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Body found: Auckland businessman has been looking forward to living with a new partner | Instant News


Elizabeth Zhong was reported missing from her Auckland home on Friday. Photo / Provided

Elizabeth (Ying) Zhong is a grandmother who has been looking forward to living her life with her new partner, a friend told the Herald.

A body believed to belong to a 55-year-old businesswoman who was reported missing from East Manukau District was found yesterday afternoon.

A source told the Herald that the body was lifted from a vehicle several streets away from his $ 2 million house in Sunnyhills, but police would not confirm this.

Police said the identification of the remains had not been confirmed, but the death was being treated as unexplained and an investigation was underway.

Detective Inspector Shaun Vickers said a post-mortem would be carried out today and the police would provide further information whenever possible.

In his prime, Zhong was a sponsor of projects and festivals – including the 2017 Asia Pacific Film festival.

“I was very surprised to hear the news that he was leaving,” said the friend, who requested anonymity.

“The last time we met, he introduced me to his new partner and we also talked about his daughter and grandson in Wellington, and he is looking forward to living his new life.”

Zhong came to New Zealand with her ex-husband and daughter in 1997. Her daughter now works at the Ministry of Finance in Wellington.

She separated from her husband in 2017, and has a new partner, a property developer.

Police guarded property in the eastern Auckland suburb of Sunnyhills this morning.  Photo / Hayden Woodward
Police guarded property in the eastern Auckland suburb of Sunnyhills this morning. Photo / Hayden Woodward

Her friend, who is also a business partner, described her as a “smart businesswoman” and respected by many in the film industry.

The Herald understands that Zhong was also a close associate of the late Jihong Lu, and had had talks with controversial theater promoters at an early stage about being part of the failed production of City of 100 Lovers.

Zhong is also actively working with investors from China, and hosts visiting delegations – such as one from Shanxi who came in 2018 – to his vineyard.

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Zhong is a businesswoman with many company director positions. She was reported missing from her Sunnyhills home and was last seen on Friday afternoon.

Last night several police cars were seen outside his house after his body was found.

Her ex-husband Frank Fu declined to comment when contacted by the Herald this morning.

Zhong has had health problems recently, and is the sole owner and director of the two winemaking companies who are now recipients – Kennedy Point Vineyard on Waiheke Island and Carrick’s wine in Central Otago.

He is also the sole owner and director of the film production company Digital Post Ltd, Digipost Entertainment and related companies.

Digipost offers animation and computer graphics, film post-production, sound mixing and visual effects.

Credits that have been engaged by the company include Mosely, Ash versus Evil Dad, Mt Zion, Spartacus, Love Birds, and 30 Days of Night.

Its website states: “Digipost is New Zealand’s most experienced visual effects and post production company dedicated to realizing the creative endeavors of our clients, providing the highest quality service to the film, advertising and television industries.”

In 2018, Variety reported that Zhong and Digipost were part of a “three-way development and finance deal” with Tim White’s Southern Light Films and Super Entertainment for a live-action fantasy film CGI Shelved worth up to $ 56 million.

Variety reports the film is about “two lazy robots restless about being replaced by humans.” The film, which involves NZ-born Shrek director Andrew Adamson, will be a New Zealand-China co-production.

The police continued to request information on Mr. Zhong’s death. People are asked to call 105, citing file number 201128/1909, or Polres Manukau on 09 2611 321 if they have further information.

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The missing woman at Manukau Auckland | Instant News


Elizabeth Zhong aka Ying Zhong of Sunnyhills has not been seen since Friday afternoon. Photo / Provided

An Auckland businesswoman with several company directorships has disappeared in the Manukau area.

Police said Elizabeth (Ying) Zhong, 55, was reported missing from her Sunnyhills home this morning and was last seen on Friday afternoon.

Several police cars were outside his Auckland home on Saturday night.

“Police and Elizabeth’s family are concerned about her welfare and want to hear from anyone who may have seen her, or who knows where she is,” police said.

“He is about 160cm tall and slender in stature, and is probably a walk in the eastern area of ​​Manukau County.

“Anyone who can help the police find Elizabeth is required to call the number 105 citation file 201128/1909.”

Zhong, who has experienced health problems recently, is the sole owner and director of two winemaking companies who are now recipients – Kennedy Point Vineyard on Waiheke Island and Carrick’s wine in Central Otago.

He is also the sole owner and director of the film production company Digital Post Ltd, Digipost Entertainment and related companies.

Digipost offers animation and computer graphics, film post-production, sound mixing and visual effects.

Credits that have been engaged by the company include Mosely, Ash versus Evil Dad, Mt Zion, Spartacus, Love Birds, and 30 Days of Night.

Its website states: “Digipost is New Zealand’s most experienced visual effects and post production company dedicated to realizing the creative endeavors of our clients, providing the highest quality service to the film, advertising and television industries.”

In 2018, Variety reported that Zhong and Digipost were part of a “three-way development and finance deal” with Tim White’s Southern Light Films and Super Entertainment for a live-action fantasy film CGI Shelved worth up to $ 56 million.

Variety reports the film is about “two lazy robots restless about being replaced by humans.” The film, which involves NZ-born Shrek director Andrew Adamson, will be a New Zealand-China co-production.

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A New Zealand baby with a life-threatening disease is stranded with her parents in Ireland | Instant News


James and Elizabeth Dunne are eager to return to New Zealand with baby Harrison. Photo / Provided

There is a growing hope that a New Zealand baby born in Europe with a life-threatening disease can come home in time for Christmas to meet with her extended family.

New Zealand mother Elizabeth Dunne gave birth to her son Harrison in Ireland in September after she traveled there with her husband James to seek medical help after suffering a previous miscarriage.

But Harrison came into a world “not breathing or moving”.

She was diagnosed with myotubular myopathy, a genetic condition that makes her muscles weak and she relies on a ventilator to help her breathe.

Informed that the healthiest option for Harrison and his family was to return to New Zealand, the Dunnes were shocked to learn that they would need to charter a specialist medical plane for € 250,000 – nearly NZ $ 430,000.

However, the fee was lowered to € 70,000, less than NZ $ 100,000, in the last day or two after doctors concluded that specialist aircraft were not required for Harrison to fly home.

A Gofundme page now set up to help the family raise money and go home, James’s father told Irish radio station Beat.

“As a parent, you want what’s best for your children in normal situations, but put that in a hyper-nightmare situation and then add to the world pandemic, and give 14,000 kilometers between you and the place you want to be,” he said.

James and Elizabeth Dunne are eager to return to New Zealand with baby Harrison.  Photo / Provided
James and Elizabeth Dunne are eager to return to New Zealand with baby Harrison. Photo / Provided

The nightmare diagnosis for baby Harrison came after the Dunnes family suffered multiple heartbreaks trying to give birth.

The young family, who have taken over the Palmerston North Aqaba cafe from Elizabeth’s parents, have had four miscarriages.

Elizabeth also had a molar pregnancy, a complication in which the tissue around a fertilized egg develops abnormally to form a mass that needs to be removed.

They then traveled to Ireland, where James’s parents lived, to meet with doctors, who had helped women with a history of miscarriage to have a successful birth.

There was no indication that anything was wrong with the pregnancy until baby Harrison was born “drooping” and unable to move.

Mum Elizabeth told Irish station Beat that there had been developments at Harrison since she was born and that they were “holding on to hope.”

However, there is no cure for her condition and doctors have told them not to expect her to live long.

“There is no drug, clinical trial, surgery or drug that will fix Harrison. All we can control is the life we ​​provide for him,” the family said on their Gofundme website.

Elizabeth said her family was “trying to live the best possible life” in every precious moment spent together.

Because of this they have had “a lot of discussion with doctors about quality of life”, he said.

This ultimately led to the belief that returning to New Zealand was important so that they could be near their support network and give Harrison the “happiest and most fulfilling life”.

Baby Harrison was born with myotubular myopathy, a genetic condition that weakens his muscles and relies on a ventilator to breathe.  Photo / Provided
Baby Harrison was born with myotubular myopathy, a genetic condition that weakens his muscles and relies on a ventilator to breathe. Photo / Provided

But there are also medical reasons.

Specialists told the family it was important to protect Harrison from illness for the next two years because even the common cold can be difficult for him to recover from.

“New Zealand is currently moving towards more favorable weather for Harrison and giving him the best possible start before the next cold and flu season,” the couple said.

“For this reason we are eager to be home before Christmas, when summer really starts. All we have now is time with him.”

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Amazon workers in Germany to go on strike on ‘Black Friday’ | Instant News


FILE PHOTO: Amazon logo depicted outside the company’s JFK8 distribution center in Staten Island, New York, USA November 25, 2020. REUTERS / Brendan McDermid.

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The Verdi trade union asked workers at seven German Amazon warehouses to go on a three-day strike that will coincide with a “Black Friday” discount shopping sale on November 27.

Scheduled to start with Wednesday’s night shift, Verdi is demanding better pay and working conditions. Verdi has been organizing strikes on Amazon in Germany – the company’s biggest market after the United States – since 2013, most recently last month during a “Prime Day” promotional event.

An Amazon spokesperson said at the time that the company offered a “very good” salary, with benefits and working conditions comparable to other important employers.

The US retail giant has seen sales soar globally as restrictions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus send consumers online, making it difficult for some brick and mortar stores to compete.

Verdi argues this strengthens the case for higher wages, adding workers are not adequately protected from the spread of the coronavirus.

Last week, Amazon bowed to government pressure in France to postpone its local Black Friday event a week to help local shop owners struggling with a nationwide lockdown.

Reporting by Christoph Steitz; Edited by Kirsten Donovan

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Brazil faces a $ 112 billion refinancing gap in early 2021 | Instant News


BRASILIA, Nov 24 (Reuters) – Brazil’s debt has swelled to unprecedented levels due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the government faces a $ 112 billion refinancing gap early next year, with April funding needs the highest for a month.

Publicly, at least, Treasury officials in Latin America’s top economies insist there will be no problems getting investors to lend to them. The so-called liquidity cushion can cover at least three months of the loan.

In addition, nearly all of Brazil’s debt is denominated in reais and more than 90% of it is held by domestic investors, many of whom are forced to hold it by banking regulations.

Financial analysts also see little risk of a boycott by lenders, which is likely to trigger a serious crisis and wreak havoc on Brazilian financial markets.

But the likelihood that the Ministry of Finance may have difficulty repaying debts, due to sudden unfavorable political, economic or market conditions, is not zero. And it will likely pay a premium to shift so much debt at once, analysts say.

According to Treasury Department figures, about 605 billion reais ($ 112 billion) of domestic federal debt is due in the first four months of next year. That’s 14.1% of Brazil’s 4.82 trillion reais pile of domestic debt.

The month to watch is April, when the 283 billion reais of debt will need to be extended. That is 6.6% of Brazil’s debt and will be the largest single month of maturity debt on record, according to the Ministry of Finance.

“It’s a huge number, and if people want to reduce their exposure a little bit for whatever reason, that’s a significant amount,” said Sergi Lanau, deputy chief economist at the Washington-based Institute of International Finance (IIF).

“It’s not a good situation, but it would be much worse if it was foreign debt. We are not too worried about the pile maturing. If something goes wrong at that point, then you will be exposed,” he said. the word.

The IIF analysis shows that the government’s domestic debt maturing in April amounts to 3.7% of GDP, also an all-time high for a month.

Economy Minister Paulo Guedes said he saw “no problem” for the Ministry of Finance to reimburse the debt. About half of the 600 billion reais due early next year may already be covered by cash inflows from central banks and public sector banks, he said.

STEP CURVE

The government’s surprisingly aggressive fiscal response to the pandemic, particularly through direct income transfers to the poor, has driven its deficits and debt to records that are far above most other developing economies.

Brazil’s main deficit, excluding interest payments, is estimated at nearly 12% of GDP this year, with overall debt rising to around 95% of GDP, according to the government.

That has forced the Treasury Department to borrow more, more and more in short dated paper because it’s cheaper and as growing concerns around the fiscal outlook mean investors are reluctant to lend to the government long-term loans.

While reducing average debt maturity lengths and record low official interest rates have brought average interest costs down to a record low, the so-called “roll over risk” for the Treasury has increased sharply.

“The problem is if we can’t sell any bonds. But we don’t have to worry too much, there’s money in the system,” said an interest rates specialist at a hedge fund in Sao Paulo.

“The treasury won’t run out of cash: that’s not the case. But it will continue to pay higher interest rates and see a steeper curve,” he said.

The difference between long-term and short-term interest rates has widened sharply. Before the pandemic, the difference between the January 2022 and January 2027 futures rates was 180 basis points or less. That tripled to 460 basis points in September, and is now creeping back to that all-time peak.

The Treasury has failed to sell the full allocation of bonds offered at several auctions in recent weeks, both the fixed rate ‘LTN’ note and the floating rate ‘LTF’ note linked to the central bank’s official Selic rate.

To attract buyers, the Ministry of Finance has to pay a higher premium. It also relies on other sources of financing, including a recent transfer of 325 billion reais from the central bank.

Waldery Rodrigues, special secretary of the economy ministry, said last week that a central bank selling part of its foreign currency reserves to pay debt is “on the menu” for next year, although the decision rests with the central bank.

($ 1 = 5.40 reais)

(Reporting by Jamie McGeever; Editing by Tom Brown)

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