients at the Omaha hospital, researchers found genetic material from the virus at greater distances – on the edges of windows, cellphones, in the aisles and on toilet seats, Santarpia said.

That doesn’t mean people can’t leave. But they must be very careful in doing so, limiting visits with relatives and friends for important moments, said Dr. Emily Landon, who leads infection control at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

Mother’s Day – May 10 in the United States – may qualify if you live nearby, he said. But limit the number of people involved and wear masks all the time. Even if you check to make sure everyone present feels good, accept that there will be risks, he said.

In Germany, where lockouts were reduced earlier this month, the number of people infected by each operator has increased from around 0.7 to 0.96 still managed, said Lothar Wieler, head of the Robert Koch Institute. He urged people to keep abiding by distancing social rules, including wearing a mask when on public transportation or shopping.

Elsewhere around the world, New Zealand reported only three new infections Tuesday, and the government loosened the key. Surfers hit the waves at dawn, builders returned to the construction site and the barista started the espresso machine.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said people had done extraordinary work in breaking the chain of transmission but warned they must remain vigilant.

“Maybe there is still burning ash out there, and they have the potential to become a fire again, if we give them a chance,” he said, quoting a microbiologist.

In Australia, hundreds of people returned to waters after Sydney’s Bondi Beach reopened for swimmers and surfers. However, people can use the beach only during the day and must keep their distance from each other. Australia has recorded 83 deaths from the virus, fewer than reported by most U.S. states.

But this virus is still a long-term enemy. The president of the Japan Medical Association, Yoshitake Yokokura, said he thought it would be difficult to hold the Tokyo Summer Olympics which was rescheduled even in 2021 without an effective vaccine.

In a shorter period of time, it depends on individuals and also policy makers to make decisions that will help map the course of the virus.

“I think everyone still needs to use their judgment. I don’t have a book club in my house. “I’m going to see a doctor for an allergy injection because it’s safe to do,” said Landon, a Chicago infection control expert. “You can try and make it political, make it about freedom, but it’s a virus. This is biology. Biology does not negotiate. “

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This story has been corrected to show that Jill Faust’s hometown is Council Bluffs, Iowa.

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AP Haven Daley video reporter in San Francisco contributed.

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Follow the AP pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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New Zealand Taming the Virus as France, Spain Reveal Lockout Out – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth | Instant News


France and Spain, the two countries hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic, compiled separate roadmaps on Tuesday for lifting their locks, while signs emerged that the virus had been defeated in New Zealand and Australia.

But on the other side of the world, Brazil is emerging as a new hotspot for infection. And new doubts arise about whether Japan will be able to host the Summer Olympics which has been postponed next year without developing vaccines.

The key question is when to reopen soaring schools around the world when countries try to restart their devastated economy.

Although coronavirus seems to affect children far more seriously than adults, many officials, teachers and parents are worried about the health risks that can be posed by opening schools. Some pointed out the difficulty in ensuring that children remained at social distance and washed their hands frequently, and health risks for teachers.

The corona virus pandemic is taking more and more casualties on the nation’s meat suppliers. Last week the biggest Tyson pork factory announced a temporary halt to operations after nearly 200 workers there fell ill. Tyson said millions of pounds of meat would disappear from store shelves until the plants could be reopened safely.

But many parents will struggle to return to work without an open school, hampering efforts to fight the deep economic downturn in the world.

In France, President Emmanuel Macron wants schools to reopen on May 11, but teachers, parents and some mayors raise alarms. The government says parents can decide whether to send their children back to class and will release more details Tuesday night.

Joel Wilmotte is among a growing number of French mayors who refuse to reopen their schools, at least for now.

“I am not against reopening schools,” he said on the northern Hautmont city Facebook page.

Pug Carlina Utara named Winston has tested positive for corona virus along with three human members from her family after a study at Duke University.

But he listed seven reasons why he was not prepared to do so, including incomplete teachers and cleaning staff and a poll showing that most French parents opposed the reopening of schools. So he closed six schools in his city “until further notice.”

Greece, which has managed to keep its coronavirus mortality rate low at 136 people, also released more details on Tuesday about reducing its locking but schools remain a complicated topic.

Schools will be reopened “gradually, with conditions” and will be reviewed continuously, said a spokesman for the Ministry of Health coronavirus, specialist in infectious disease Sotiris Tsiodras. No opening date has been set yet.

Scientists agree children are less at risk of contracting the virus and seem to transmit it less than adults, said Tsiodras.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added six new symptoms – including chills, muscle aches, headaches, and loss of taste or odor – to the symptoms of the new corona virus. Lucy Bustamante of NBC10 reports why this new symptom can get more people tested for COVID-19.

The devastated Italy, however, kept schools closed until September. That is what makes parents in a difficult position to return to work without access to their child’s caregivers: grandparents, who are now considered forbidden because they are the most vulnerable to viruses.

Emer McCarthy, who works in the Vatican’s child protection office, tweeted that Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte had discussed locking out “for everyone except for Italian children. Incredible. There was no mention of schools, childcare options, no. But football is yes. #ChildrenNotSeenNotHeard. “

In China, where the pandemic began, schools began to open on Monday, but only for seniors at the middle and middle school level who were preparing for exams. The class size is cut no more than 30.

The number of new cases every day in China has fallen to a single figure, but the authorities remain wary of the possibility of a second wave of infection.

In the United States, which has the highest mortality rate in the world of more than 56,000, President Donald Trump said countries must “seriously consider” reopening their public schools before the end of the academic year, despite dozens already said it’s not safe for students to return until summer or fall.

“Some of you might start thinking about opening a school, because many people want to have a school opening,” Trump said. “Young people have done very well in this disaster.”

Trump also acknowledged the number of virus deaths could reach 70,000 in the US, after citing 60,000 in recent months.

The number of confirmed infections worldwide has risen to more than 3 million and the number of confirmed deaths has reached 211,000, according to the calculation by Johns Hopkins University. The actual number of pandemics is likely to be much higher because of limited testing, minor cases that are missed, deficiencies in counting the dead and a government that might try to hide the extent of its spread.

Italy, Spain, France and the UK each contributed more than 21,000 virus-related deaths.

In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro insisted that COVID-19 was only a “small flu” and said there was no need for a type of restriction that slowed the spread of infection elsewhere.

Brazil, the most populous country in Latin America with 211 million people, has reported 4,600 deaths and 67,000 confirmed infections. But the true number is believed to be much higher given the lack of tests and many people who have not sought hospital treatment.

Medical officials in Rio de Janeiro and at least four other major Brazilian cities have been warned But their hospital system is on the verge of collapse or too overwhelmed to take more patients. There are also signs that more and more Brazilian victims have died at home.

The federal government is urging that some countries begin to loosen COVID-19 restrictions. Many don’t seem to follow the guidelines issued by the White House. Member of the Coronavirus Task Force Dr. Deborah Birx said the state needed to find a county-by-county to determine whether it was safe to reopen or not.

“We have all the conditions here for a pandemic to be far more serious,” said Paulo Brandão, a virus expert at the University of Sao Paulo.

Bolsonaro said Brazilians need to continue their lives to prevent an economic crisis, but most state governors have implemented restrictions to keep people home and slow the spread of the virus.

New Zealand, on the other hand, reported only three new infections Tuesday. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said people had done extraordinary work in breaking the chain of transmission of the virus, but warned they needed to remain vigilant.

“Maybe there is still burning ash out there, and they have the potential to become a fire again, if we give them a chance,” he said, quoting a microbiologist.

The government is loosening its key, which has closed schools and most businesses. Surfers hit the waves at dawn on Tuesday, the builder returned to the construction site and the barista started the espresso machine.

In Australia, hundreds of people returned to the waters after Sydney’s iconic Bondi Beach reopened for swimmers and surfers. However, people can only use the beach during the day, cannot linger and are limited to ensure social distance. Australia has reported only 83 deaths from the virus, less than the number of victims reported by more than 25 U.S. states.

But this virus is still a long-term enemy. The president of the Japanese Medical Association, Yoshitake Yokokura, said he thought that would happen it is difficult to hold the Tokyo Summer Olympics which are rescheduled even in 2021 without an effective coronavirus vaccine.

Japan and the International Olympic Committee agreed to postpone the Tokyo 2020 Olympics until July 2021 because of a pandemic. Japan has been in a state of emergency for a month amid increasing infections and medical workers say hospitals are too burdened.


Becatoros reports from Athens, Greece and Perry from Wellington, New Zealand. Associated Press reporters around the world contributed to this report.

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New Zealand Taming the Virus as France, Spain Reveal Lockout Out – NBC Connecticut | Instant News


France and Spain, the two countries hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic, compiled separate roadmaps on Tuesday for lifting their locks, while signs emerged that the virus had been defeated in New Zealand and Australia.

But on the other side of the world, Brazil is emerging as a new hotspot for infection. And new doubts arise about whether Japan will be able to host the Summer Olympics which has been postponed next year without developing vaccines.

The key question is when to reopen soaring schools around the world when countries try to restart their devastated economy.

Although coronavirus seems to affect children far more seriously than adults, many officials, teachers and parents are worried about the health risks that can be posed by opening schools. Some pointed out the difficulty in ensuring that children remained at social distance and washed their hands frequently, and health risks for teachers.

The corona virus pandemic is taking more and more casualties on the nation’s meat suppliers. Last week the biggest Tyson pork factory announced a temporary halt to operations after nearly 200 workers there fell ill. Tyson said millions of pounds of meat would disappear from store shelves until the plants could be reopened safely.

But many parents will struggle to return to work without an open school, hampering efforts to fight the deep economic downturn in the world.

In France, President Emmanuel Macron wants schools to reopen on May 11, but teachers, parents and some mayors raise alarms. The government says parents can decide whether to send their children back to class and will release more details Tuesday night.

Joel Wilmotte is among a growing number of French mayors who refuse to reopen their schools, at least for now.

“I am not against reopening schools,” he said on the northern Hautmont city Facebook page.

Pug Carlina Utara named Winston has tested positive for corona virus along with three human members from her family after a study at Duke University.

But he listed seven reasons why he was not prepared to do so, including incomplete teachers and cleaning staff and a poll showing that most French parents opposed the reopening of schools. So he closed six schools in his city “until further notice.”

Greece, which has managed to keep its coronavirus mortality rate low at 136 people, also released more details on Tuesday about reducing its locking but schools remain a complicated topic.

Schools will be reopened “gradually, with conditions” and will be reviewed continuously, said a spokesman for the Ministry of Health coronavirus, specialist in infectious disease Sotiris Tsiodras. No opening date has been set yet.

Scientists agree children are less at risk of contracting the virus and seem to transmit it less than adults, said Tsiodras.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added six new symptoms – including chills, muscle aches, headaches, and loss of taste or odor – to the symptoms of the new corona virus. Lucy Bustamante of NBC10 reports why this new symptom can get more people tested for COVID-19.

The devastated Italy, however, kept schools closed until September. That is what makes parents in a difficult position to return to work without access to their child’s caregivers: grandparents, who are now considered forbidden because they are the most vulnerable to viruses.

Emer McCarthy, who works in the Vatican’s child protection office, tweeted that Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte had discussed locking out “for everyone except for Italian children. Incredible. There was no mention of schools, childcare options, no. But football is yes. #ChildrenNotSeenNotHeard. “

In China, where the pandemic began, schools began to open on Monday, but only for seniors at the middle and middle school level who were preparing for exams. The class size is cut no more than 30.

The number of new cases every day in China has fallen to a single figure, but the authorities remain wary of the possibility of a second wave of infection.

In the United States, which has the highest mortality rate in the world of more than 56,000, President Donald Trump said countries must “seriously consider” reopening their public schools before the end of the academic year, despite dozens already said it’s not safe for students to return until summer or fall.

“Some of you might start thinking about opening a school, because many people want to have a school opening,” Trump said. “Young people have done very well in this disaster.”

Trump also acknowledged the number of virus deaths could reach 70,000 in the US, after citing 60,000 in recent months.

The number of confirmed infections worldwide has risen to more than 3 million and the number of confirmed deaths has reached 211,000, according to the calculation by Johns Hopkins University. The actual number of pandemics is likely to be much higher because of limited testing, minor cases that are missed, deficiencies in counting the dead and a government that might try to hide the extent of its spread.

Italy, Spain, France and the UK each contributed more than 21,000 virus-related deaths.

In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro insisted that COVID-19 was only a “small flu” and said there was no need for a type of restriction that slowed the spread of infection elsewhere.

Brazil, the most populous country in Latin America with 211 million people, has reported 4,600 deaths and 67,000 confirmed infections. But the true number is believed to be much higher given the lack of tests and many people who have not sought hospital treatment.

Medical officials in Rio de Janeiro and at least four other major Brazilian cities have been warned But their hospital system is on the verge of collapse or too overwhelmed to take more patients. There are also signs that more and more Brazilian victims have died at home.

The federal government is urging that some countries begin to loosen COVID-19 restrictions. Many don’t seem to follow the guidelines issued by the White House. Member of the Coronavirus Task Force Dr. Deborah Birx said the state needed to find a county-by-county to determine whether it was safe to reopen or not.

“We have all the conditions here for a pandemic to be far more serious,” said Paulo Brandão, a virus expert at the University of Sao Paulo.

Bolsonaro said Brazilians need to continue their lives to prevent an economic crisis, but most state governors have implemented restrictions to keep people home and slow the spread of the virus.

New Zealand, on the other hand, reported only three new infections Tuesday. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said people had done extraordinary work in breaking the chain of transmission of the virus, but warned they needed to remain vigilant.

“Maybe there is still burning ash out there, and they have the potential to become a fire again, if we give them a chance,” he said, quoting a microbiologist.

The government is loosening its key, which has closed schools and most businesses. Surfers hit the waves at dawn on Tuesday, the builder returned to the construction site and the barista started the espresso machine.

In Australia, hundreds of people returned to the waters after Sydney’s iconic Bondi Beach reopened for swimmers and surfers. However, people can only use the beach during the day, cannot linger and are limited to ensure social distance. Australia has reported only 83 deaths from the virus, less than the number of victims reported by more than 25 U.S. states.

But this virus is still a long-term enemy. The president of the Japanese Medical Association, Yoshitake Yokokura, said he thought that would happen it is difficult to hold the Tokyo Summer Olympics which are rescheduled even in 2021 without an effective coronavirus vaccine.

Japan and the International Olympic Committee agreed to postpone the Tokyo 2020 Olympics until July 2021 because of a pandemic. Japan has been in a state of emergency for a month amid increasing infections and medical workers say hospitals are too burdened.


Becatoros reports from Athens, Greece and Perry from Wellington, New Zealand. Associated Press reporters around the world contributed to this report.

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