Tag Archives: zoology

PET TALK: Traveling safely with animals | Free | Instant News


Pet owners who choose to travel the country while following appropriate precautions during and after the Covid-19 pandemic may be concerned about leaving their pets at home. While transporting a pet across the country can seem daunting, with the right planning, owners need to be sure they can take their furry friend where they need to go. Christine Rutter, clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, says pet owners should notify their airline, accommodation, and veterinarian of their intention to travel with their pet as soon as possible. Owners should also contact the proper authorities to make sure their pet has the proper documentation. “Technically, any transport of an animal across national borders requires a USDA health certificate issued by a USDA certified veterinarian,” Rutter said. It’s best to check the specific requirements of your destination to make sure you’re in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations when you arrive. When obtaining the appropriate documentation from your veterinarian, owners should ensure their pet is up to date on all vaccinations, heartworm prevention, prevention of ectoparasites (such as fleas and ticks) , has a chip registered with current contact information, and a legible tag on their collar or harness. Tags should include the animal’s name, an emergency phone number, and any relevant medical information. “If your pet is given medication every day, make sure you have enough to last your entire trip and ask your vet if it’s worth having a hard copy of the prescriptions. in case the drugs are lost, ”said Rutter. Pet owners who use a medical device, such as a blood glucose monitor or pacemaker, should speak to their veterinarian about available resources near their destination. If your pet is suffering from anxiety or motion sickness, ask your vet how to best meet his needs while traveling. “A lot of our pets don’t live very exciting lives when it comes to travel, so the hustle and bustle of travel can come as a real shock,” said Rutter. “A few weeks before traveling, familiarize your animal with the crate or carrier in which it will be traveling. Hiding treats or feeding your pet in the carrier, providing a comfortable bed in the carrier, and taking short car trips in the carrier can help make the travel experience less scary. Rutter also recommends keeping your pet in a travel crate or carrier when unattended in a new environment. This keeps your pet from messing around and ensures your pet is in a safe and familiar place.Owners can also help create a familiar environment for their pet by using the same litter their cat uses at home when of his travels, and nurturing them consistently. diet. Avoiding the introduction of new foods and treats during travel can also reduce the risk of digestive incidents.More importantly, Rutter recommends that pet owners anticipate their four-legged friend’s needs and prepare for emergencies. . This includes carrying garbage bags, water, urgent medication, and at least a small portion of your pet’s food. Owners should also be aware of the pet rescue areas at the airport, if any. Owners may wish to research where local emergency vet centers are along their route or near their destination. They may also wish to purchase pet insurance for their pet and should keep their policy handy when traveling. If possible, include insurance information on your pet’s collar or harness tag.Finally, Rutter reminds owners that their furry friend may behave differently when exposed to travel stressors. Make sure your pet wears a collar or harness with a tag at all times during the trip in case of an escape attempt. Fearful animals can bite as well, so give your pet plenty of time to acclimate to new environments before challenging them to encounter new people and other animals, and make sure they are properly supervised. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be found on the Pet Talk website. Suggestions for future topics can be addressed to [email protected] .



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Inkom Girl Wins Idaho Wool Industry Fashion Competition | Local | Instant News


INKOM – Learning to sew is a birthright for women in Ariana Long’s family.

Long, a 16 year old Inkom girl who attended Century High School in Pocatello, was taught sewing by her mother, Kristi Bernier-Long, when she was only 7 years old. Bernier-Long, on the other hand, learned from his mother, who also learned from his mother.

The family legacy is in good hands with Long, who was recently told that the red wool coat he designed and created took first place in the state in the annual Make it With Wool contest, sponsored by the Idaho Wool Growers Association.

The coat – made of 100% Pendleton wool with lining, collar, black belt, clasp front and shaped trim – will now be entered in the American Sheep Industry Association national competition. If it weren’t for the COVID-19 pandemic, Long would have been invited to Denver to participate directly in national competitions.

Long, who won the junior division of the competition, admitted that he was nervous about entering the coat in the contest. This was the first time he had worked with wool and made changes himself, without his mother’s help.

“It means a lot to me personally,” Long said. “This is one of the first outfits I can do myself and be convinced of my talent.”

Over the years, Long has sewn her own pajamas and several dresses, including semi-formal 1950s-style dresses. For the coat design, he modified McCall’s pattern.

“I added a few different personal accessories and styles,” Long said.

Lama previously modeled the coat during the 4H competition at the Eastern Idaho State Fair, where he won a medal in the style review category.

Long is the representative for the eastern 4H district and has been active in 4H and FFA for several years.

“I saw a lot of people showing sheep (in 4H) and I have been exposed to the wool industry through that program,” said Long, who hopes to have a career as a major veterinarian. “I’ve done a lot of learning about the animals featured in 4H and their respective industries.”

Long personally participated in a race featuring a horse and his dog, the German shepherd.

For winning the state contest, he was awarded a full fleece and 10 yards of wool for his future project. He explained that he used thick, hard-to-work wool for his coat, and that it would be easier to work with lighter wool in the future.

He was so desperate to get the coat back from the national appraisal that he ended up wearing it regularly.

Idaho Make it with Wool Director Kim Monk said the contest was meant to promote the quality and versatility of wool and has been around for decades. She looked at photos dating from the 1940’s of entries from Latah County in the Idaho state pageant.

Monk personally won the Idaho contest as a student in the 1980s. He earned a master’s degree in textile design from the University of Idaho.

“Wool as a fiber is very versatile. Wool is a natural fiber; it’s very sustainable,” says Monk.

Monk said he was impressed with all the entries in this year’s contest, including Long’s coat.

“It’s so beautiful. I want it,” he said.

Mia Sharnhost, from Genesee, took second place in the junior division.

There are 230,000 sheep raised in Idaho, and the herd has grown by 5% over the past two years, said Naomi Gordon, executive director of the Idaho Wool Growers Association. Gordon emphasized that wool has antimicrobial properties and is good for human health and the environment.

“Fine wool is one of the finest fabrics you will find in the entire world,” says Gordon.

Gordon says proponents of using natural fibers tend to prefer wool, which he says “has had a bad reputation in the past from people who don’t understand the product.”

As well as clothing, Gordon said wool was used in brick making, as an insulator in computers and in fire-resistant uniforms.

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Burdened by pandemic curbs, demand for sustainable food grows | Local Business News | Instant News


At the start of the pandemic, health workers were showered with gift baskets, parades, joyous roadside signs and impressive F-16 fly-bys at the hospital. However, those expressions of gratitude have faded and been hospitalized as COVID-19 and virus-related deaths continued. As Jake Henry Jr., president and CEO of Saint Francis Health Systems, noted, these frontline heroes were “exhausted after wearing personal protective gear to repeatedly busy 12-hour shifts. “When they got into the car and came home, they were completely exhausted,” Henry said. “When they enter into unmasked apathy in public places – shops, restaurants and public gatherings – they feel defeated.”

Read more about why we honor local health care workers as Tulsans of the Year.

Photo above: Frontline worker James Burns, RN, BSN, Saint Francis Health Systems (left); Head of the Tulsa Fire Service Michael Baker; Head of the Department of Health’s Division of Prevention, Preparedness and Response, Tulsa Kelly VanBuskirk; Respiratory Therapist Brittany Ullrich from Ascension St. John Medical Center; Tulsa Health Department Executive Director Bruce Dart; Kayla Stack, EMSA medic and recipient of the 2020 Star of Life award; Guy Sneed, chief medical officer of the Hillcrest HealthCare System; Nick Coffman, EMSA paramedic; Kelsey Two Bears, a certified physician assistant at the Sapulpa Indian Health Center of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health, stands outside the Tulsa Central Library.

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From farm to table: The pandemic is driving consumers towards more food security | Local Business News | Instant News


At the start of the pandemic, health workers were showered with gift baskets, parades, joyous roadside signs and impressive F-16 fly-bys at the hospital. However, those expressions of gratitude have faded and been hospitalized as COVID-19 and virus-related deaths continued. As Jake Henry Jr., president and CEO of Saint Francis Health Systems, noted, these frontline heroes were “exhausted after wearing personal protective gear to repeatedly busy 12-hour shifts. “When they got into the car and came home, they were completely exhausted,” Henry said. “When they enter into unmasked apathy in public places – shops, restaurants and public gatherings – they feel defeated.”

Read more about why we honor local health care workers as Tulsans of the Year.

Photo above: Frontline worker James Burns, RN, BSN, Saint Francis Health Systems (left); Head of the Tulsa Fire Service Michael Baker; Tulsa Health Department Head of Prevention, Preparedness and Response Division Kelly VanBuskirk; Respiratory Therapist Brittany Ullrich from Ascension St. John Medical Center; Tulsa Health Department Executive Director Bruce Dart; Kayla Stack, EMSA medic and recipient of the 2020 Star of Life award; Guy Sneed, chief medical officer of the Hillcrest HealthCare System; Nick Coffman, EMSA paramedic; Kelsey Two Bears, a certified physician assistant at the Sapulpa Indian Health Center of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health, stands outside the Tulsa Central Library.

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Barking in the Adventure: Oklahoma Firefighter and Dog Travel the Globe on “The Pack” Entertainment | Instant News



I think it was three months after I got Kepo my neighbor’s dog walked into my yard and killed my oldest dog so I just got Kepo which was a good thing I got him have had. It kind of filled that void and made us, our bond, stronger. He was a dog good enough that we just got along … and continued to do what I loved to do with dogs and watch them work, allowing them to have a job that they love. , which is United Blood Trackers. We track injured game here in Oklahoma, which was just legalized three or four years ago. He likes that. He’s good at it. I like it and I like to watch him work, then he also works cattle. He’s got some work to do, so there’s a pretty good connection between you and Kepo? We had a good bond before and then going on the show allowed us to be together 24 hours a day, seven days a week, all the time we were gone. We were always with each other, which made him feel a lot stronger. It used to be strong, but the more time you spend with a dog, the better your bond will be. You are going to teach each other. Your dog will learn what you want versus what you don’t want. If you don’t spend time with them, the dog is right there. Looks like the show was one hell of an adventure? .



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