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Fashion: You’ll love … | Daily Mail Online | Instant News


… Stephanie Sofokleous’ new neutral color

The sweater up its game with ruffles and contrast stitching Jumper, £ 100, sezane.com

The sweater up its game with Jumper’s contrast stitch ruffles and stitches, £ 100, sezane.com

Statement sleeves and a vintage touch - we love the Shirt, £ 70, aligne.co

Statement sleeves and a vintage twist – we love Shirt, £ 70, aligne.co

Statement shirt + knit top = your new look anywhere Sleeveless top, £ 60, shirt, £ 80, trousers, £ 100 and earrings, £ 40, uterque.com

Statement shirt + knit top = your new look anywhere Sleeveless top, £ 60, shirt, £ 80, trousers, £ 100 and earrings, £ 40, uterque.com

Good looking Bag and great price tag, £ 6, Primark shop

Good looking Bag and great price tag, £ 6, Primark shop

Soft and plump… The perfect pillowcase, £ 35, Samantha Homeware & Design, etsy.com

Soft and plump… The perfect pillowcase, £ 35, Samantha Homeware & Design, etsy.com

For fun tunes - anywhere!  Portable speaker, £ 70, Kreafunk, amara.com

For fun tunes – anywhere! Portable speaker, £ 70, Kreafunk, amara.com

Made for speed - and they look gorgeous too, Trainers, £ 295, zespa.fr

Made for speed – and they look gorgeous too, Trainers, £ 295, zespa.fr

Best shirtdress at an affordable price, £ 14.90, uniqlo.com

Best Shirtdress at a low price, £ 14.90, uniqlo.com

This weekend's goal won't let you down. Jumper, £ 58, boden.co.uk

This weekend’s goal will never let you down Jumper, £ 58, boden.co.uk

Connect to the chain trend with this pair of standout earrings, £ 3, George, asda.com

Link to a chain trend with this pair of standout earrings, £ 3, George, asda.com

New Season Dress Silhouette, £ 39.99, topshop.com

New season silhouette, £ 39.99, topshop.com

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NZ regulators issue a Bitcoin warning: Be prepared to lose all your money | Instant News


Business

Liam Dann sits drinking beer with finance minister Steven Joyce to talk about Bitcoin and the economy.

The Financial Markets Authority has issued an emphatically-spoken warning for the Kiwi to consider taking over cryptocurrency.

The watchdog provided his comments to the Herald following Bitcoin’s latest rollercoaster move – the digital currency’s value has fallen by about a third since Friday after doubling over the past month – and similar advice issued by its UK counterpart, the Financial Conduct Authority or FCA.

“New Zealanders considering buying cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, should be aware that this is a high-risk and highly volatile asset,” said an FMA spokesman.

“Cryptocurrency is not regulated in New Zealand and is often exploited by scammers and hackers.

“FMA shares FCA’s concern that some crypto exchanges promise high returns and customers must be prepared to lose all their money.

“Many foreign cryptocurrency exchanges are not regulated and operate exclusively online – without a connection to New Zealand. This makes it difficult to know who is offering, exchanging, buying or selling cryptocurrency”

If you are planning to buy cryptocurrency, you should at least ensure that the exchange is listed on the List of Financial Service Providers (FSPR), which gives you access to dispute resolution schemes, said an FMA spokesman.

“You should also check if the exchange keeps your New Zealand dollars in a trust account.”

While much of the narrative around Bitcoin has focused on the rollercoaster valuation of cryptocurrency, people buying any digital currency need to be aware of practical issues too, such as how easy it is to convert to fiat currency.

The $ 30 million Cryptopia theft, which involved a Christchurch-based cryptocurrency exchange operating globally, also highlighted that crypto deposits are not guaranteed – unlike most traditional currencies, where governments would normally step in either by law or political pressure if there was a big loss.

The liquidator from Grant Thornton, and the police, is still around try to parse what happened to the Cryptopia hack, which happened in January 2019.

3 things you need to know about cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin

• They are high risk and very volatile – prices can go up and down very quickly
• They are not regulated in New Zealand
Cryptocurrencies, crypto-exchanges, and the people who use them are often targets for hacks, online scams and scams

Source / FMA

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Hot houses: How do you keep your place cool this summer? | Instant News


Many homes in New Zealand are deeply saddened by the scorching heat of the summer. Photo / 123RF

Whether it’s see-through curtains or cool sheets, the Kiwi has long had its own tricks for cooling a hot home without air conditioning – now a researcher wants to hear more about it.

Many homes in New Zealand are deeply saddened by the scorching heat of the summer.

A recent NZ Stats survey of the 6,700 homes found 36 percent sat at 25C or more during the summer – and sometimes even above 30C – compared to a comfortable room range of 20C to 25C.

A third is also colder than 18C during winter – or below World Health Organization standards – something related to people renting less isolated homes and struggling to pay for their daily needs.

This winter’s “energy poverty” and its broad public health impacts have been a major focus of Dr Kimberley O’Sullivan’s research at the University of Otago.

“Much of that means we’re focusing on whether people can get warm enough in winter – but actually it means it’s pretty cool in summer too.”

He pointed out that six of New Zealand’s 10 warmest years have occurred in the past decade, and the country is experiencing more frequent and severe hot days, which come with their own implications for health and energy use.

“Over the last 20 years we also have fast absorption heat pumps, and more than half of New Zealand households with heat pumps have reported using them for cooling in the summer,” he said.

“So now households have a mechanism for active cooling – and a greater need to reduce home temperatures in the summer.”

In a recently launched study, supported by the Marsden Fund, he seeks to answer how not only the Kiwis regulate the flow of summer heat through their homes, but also how this changes over time.

“I’m specifically looking for the kind of knowledge that’s sometimes called knowledge – or what people know from experience,” he said, adding that it includes how Kiwis use sizes ranging from curtains to heat pumps.

“This year, I’m going to start with a postal survey of areas with more extreme summer weather to get initial answers to questions like how comfortable people are to find their home in the summer, if they try to adjust the temperature, does it change over time, and whether they think they know enough about the matter. “

He is eager to hear from several generations of the same family, and what advice has been passed down.

“I also want to make sure that we include Māori whānau, Māori have lived in Aotearoa the longest and will have wisdom to offer.”

Finally, this three-year project will collect temperature and relative humidity records using a data logger on a sample of homes, and how people use energy throughout the day of the week.

“As far as I know, these approaches have never been combined like this before to look at these questions – and they certainly haven’t been used like this in New Zealand,” he said.

“One thing that would be quite challenging in my opinion would be to usefully weave all the data back together to make one big story or image, integrating it all at the end in such a way that the number is greater than the parts.

“The sections as an individual study would all be useful, but I hope to do something extra by combining them.

“If we have a very good picture of what people know and do, as well as what they need to manage summer at home, then we may be able to adapt various suggestions and policies where they are needed.

“The aim is that it will help increase our resilience to climate change and improve public health and well-being.”

Three tips for keeping the house cool

Easy fix: Avoid the sun by covering the curtains and blinds. Open doors and windows in different rooms to circulate air through your home. Adjust the safety lock to keep the windows open when you go out.

Make a shadow: Plant deciduous trees to shade your home in the summer. They will let the sun in when they lose their leaves in winter. Install external window blinds – such as blinds, awnings or grilles. The roof or roof hanging over the north facing window blocks out the summer sunshine.

Use a fan: The fans on the table, floor and ceiling use significantly less energy than air conditioning. If you have a heat pump, try setting the fan alone with the window open.

– Source: GenLess

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Polar Bear Plunge plays host to help fight food insecurity | Instant News


Posted:
Updated:

RANKIN COUNTY, Nona (WJTV) – YMCA Reservoir held its annual Polar Plunge on Saturday and raised $ 1,000 dollars that will help fight food insecurity.

The organization says it increases during the pandemic to feed as much as they can, donating more than 55,000 meals by 2020. They say it is because 1 in 4 Mississippi children face food insecurity even before the pandemic.

More than 70 people took risks from all walks of life, even the smallest.

“It was so cold and as soon as I touched the water I felt as if I had done something wrong but after I warmed up I was very proud of myself,” said Leah Collipp.

That’s 37 degrees where the event took place. Many jumpers said it was the coldest year ever. Participants do plunge in a pool as a substitute for an ordinary reservoir in order to maintain social distancing.

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New Zealand’s best beaches – how to nominate your favorites | Instant News


Wainui Beach, Gisborne. Photo / J Dobson

Don’t miss your chance to nominate your favorite stretch of sand in our search for New Zealand’s Best Beaches 2021

We’re looking for the best beaches in New Zealand and we need your help. We want you to nominate your favorites, tell us why you love this beach and what makes it so special. Send us a photo of your favorite beach, too, and we’ll profile some of your entries over the summer. But hurry up, the nominations close at midnight [Sunday, January 10].

From there, your entries will be counted and the top 10 beaches will be named as our finalists, with the bonus of three wildcard entries chosen by the Herald Travel team.
You can then select one beach from the top 13 beaches to be crowned the ultimate winner.

Meanwhile, here are some of the nominees so far. Don’t see your favorite here? Vote below, or open nzherald.co.nz/bestbeach

May the best beaches win!

Matarangi Beach, Coromandel

This is one of the few beaches that are truly north facing in New Zealand with fine white sand, beautiful clear water. There is a wide variety of sea conditions for all – young shallow swimmers, ocean swimmers, boogie boarders, surfers, kite surfers, paddle surfers. The beach is never overcrowded and apart from that you can often see dolphins passing by.
Sally Waters

Kaiteriteri Beach, Nelson Tasman

I think Kaiteriteri beach is one of the best in New Zealand, known for its unique golden sand and crystal clear waters. An ideal and popular summer spot, it has everything you need for an action-packed day, from sailing, kayaking, bicycle tours and more. Even better, Kaiteriteri has more beautiful and unique beaches that are all located next to each other.
Yulan Black

Aramoana, Dunedin

Pumps up the surf, there’s awesome wildlife (sea lions and penguins) and some really cool cliffs and rocks.
Felix Page

Bark Bay, Abel Tasman National Park

It’s secluded (you have to get there by hiking or by boat), has a sloping white sand beach, with clear, sheltered sea water and deep enough to swim. It’s also supported by a national park, so it’s 99 percent natural.
Zoe Cromwell

Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland

Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland.  Photo / John Anggot
Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland. Photo / John Anggot

Mangawhai is truly magical because the sunsets are amazing, you can surf, you can walk on the cliffs to see amazing bird’s eye views from places that cannot be caught on camera, there is local dune protection. Everyone must experience the Mangawhai miracle.

John Anggot

Cable Bay in Doubtless Bay, Northland

There’s an ice cream shop there, golden sand, blue water, happy people – the perfect place.
Parry Jay

Ruakaka, Northland

Ruakaka Beach, Northland.  Photo / Koby Jonas
Ruakaka Beach, Northland. Photo / Koby Jonas

Soft white sand and clear clear water that stretches for miles make this beach our favorite. Ice cream in “the chilly bin” after a day in the sun is a bonus.
Koby Jonas

Campbells Bay, Kakanui, Waitaki

Campbell Bay, Waitaki.  Photo / Sarah Hailes
Campbell Bay, Waitaki. Photo / Sarah Hailes

It’s great for families, surfers, and dog-friendly. This can keep you busy or treat you as your only friend. Take a walk to All Day Bay and back, or try a small kite. I like it.
Sarah Hailes

Matapouri Beach, Northland

Matapouri Beach, Northland.  Photo / Mark Gibson
Matapouri Beach, Northland. Photo / Mark Gibson

This beach has soft sand, warm water, and small waves perfect for swimming and body boarding. Ample parking makes it easy to prepare for a long day at the beach.
Anushree Sen Gupta

Kano Beach, on Mapoutahi in Otago

Canoe Beach has it all – beautiful for a walk with your dog, caves to walk through at low tide, rope swings, history, pā to hike and watch surfers, lovely long beaches to walk along the other side of the headland. Kano Beach is also great for swimming as it’s sheltered – you can kayak around to Osborne bay, and now there’s even a local brewery in Waitati. Nothing is missing.
Amanda Church

Wainui Beach, Gisborne

Wainui not only greets the sun before anywhere else on mainland New Zealand, it also has a fun and nurturing community, incredible waves and beautiful clear water. There is a rock pool at each end with interesting creatures. The Okitu shop, about half way down, has excellent summer food and the most friendly staff.
J Dobson

Castlepoint, Wairarapa

Castlepoint is a superb coastal formation with a variety of coastal experiences. Wild surfing and calm and safe lagoons. Stunning rock forms, lighthouses and sand dunes. Great fishing, swimming, surfing and kayaking. Stunning views and walking opportunities. Sitting under the lighthouse after dark is also a real experience. This is an authentic Kiwi beach and bach environment, with an annual horse race on the beach.
Melissa de Souza-Correa

Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay

Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay.  Photo / Patel Veerick
Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay. Photo / Patel Veerick

Wharariki only cut Mataī Bay and Castlepoint Northland for me. The three of them were very beautiful. But Wharariki won because it had exposed rocks like Cathedral Cove, providing a unique sight to behold. Has a rock pool for baby seals to swim and play. The distance is far away, which adds to its charm. There is plenty of room for multiple people to enjoy at once. Good surf. You need to take a short walk to access it, which might be considered negative, but people who tend to make an effort to reach it are less likely to litter and wreck the place. There are lots of walks, which can also expose you to a variety of wildlife.
Patel Veerick

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel.  Photo / Mahdi Algargoosh
Cathedral Cove, Coromandel. Photo / Mahdi Algargoosh

Cathedral Cove is a slice of heaven. There are stunning walks to the beach, pristine clear water, waves and waterfalls. It doesn’t get much better than this.
Mahdi Algargoosh |

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