Tag Archives: Where

‘I don’t want to stay in New Zealand, stop completely’: KJ What detonates ‘high poppy syndrome’ in New Zealand | Instant News


New Zealand-born actor KJ Apa said his first role, on Shortland Street at age 16, gave him the technical training he needed to become who he is.

In an interview with actress Demi Moore, KJ Apa blew up “New Zealand high poppy syndrome” and said he didn’t want to stay in the country.

“In New Zealand, it’s hard to be yourself if you’re not confident enough,” he said, during a chat with Demi Moore that was published in Interview Magazine.

“I was 16 years old when I started making a soap called Shortland Street. I don’t know what I was doing, but I became a machine for learning dialogue, which is useful because they record 25 scenes a day. It gives me the technical training I need. I feel like You, because I don’t really want to live there, “he told Moore.

“I don’t want to live in New Zealand, totally quit. There is this thing in New Zealand called high poppy syndrome, where if you stand out, if you want to do something too big or you dress weird, people will give you a ***. and trying to cut you off. I remember going to LA for the first time and saying, ‘Dammit. This is what it’s like to be in a place where you can dress the way you want. Nobody cares if you’re gay or straight’, “the actor added.

After first appearing on camera on Shortland Street, KJ Apa landed his role in Riverdale when he was 18 years old.

“I barely remember who the man was. I was so naive. I haven’t even had a drink yet,” he said of the time.

Regardless of the problem with the way she says New Zealand views and reacts to successful people, the act says that, deep down, it will always be her home.

“Deep down, my home is in New Zealand. But when people ask me indifferently [where I’m from], I usually say LA. That’s my refuge now. My resting place, “he told Demi Moore.

In the interview, the Proposal Indecent actress asked KJ What do people really know about him, if they know him well.

“You will know that I support every major decision I make in my life,” he said.

KJ Apa and Demi Moore co-star in “Songbird”, directed by Michael Bay, which was released last October.

.



image source

Why French-inspired Akaroa is one of New Zealand’s most unique places | Instant News


Aerial view of the Akaroa waterfront, New Zealand. Photo / 123rf

At the pier at Akaroa Harbor, waves slamming lazily on the pile. Today’s harbor is milky white, the mud from the Rakaia and Rangitata rivers hanging in the water, having completed its long journey from the Southern Alps and across the Canterbury Plains. It turned out that the water turned powder blue from a distance, but from where we sat, it was icy cold and clear.

Just back from the water, diners sit under sunscreen on wicker chairs outside the Bully Hayes bar, and watch yachts and schooners bobbing on the sparkling water just steps away. A gull full of hope hovered overhead, watching the chip situation. From our point of view, cold beer in hand, this could be France on a sunny summer day – if it weren’t for the sound of Fat Freddy’s Drop bringing a breeze. And the fact in New Zealand that we are sitting in the caldera of an ancient, flooded volcano.

Akaroa has so many stories, and so much history, to unravel. Made by volcanoes, inhabited by Māori, founded by the French, claimed by the British.

It’s a French heritage largely traded in the city, but the city’s authenticity, albeit based on fact and history, comes with a hint of flicker – a medieval marketing tool for luring tourists to the city.

Old Akaroa lighthouse, Banks Peninsula.  Photo / 123rf
Old Akaroa lighthouse, Banks Peninsula. Photo / 123rf

It is true that this is Canterbury’s oldest city, and indeed it was founded by about 60 French settlers who arrived in 1840. But the French colonizers never got the right footing (the British quickly declared sovereignty over all of New Zealand to cut France off) and at The 1950s there is only one surviving example of French architecture in Akaroa – the courthouse, which is now part of the Akaroa Museum.

In the 1960s, French suddenly made a comeback – the city’s oldest streets with French origins were renamed “rue” and the modern identity of Akaroa began.

It is a very picturesque place, in a sheltered harbor surrounded by historic buildings and beautifully manicured gardens. It’s fun to walk along the “street”, to eat Toulouse sausages from a local butcher, or see posters for the annual “French festival”. To feel like you are in a place slightly different from other parts of New Zealand.

If you want to understand Akaroa’s history and heritage, a stop at the museum is a must. This is where we learn that Captain Jean-Francois de Surville was sailing these waters at the same time as Cook on the Endeavor, in the late 1760s. (Even though Cook named the area Banks Peninsula, he actually mistook it for an island). The French established themselves in the area, naming the bay of Port Louis-Philippe, creating a whaling and naval station, a doctor’s office, and a built road. For a time, French culture and language dominated.

The descendants of those 60 French settlers remain, and indeed lately, a French accent is heard, a more recent import from Europe. On the burial slopes of French L’Aube Hill, the names Pierre, Libeau and and Fleuri attest to the authenticity of the relationship.

Akaroa in the afternoon sun.  Photo / CCC
Akaroa in the afternoon sun. Photo / CCC

How to see Hector’s famous dolphin

The French may have lured us to the city, but it’s another famous resident we’d love to see today – Hector’s dolphin, one of the smallest dolphins in the world. Their number is disputed, but there is generally an agreement between 9,000 and 15,000 in the world. Here on the Banks Peninsula, about 1500 reside.

We went with Coast Up Close, a small business run by skipper and owner Tony, who has been taking tourists out on Wairiri – a fishing boat built in Invercargill – for 10 years. It’s the perfect day for that, with clear skies and clear water.

In fact dolphins prefer small shelters. Because sharks don’t use echo locations, they prefer to hunt when the water is clear. Dolphins like a little mud for camouflage. Even so, they didn’t keep their distance. As we emerged from the harbor, our first sighting occurred within minutes. In between the sightings, Tony commented on the port, geology and history of Akaroa.

Judging from the water, Akaroa’s natural setting is clearer. We sailed across a volcanic crater, been extinct for about 6 million years, and now inundated by the sea. This massive cone, which forms the backdrop of the Akaroa mountains, has been eroded to only two-thirds its size.

As we sailed further afield, we saw Ōnuku Marae from Ngai Tahu, and a pretty little church nearby, built in 1871, one of the oldest non-denominational churches in New Zealand. Between dolphins, we saw red-billed gulls and white pigeons circling, taking advantage of the hunting of kahawai under the waves, pushing bait fish to the surface.

Hector's Jumping Dolphins at Akaroa Harbor.  Photo / Tony Muir
Hector’s Jumping Dolphins at Akaroa Harbor. Photo / Tony Muir

The benefits of a small boat aren’t just the comments and personal service you get from the captain. It’s also maneuverable, getting you straight to the shoreline and around (and sometimes through) rock. They do things a little differently on this ship. If the dolphins show up, that’s fine, but if they don’t, it’s up to them – captain Tony won’t chase them. He has been known to jump from the side when he wants a little fishing. On our return trip, a free diver approached his kayak to chat, and showed him the catch of the day – quinine and cray. He’s 75 years old. The young backpackers on the ship were flabbergasted.

But dolphins are stars and whenever they appear the deck is filled with oohs and aahs. They easily approached, surfed in the pressure waves that the hulls created beneath the surface, ducked and dived in front of us.

Back ashore at Akaroa

Back on land, like Mad Dogs and Englishmen, we took a walk in the midday sun. The small town is divided in two by a promenade, where locals and visitors stroll among the shops and cafes. But summer days can get very hot here. As in Europe, on hot days the locals retreated inside, or into the beautiful flower-filled gardens lining the streets, the roses falling on the wooden fences.

We walked to the ocean end of the Rue Balguerie, and watched the kids bomb from the pier, then came back and found ourselves at Harbar, a small restaurant and beach bar situated directly on the water, overlooking the French Bay. We settle for cold beer, gin-soaked mussels and fries, and watch the boat toss around. It may be summer on the Riviera, but here, a unique slice of Aotearoa.

Get out at the harbor and see the dolphins

Hectors dolphins are a must. Coast Up Close takes you out on their little kauri launch, allowing you to get up close and personal with the incredible dolphins, seals, sea caves and cliffs of the Banks Peninsula. The 2.5 hour cruise leaves twice a day. coastupclose.co.nz

Go sea kayaking with penguins

Across the Banks Peninsula, you’ll find the Pōhatu Marine Reserve, which is home to the largest Little Penguin colony on mainland New Zealand. Day trips on the Pohatu Penguins will pick you up from Akaroa, take you on a scenic tour with stops, across the peninsula, then sends you out into the water to see penguins as well as seals, seabirds and other wildlife. pohatu.co.nz

Walk the Banks Track

This three day and three night hike is a hidden gem. New Zealand’s oldest private walk offers stunning views through farms and forests, charming accommodation – and some well-worth the hike. It’s just enough challenge to make you feel good enough about yourself. Along the way, you’ll find up-close wildlife, unique huts, and the picturesque Hinewai Nature Reserve, an ecological restoration project. It is self-catering, but package carts are included. For an extra $ 50, you can have a chilled cabin that is driven into the cottage, so you don’t have to skimp on wine, cheese, and sausages. bankstrack.co.nz

A hiker along the Banks Track.  Photo / Alister Winter
A hiker along the Banks Track. Photo / Alister Winter

Visit the Giant’s House

The Giant’s House is a sculpture garden created by artist Josie Martin. This is an eccentric Gaudi-esque mosaic display, including sculptures of animals, people, flowers and chairs. You can walk there from town – walk straight down Rue Balguerie from Beach Rd. thegiantshouse.co.nz

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newfinder.co.nz and newzealand.com

.



image source

Where Microsoft bought New Zealand’s $ 100 million-plus land | Instant News


Inside Microsoft data centers in the UK. Photo / Microsoft

Microsoft has bought land to develop New Zealand’s first data center for $ 100 million plus in a move praised last year by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

Now the exact location of the site can be revealed.

.



image source

Where are New Zealand’s Best Beaches? Nominate your favorites in our national search | Instant News


Travel

Whangamatā was named New Zealand’s best beach in 2018. But could it take the top spot again? Photo / Getty Images

We’re looking for the best beaches in the country – and we need your help.

That HeraldsThe Best Beach Series will run through January and it all starts with an entry from Heralds readers, so let us know which beaches you think are the best in New Zealand.

We are a nation of beach lovers, and many of us have favorites – whether it’s an everyday local for morning walks, or a beloved vacation spot you spend a few weeks each year on. But which stretch of sand is the best in the country?

We were last crowned the winner in 2018, with thousands of votes and tough competition seeing Whangamata come top.

“A worthy winner, Whangamata holds a special place for many New Zealanders,” said Best Beach 2018 judge Matt Williams, chief executive of Surf Life Saving NZ’s northern region.

“Much of its valuable status comes from its unique coastal environment. It is a beach that has been widely accessed and guarded by lifeguards at the Waikato Whangamata Surf Life Saving Club Trust since December 1949.”

Will favorite Coromandel claim the crown again this year, or can you help put your favorite beach into the top spot?

Everything is up to you. We want you to nominate your favorites, tell us why you love this beach and what makes it so special.

What is the quality of the sand and waves? Local amenities that make it perfect for the whole whānau? Is it easy to reach? Or does her remoteness add to her charm?

Send us a photo of your favorite beach, too, and we’ll profile some of your entries over the summer.

Nominations are open until the end of Sunday, January 10. From there, your entries will be counted and the top 10 most popular beaches will be named as our finalists, with the bonus of three wildcard entries selected by Heralds Travel team. You can then select one beach from the top 13 beaches to be crowned the ultimate winner.

Any stretch of New Zealand’s coastline can top the list, anywhere in the country, from the tip of Northland to the bottom of Stewart Island. Outlying places can be nominated as big name favorites. The lakeside beach is also worth considering.

While we’re enjoying a much-needed summer vacation, it’s a great time to do some research.

Grab your towel, apply sunscreen and head to the nearest beach to see if it matches our 2018 winners.

Once you’ve had enough of everything your beach has to offer – and yes, ice cream is an important part of the research process – open up nzherald.co.nz/bestbeach to submit your nominations.

May the best beaches win.

.



image source

Prison drama: Police are still in Waikeria Prison where 19 inmates burn mattresses on the roof | Instant News


View of the Waikeria Prison where the inmates are on the roof mattress that had been burning since last night. Photo / Provided

Emergency services remain at the Waikeria Prison this morning after arriving yesterday to negotiate with inmates out of control on the burning mattress on the roof.

The Specialist Advanced Control and Control Team, made up of staff from various prisons, has been in the prison where inmates rioted since Tuesday afternoon.

It is understood that the situation is ongoing this morning, but Correction has not provided an update. Photos emailed to NZME late at night showed huge smoke clouds visible from neighboring farmland.

Police, firefighters and St. John were at the scene yesterday as Correction officers continued to try to negotiate with the inmates and ensure the safety of everyone in the prison.

A spokesman said 19 detainees had been seen on the roof of the building. This includes those who were involved in lighting the fire on the previous page today, along with several other people who were able to get out of their cells with assistance.

“Prisoners can access some parts of the building by penetrating the roof space, but their movement inside the building is restricted by internal gates, barriers and secure doors.

“There was a large amount of smoke around the building coming from the mattresses burned by the prisoners.”

Although there is no threat to public safety, Corrections staff have transferred 49 inmates from one unit to another in the prison while the incident continues.

“There are about 230 prisoners in total in the ‘top prison’ facility and we will not hesitate to evacuate further detainees if necessary to keep them safe.”

FENZ was initially summoned to Waikeria after inmates lit several fires in the prison’s practice yard on Tuesday afternoon.

About 20 prisoners were using the courtyard at the time.

The situation was thought to be under control before the nine detainees refused to comply with the instructions, Newshub reported.

The perpetrators allegedly removed the toilet door from their hinges and used it as a weapon against staff.

Correctional Association President Alan Whitley said the union is offering support.

“We are always concerned about people when situations like this occur, but we have a special team that has special training, they are professional people and they will do a professional job to control the situation,” Whitley told RNZ.

St John’s staff treated a number of staff and inmates for smoke inhalation. Earlier in the evening, it was thought that at least one inmate was bleeding after an argument with guards.

One detained inmate said riots in the prison were imminent, with inmates protesting for human rights. They claim there are problems in the prison, including toilet paper that is taking days, Newshub reports.

Last year, two Waikeria Prison Correction officers were punched in the face within days, while clashes between prisoners have also been reported.

An inmate punched an officer in the face and another officer was also injured when he stepped in to help.

The fight occurred after an officer was threatened and punched a few days earlier.

There have also been previous reports of inmates fighting amongst themselves.

The Waikeria Prison is one of New Zealand’s largest prisons, located on a 1,200ha site south of Te Awamutu in the Waikato region.

The ‘top prison’ where convicts currently reside were built in 1911 and are the oldest part of the prison. It was replaced by a new facility under construction at the prison and which is slated to open in 2022.

Premium Subscription

.



image source