Trip status changed from ‘red’ to ‘orange’ | Local News | Instant News


GREENSBURG – Effective 8:00 Thursday, April 9, travel status in Decatur County has been changed from “red” to “orange” by the Decatur County Commissioner.

The orange status means “watch” applies to local traffic; his condition “threatens public safety,” according to the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (www.in.gov/dhs/traveladvisory).

As long as travel advisors are “on guard”, only important trips, such as to and from work or in emergency situations, are recommended, and emergency action plans must be implemented by businesses, schools, government agencies, and other organizations.

The county “orange” status will remain in effect for seven days; ended at 11:59 p.m. on April 20 to coincide with Governor Holcomb’s Executive Order 20-18.

“I encourage many of our better social distance numbers,” said Decatur County Commissioner Rick Nobbe. Referring to the cellphone usage metrics recently, he continued, “Last week, before we became ‘red’ (emergency status), we got an ‘F’ rating and we are now at ‘B minus.’ May we make some progress this week when we go to Orange, as the governor wishes, but I want people to understand that this isn’t over. We still have to be very careful and practice all the social distance we have done. “

Under the county “orange” status, outside sports such as walking, biking, or jogging are permitted provided that it is done alone or with a member of your closest household.

10 nights to 5 pm takes effect April 2, it still applies, and the use of public playgrounds is prohibited.

Those diagnosed with COVID-19 who are not treated in a health care facility must quarantine themselves as much as possible and limit their contact with others who live in the same residence. Anyone who lives or is exposed to someone newly diagnosed with COVID-19 should contact the Decatur District Health Department hotline at 812-560-5450.

When traveling for official purposes, individuals must maintain a social warning of available distances including proper cleanliness and a distance of six feet from other individuals, and must travel as the sole occupant of their vehicle unless the vehicle requires more than one person to operate or the driver transports one passenger to their workplaces in important businesses.

Businesses that choose to remain open to the public must designate with signs and reinforcing tape six feet away where the customer line occurs, must make hand sanitizers available to their customers and employees, and must display signs directing customers to conduct business through telephone or online. as the preferred business mode.

Every business must track the number of people entering and leaving a store, and the “one-in, one-out” practice must be maintained when the capacity for safe social distance is exceeded. Customers must be given the choice to call in advance to place an order, and must be offered a roadside pickup and payment capability. Only one adult per household is permitted to enter the business at a time, and minors and dependents must be accompanied by one adult.

Direct purchases must be postponed until they are needed for food, health, education or work.

All direct visits to retail companies must limit the number and frequency of such visits.

All individuals must limit the number of household members who travel and enter shops or other important businesses.

The social distance protocol (“six foot rule”) remains, in accordance with the Governor’s Executive Order 20-18.

All law enforcement agencies in Decatur Regency will enforce orders issued by Governor Holcomb, Decatur Regency Commissioner, and mayor of Greensburg.

Unintentional, known or intentional violations of this order or Governor Holcomb’s Order 20-18 order are minor Class B violations, which can be punished up to 180 days in the Decatur District Prison and fines of up to $ 1,000.

The order was completed by saying that the commissioner was aware of the difficulties and sacrifices of this action, and indicated the restriction would be reviewed as a change in COVID-19 circumstances which were deemed appropriate.

Concerned about Decatur County being identified as a COVID-19 “hot spot,” the commissioners declared a red “travel advisory,” the highest level of emergency available, on April 2.

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