Tag Archives: year

The KU Academic Council establishes a body to seek legal opinion on government advertising | Instant News



The Academic Council of Karachi University has set up a five-member committee to solicit legal opinions regarding provincial government advertisements on two-year bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Prof Dr Jamil Hassan Kazmi has been appointed as committee organizer, while Dr Zaheer, Dr Nasiruddin Khan, Dr Anila Amber Malik and Dr Naeem Khalid from the campus side are members.

The committee was formed during a meeting chaired by Karachi University Deputy Chancellor Prof Dr Khalid Mahmood Iraqi on Monday. It was also decided that admission to the MPhil and PhD programs for 2021 will be awarded according to the university’s existing admission policies.

The meeting decided that a detailed report on the new PhD policy recently introduced by the Higher Education Commission-Pakistan would be sent to HEC as the university needed some clarification.

KU will conduct a written test for the MPhil, PhD, MS, MD 2021 programs, which were postponed last year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The meeting also decided that an ordinary student, having obtained a master’s degree in the morning program from Karachi University, would qualify to take another master’s degree in any department in the evening program.

Likewise it was decided that permission would be granted to students wishing to enter a diploma program in any of the evening programs after completing studies in the morning program.

In addition, the Academic Council approved Prof. Dr. Iqbal Azhar, Prof. Dr. Nasreen Fatima, and Prof. Dr. Maqsood Ali Ansari as candidates for the Academic Council of the Faculty of Education Council for three years.

The council changed the name of the MS Anesthesiology Program to MD Anesthesiology. In addition, he also approved the minutes of the Academic Council meeting held on November 16, 2020, and minutes of the Advanced Research and Research Agency meetings held on October 22, November 26, and December 23, 2019.

Furthermore, members of the Academic Council also approved the meeting of the Council of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences which was to be held on September 5, 2019 and February 16, 2021.

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Three pickpockets who have robbed bus passengers for years are in detention | Instant News


Karachi’s Special Investigation Unit (SIU) personnel on Saturday announced the arrest of three pickpockets allegedly involved in robbing residents on public transport.

SIU head Haider Raza said that according to information shared by law enforcement agencies, a group of three pickpockets had been operating in different parts of the city for several years and seizing cash, cell phones and other valuables from passengers. They are also suspected of being involved in drug trafficking and robbery.

Pickpockets carry weapons and explosives when committing crimes.

Raza said all SUI teams were directed to order these people through informants and technical assistance.

As directed, SIU CIA Karachi personnel carried out raids based on intelligence and technical information and managed to capture Yousuf Masih, his son Habeel Masih alias Adil from Surjani City and Naseer from New Karachi with explosives and banned weapons.

The case has been registered at the SIU Police Station. The suspects revealed that they had been pickpocketing for years on Bilal, X-23, Khan Coach, N-4 and F-11 buses in Liaquatabad, Shafiq Morr, Lyari and other areas. Yousuf Masih used to steal cell phones from passenger pockets and his son would open them. After unlocking the phone, Yousuf sold it on the open market / Sunday market. Four stolen cell phones were also found on the suspects.

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‘Incredible’ – New Zealand war hero Bert Hansen’s handwritten manuscript from World War I found | Instant News


Kath and Stan Hansen have found a stack of letters and documents belonging to Stan Bert’s father, who was a Kiwi war hero from World War I. Video / Dean Purcell

Stan Hansen waited 80 years to open the brown suitcase tucked away at the top of his parents’ wardrobe that keeps a written history of his father’s war years.

The recorded memories of veteran Bert Hansen’s seven months as a German prisoner in Belgium during World War I are too painful to pass up while still alive.

“My father would not talk about war even if he appeared in it,” said Hansen.

But the deep memory of Stan’s childhood is that of his father’s whining from exposure to mustard gas: “he just coughed, coughed, coughed.”

With Stan having only a “vague consciousness” that grew out of his father’s experiences as a prisoner of war, the brown suitcase takes on a kind of mythological meaning.

“It’s in the wardrobe in their bedroom and it’s absolutely no no. We kids are not allowed to come near it,” said the 88-year-old.

“The first time I touched the bag, I was actually pictured with my dad in Christchurch as a kid aged 3, with my dad carrying my suitcase.

“It will be 80 years [since] I have the opportunity to touch it, because it is sacred. “

After Bert Hansen’s death in 1951 at the age of 53, the suitcase belonged to his youngest son, Arthur, who for his own reasons kept its contents a secret.

“He’s a tough guy to deal with at the best of times,” said Stan of his younger brother.

“The saddest part for me was that while growing up, my oldest brother, Jim, who should have been the right person to at least read the memoirs, died without seeing him.

“We know there is something valuable enough for my father on the top shelf in the cupboard in his bedroom.”

A postcard sent to Bert Hansen in the 1920s from a priest who lived near the site of the Kiwi escape.  Photo / Dean Purcell
A postcard sent to Bert Hansen in the 1920s from a priest who lived near the site of the Kiwi escape. Photo / Dean Purcell

With Arthur’s death in January this year, the brown suitcase was finally accessible to Stan and his remaining older sisters.

Stan’s daughter, Sue, said she could barely stand from her shock when the suitcase was finally opened at their Point Chevalier home.

Inside is a 109-page handwritten manuscript detailing his father’s arrest at age 22 in northeastern France, at Meteren on April 16, 1918, during the German Spring Offensive.

Bert was able to escape twice from the prison hospital where he was and was protected by Belgian underground resistance until the Armistice took effect on November 11, 1918.

Stan’s wife, Kath, was as stunned by the document as her husband.

“[It was a record] about his gruesome adventures from the day he was arrested until the Armistice, “he said.

“During that time he was in six different prisons in France or Belgium, almost dying, as did hundreds of others in those prisons. He escaped twice, and I understand he is the only Kiwi soldier who escaped twice from detention. Germany in the West. Home. “

Kath and Stan Hansen for finding countless letters and documents belonging to Stan Bert's father, a Kiwi war hero.  Photo / Dean Purcell
Kath and Stan Hansen for finding countless letters and documents belonging to Stan Bert’s father, a Kiwi war hero. Photo / Dean Purcell

Perhaps even more interesting in this case is Bert’s post-war correspondence with French citizens who helped him during his imprisonment and escape.

“The most interesting thing is a lot of French documents. Most of them are letters,” said Kath.

“It seems that in 1924 and 25 he corresponded with local residents in and around the church where he made his first escape. The parish priest at the time sent him three postcards of this church, which had been turned into a victim cleaning station.”

A translation of a postcard sent to Bert in 1924 from a pastor named A. Guidon at St Peter’s Church in Chains in Leuze-en-Hainaut, West Belgium, provides an overview of the type of correspondence.

“You will find annexed a card (interior view) of our church converted into a prison (as you know),” Guidon wrote in French to Bert.

“Despite the fact that the Germans wanted to hide your escape, we are well aware of it. One of the men who gave you the food (which we offered) gave us assurance about your disappearance.

“Would you be kind enough to tell us if there were any civilians involved in your escape. Who gave you civilian clothes? Who protected you? If someone really helped you, we’d be happy to respect that.”

Bert Hansen's 109-page manuscript.  Photo / Dean Purcell
Bert Hansen’s 109-page manuscript. Photo / Dean Purcell

Fr. Guidon ended by asking Bert to send him some New Zealand stamps for his collection.

Kath said she intends to write her own book over the next two years, including manuscripts and various other correspondence found in the briefcase.

He believes Bert planned to do the same in the 1920s before the project was put on hold.

Bert has described in a 1919 article the hunger and forced labor he endured during the seven month cycle of arrest, flee, arrest and flee in France and Belgium.

“As I went through all these papers, I got the impression Bert might have gathered information other than his own story because he was going to write something better and bigger,” said Kath.

“In the last few pages I found about three or four little notes on the side that reinforce my theory that he was actually going to write something else.”

Bert Hansen, center, in Europe during World War I. The photo confused his family.  Photo / Dean Purcell
Bert Hansen, center, in Europe during World War I. The photo confused his family. Photo / Dean Purcell

The photo of Bert dressed in clothing in Europe during the war also intrigued Hansen’s family.

“How could he dress like that?” Stan asked. “He is a prisoner.”

Sue Hansen said she plans to return to Europe to retrace the many sites mentioned in the manuscript.

“This is a story that continues to grow, it’s incredible,” he said. “The internet helps, but it’s like a puzzle. We have most of the outside but we are missing a lot of the inside. With these things, it doesn’t seem like a huge number but it really is. It’s quite old and people are getting old. we even have this.

Sue will also meet two historians the family has contacted over the past two months.

“Our two main local contacts are in Belgium, one has a museum, the other is publishing for academics, and they’ve got into their network and all of a sudden all these people are saying ‘hey, we want to get involved’,” says Sue.

“I have taken lots of photos and sent them to Europe, the embassies. Churches are fascinated by these writings because many of them were destroyed.”

Stan says his travel days are over, but just being able to read his father’s handwritten words describing a story he could never tell while he was alive is more than enough.

“Oh, that’s incredible. It’s an extraordinary story. It’s incredible that he can actually move and get so many people to help him in occupied Belgium,” he said.

“Until the end of January this year I had never seen them. To me this is a complete discovery.”

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Prince Philip’s Death: Fifty years of royal visit to New Zealand | Instant News


He was born in Greece, attended schools in France, Germany and Scotland, trained in England and served in World War II naval theater in the Indian Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

And, 10 times with his wife and less often alone, Prince Philip – who died Friday at age 99 – crossed many oceans to reach a collection of islands so distant from British monarchy a few kilometers further and he would find himself on his way back.

The first time, in the summer of 1953-1954, his wife Elizabeth was not only the newly crowned Queen, but also a mother of two.

Preparations, despite being offset by the Tangiwai tragedy – Prince Philip will lay wreaths at a mass funeral for victims of the Christmas Eve disaster – go far beyond digging up pregnant women.

Sheep tinged with Union Jack colors, sails erected to block tired buildings and armies of children in freshly sewn clothes were dispatched to parks, squares and train stations across the country.

The Queen and Prince Philip wave as the Royal chariot leaves Hastings in 1954.Photo / File
The Queen and Prince Philip wave as the Royal chariot leaves Hastings in 1954.Photo / File

Rotorua girl Miriama Searancke, 13, was among them, walking into Arawa Park with thousands of players and spectators in her new red boots with the Crown and the initials ER on the side.

“Everyone comes to perform for the Queen,” Searancke told the Daily Post in 2018.

“It was amazing.”

The 38-day tour takes the couple to 46 major cities and 110 events, with three-quarters of the country thought to have seen a royal surge.

Like all of the couple’s official tours over the past seven decades of marriage, Prince Philip is usually in the background.

When Pat Jamieson joined the crowd chanting “We want the Queen” outside the Revington Hotel in Greymouth, he was sure he actually took the couple to the balcony.
after – in a moment of silence – shouting “I want Duke”.

The 11-year-old had shared a moment with the empress earlier in the day after running half a mile beside their car during a street parade, she later told the NZHistory Government website.

“The Duke of Edinburgh looked across and said, ‘If you run any further, you’ll explode.'”

Masterton met the Royal couple in 1954. Image of Prince Philip at right.  Photos / Files
Masterton met the Royal couple in 1954. Image of Prince Philip at right. Photos / Files

He’s known for his long list of blunt – and often outrageous – comments.

One, drawn up in a 1954 letter to Australian politician Sir Harold Hartley and unearthed last year, paints a different picture of the Duke of Edinburgh’s thinking about New Zealand and its inhabitants than one can get from spontaneous waves or the laying of wreaths.

Māori are treated in New Zealand like “museum objects and pets”, he wrote, and the country is a “perfect welfare state” that is “excessively regulated with little room for initiative”.

However, he was impressed by the exhibits of the Māori culture museum, a special interest after reading The Coming of the Māori by Sir Peter Buck / Te Rangi Hīroa (Ngāti Mutunga).

And her people are “universally charming and overall most caring,” he wrote.

Shearer Godfrey Bowen demonstrated handheld technique for Queen and Prince Philip at Napier during the 1953/54 tour.  Photos / Files
Shearer Godfrey Bowen demonstrated handheld technique for Queen and Prince Philip at Napier during the 1953/54 tour. Photos / Files

He would return two years later – alone – to appear after the Melbourne Olympics.

A decade after their first hugely successful New Zealand tour, the royal couple sailed to the Bay of Islands on Royal Yacht Britannia on Waitangi Day 1963, visiting ports across the country, including Nelson, where the Duke – whose flagship Duke of Edinburgh rewards program helped thousands of children young people rule a precious life
skills – visit the Outward Bound School in Anakiwa.

The Queen and Duke, along with young Prince Charles and Princess Anne, returned seven years later for James Cook’s bicentennial, during which they debuted with the royal “walkabout”.

The royal couple will return to the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch four years later, three years after that to mark the Queen’s Silver Celebration – considered by some to be the closest to the joy of a quarter of a century earlier – and, in 1981, a brief visit following the Heads of the Commonwealth Government conference through the trench .

It may have been brief, but the 1981 tour left the country with captivating memories of Ginette McDonald’s Lyn of Laughter speaking directly to royals at the Royal Variety Performance.

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McDonald’s, characterized by a no-bra outfit, blue jumpsuit, and wide Kiwi accent, won over the Duke when he commented on the royals opening the memorial pool at Laughter.

“The Queen doesn’t laugh at anything,” McDonald later told New Zealand Women’s Weekly.

“Prince Philip who is engaged to me. We met them after that and he mumbled something in my ear. He said he liked the sound of the ‘piddling’ pool.”

The next most notable visit came in 1990, when New Zealand marked 150 years since the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Auckland hosted the Commonwealth Games, with the Queen, Duke and their son Prince Edward in attendance.

The Queen and Prince Philip meet members of the New Zealand Team at their headquarters in Auckland, from left, Ross Blackman, Tom Schnackenberg and Dean Barker.  Photos / Files
The Queen and Prince Philip meet members of the New Zealand Team at their headquarters in Auckland, from left, Ross Blackman, Tom Schnackenberg and Dean Barker. Photos / Files

The couple’s last visit to New Zealand was in 2002, with the only fault being related to the faulty Daimler, who suffered a flat battery.

Daimler, which is only used for visiting heads of state, has a flat battery.

As the royal couple waits on their now stationary plane bound for Australia, airport workers have the embarrassing task of pushing the incapacitated car off course.

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Foreign companies are creating more jobs in Switzerland despite the pandemic | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) Switzerland remains an attractive location for foreign companies, creating more jobs last year than in 2019 – despite the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Swiss public television SRF and RTS have reported.

This content is published on April 9, 2021 – 09:25 April 9, 2021 – 09:25 SRF / RTS / ilj

Foreign companies accounted for 11% more jobs in 2020, bringing the total to nearly 1,200, even if the total number of companies moving to the country fell (by 9%), said the SRF. Over the next three years, they are expected to drive the creation of 3,500 jobs.

“The workforce is highly qualified, and taxation is lucrative and Switzerland is in the middle of Europe,” said External Links Jim Fitzgerald, director of Tiffin Metal at the SwissExternal link.

The company, which produces specialty metal solutions for various industries, decided to open its first branch outside the US in Schmitten, in the canton of Friborg.

Stability

These figures come at a time of general global economic woes caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The Swiss economy shrank 2.9% last year as a result of Covid-19, the worst annual contraction since the aftermath of the oil crisis in 1975. But officials are optimistic that the Swiss economy will recover.

Patrick Wermelinger, of Swiss Global Enterprise, Switzerland’s export promotion agency, said Switzerland’s stability had played a role.

‘In a year of crisis, stability, long-term planning, economic security play a more important role. This is in Switzerland’s favor. But we were surprised by how many new jobs were being created, ‘he told SRF.

Companies from China, the US and Germany create the most jobs.

Switzerland is also one of the few to have attracted more foreign investment in 2020, according to the SRF. Only Ireland is attracting more, the fDi Markets Financial Times report found.

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