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Here comes the new USA Team Olympics uniform Fashion style | Instant News


About the photo: A fire burns in an Olympic cauldron after being lit during the opening ceremony of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, August 6, 2016.

The Associated Press has covered every modern Olympics, and that includes photos of the Olympic flames along the torch relay route and on the cauldron.

The Olympic flame was introduced at the 1928 Amsterdam Olympics. The torch relay started eight years later on the eve of the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

The flames began their life at a lighting ceremony in Ancient Olympia, where the original Olympics were held for centuries.

Over the years, the flames have played an increasingly large role at opening ceremonies, with the identity of the final torchbearer – often a great former Olympian from the host country – becoming a hot topic of discussion.

Muhammad Ali, gold medalist at the 1960 Rome Olympics, lit the torch at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. Four years later, Cathy Freeman lit a fire in Sydney and was the only person to light a cauldron and win a gold medal in the same event.

One of the most memorable lights came at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics when Paralympic archer Antonio Rebollo fired a flaming arrow over the cauldron, igniting gas from within.

The torch relay for the postponed Tokyo Olympics starts Thursday, but don’t expect to find out the name of the person who lit the cauldron on July 23 at the opening ceremony until sometime before it happens.

And when that happens, the AP will be there to document it.

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Australian Olympics prepare for the Tokyo Olympics like no other | Buffalo Sports | Instant News


SYDNEY (AP) – Australian athletes are preparing for a match like no other when the Tokyo Olympics kicks off on 23 July – 100 days from Wednesday.

Among other pandemic restrictions in Tokyo, the Olympics will have no family or friends watching them live in Japan, they will arrive and leave within days of their competition and their movement outside the Olympic Village will be restricted.

“They know that this is going to be a very different game, and not having family and friends is certainly disappointing to a lot of people,” Australian chef de mission Ian Chesterman said Wednesday.

The Tokyo Olympics were postponed a year after coronavirus travel restrictions made it impossible to hold them in 2020.

“We are doing everything in our power to get the team to and from matches safely and, of course, to give them every opportunity to look their best when that moment comes,” added Chesterman.

Australia plans to send 450 to 480 athletes and about 1,000 support staff to Tokyo. Most of them have not been vaccinated against COVID-19, and that could hamper athletes’ plans to compete internationally ahead of matches.

“We are in discussion with the office of Minister (Health) (Greg) Hunt every week,” AOC chief executive Matt Carroll said Wednesday. “We didn’t expect athletes or officials to be vaccinated at this time, so we weren’t frustrated. The time of crisis starts next month, because athletes will start going abroad. The government is well aware of that. “

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Swiss program plans a post-COVID future for science, diplomacy | World | Instant News


By JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press

GENEVA (AP) – With COVID-19, space exploration and climate change coming to the attention of many, the so-called “do tank” in Geneva, financed by the Swiss government, is gearing up to develop long-term scientific projects, ranging from global courts to disputes. scientific efforts for the Manhattan Project’s style to clean excess carbon from the atmosphere.

Supporters of the Geneva Science and Diplomacy Anticipator want to bridge the image of the Swiss city as a conflict resolution center with visionary scientific ambitions on big-picture issues, including the future of humanity.

First created in late 2019, GESDA presented its first activity report on Tuesday and announced plans for a summit in October that will bring together hundreds of United Nations officials, Nobel laureates, academics, diplomats, representatives of advocacy groups and members of the public.

Supporters of this initiative include the heads of top universities in Switzerland and the world’s largest atomic destroyer, which is located at the European nuclear research organization CERN. They said the coronavirus pandemic has provided science with an invisible platform for decades and wanted to draw on the attention of the public health crisis that has claimed nearly 3 million lives and devastated the economy to encourage thinking about the interaction between science, politics and society.

Peter Brabeck, former chairman and CEO of Nestle who was appointed by the Swiss government to lead GESDA, uses COVID-19 as an example of how prior planning can help prevent future health crises, noting that the mRNA vaccine technology used now to fight the pandemic has been around for a decade.

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Swiss program plans a post-COVID future for science, diplomacy | World | Instant News


By JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press

GENEVA (AP) – With COVID-19, space exploration and climate change coming to the attention of many, the so-called “do tank” in Geneva, financed by the Swiss government, is gearing up to develop long-term scientific projects, ranging from global courts to disputes. scientific efforts for the Manhattan Project’s style to clean excess carbon from the atmosphere.

Supporters of the Geneva Science and Diplomacy Anticipator want to bridge the image of the Swiss city as a conflict resolution center with visionary scientific ambitions on big-picture issues, including the future of humanity.

First created in late 2019, GESDA presented its first activity report on Tuesday and announced plans for a summit in October that will bring together hundreds of United Nations officials, Nobel laureates, academics, diplomats, representatives of advocacy groups and members of the public.

Supporters of this initiative include the heads of top universities in Switzerland and the world’s largest atomic destroyer, which is located at the European nuclear research organization CERN. They said the coronavirus pandemic has provided science with an invisible platform for decades and wanted to draw on the attention of the public health crisis that has claimed nearly 3 million lives and devastated the economy to encourage thinking about the interaction between science, politics and society.

Peter Brabeck, former chairman and CEO of Nestle who was appointed by the Swiss government to lead GESDA, uses COVID-19 as an example of how prior planning can help prevent future health crises, noting that the mRNA vaccine technology used now to fight the pandemic has been around for a decade.

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Australia rules out adding J&J vaccine to inoculation plans | World | Instant News


But the government shrugged off the target after notifying last week that Pfizer is now the preferred choice for people under 50 because of the potential risk of rare blood clots associated with AstraZeneca.

A man in the state of Victoria who received an injection of AstraZeneca on March 22 had to be hospitalized for a blood clot. The second case was reported Tuesday of a woman who was inoculated in the state of Western Australia and admitted to hospital in Darwin, regulators said in a statement.

With 700,000 doses of AstraZeneca injected in Australia since early March, the two cases are equivalent to a frequency of freezing 1-in-350,000, regulators said. British authorities say the risk of such blood clots is 1 in 250,000 in the country.

The government has doubled Pfizer’s orders to 40 million doses and Hunt said shipments of an additional 20 million doses were expected in the last three months of 2021.

“That means a significant sprint for those who weren’t vaccinated by then,” said Hunt, referring to the government’s hopes of having the population inoculated this year.

Australia hopes to deliver 4 million doses of the two vaccines by the end of March, but only injected 1.2 million doses on Monday.

An 80-year-old Australian man on Monday became Australia’s first COVID-19 death this year and 910 since the pandemic began.

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