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USA TODAY The Netherlands Heffernan must prepare 36 rooms at the Sunburst Motel for a full house this weekend. Instead, he spent Monday crossing out 36 checks, returning money for deposit guests down in January to stay on Memorial Day weekend at Seaside Heights in Jersey. Beach. The beach and parts of the boardwalk have reopened, but the motel, which was sold out, discovered at the last minute that it could not yet be opened under local lodging restrictions. “Sorry, but this is something out of our control,” Heffernan told guests when he delivered the news to them by telephone. Karen Oliver, a research chemist from the Bahamas, North Carolina, had to map the hike and main photo site in Glacier National Park in Montana for a June trip with her husband, the couple postponed the trip last week after United canceled one of their flights and the cabin they planned would keep changing its opening date. “It feels a bit too early to leave,” he said. the annual summer begins, holidays on Friday amid a corona virus pandemic, travelers and businesses serving them face unprecedented uncertainty, chaos and concern.The main attractions and vacation destinations remain closed, orders remain at home and travel restrictions are still spread, and some potential travelers worry about viruses and people ban yak or postpone new safety measures, including mandatory face masks on airplanes. Add a steep loss of work and the question becomes: Is summer vacation canceled this year? The outlook is so bleak AAA threw away this year’s Memorial Day annual forecast for the first time in 20 years. All car club officials and travel agents can offer that holiday weekend travel volumes will be weak. Last year, AAA projected that 43 million Americans would travel over a long weekend, the second highest on record. “With social distance guidelines still in practice, the volume of travel this holiday weekend is likely to set a record low,” Paula Twidale, AAA senior vice president of travel, said in a statement. There is a glimmer of hope that travel demand is increasing, especially for last minute travel, because restrictions are easing in several states and airlines, hotels, vacation rentals, car rental companies, cruise lines and places of interest carry out enhanced security measures. Considering whether to travel? Here’s what you should know and consider as Southwest’s CEO: There is no evidence that people will not travel. Autoplay Show Thumbnails. Show Text. Last Slide. SlideSouthwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly did not remove the summer. He said there was no evidence, beyond estimating gloomy travel trends since the outbreak began, that “people will not travel for holidays.” The airline has “decent bookings” for July, he told Wall Street analysts at the end of April, and June bookings went ahead of the muted expectations the airline said in the filing of Tuesday’s effects. Southwest, which launched a full month fee sale in mid-May last week, expects to fill 35 to 45% of seats in June, compared to 8% in April. Delta and United also expressed optimism, with Delta saying it added back 100 more flights than expected in June. The big question, the airline says, is whether travelers stay with the plan or cancel their trips as has happened en masse on all airlines since the pandemic began. Louisville mother on the fence: “This virus is very strange that you do not know what will happen” Heen Keeney-Klump is on the fence. The Louisville teacher was supposed to visit Madeira Beach, Florida, in mid-July for a week, his family’s first beach vacation in four years. His biological father, with whom he reunited last year, organized a family reunion of 20 people and booked tickets at Southwest and a beachfront condo for high school special education teachers, her husband, and a 6-year-old son. They had talked about visiting Legoland Florida and doing a big boat tour with the whole group. The trip is still almost two months away, but the more it looks they will not leave. Keeney-Klump is worried about viruses, especially the latest reports about inflammatory diseases related to COVID that affect children. He oversees trends in Kentucky, where he lives, and Florida. “This virus is very strange so you do not know what will happen,” he said. “We are really in waters that are not known for all this.” The rest of the group plans to leave no matter what, he said, but the Louisville family will make their decision on July 1. “If I had to decide today, I would say we won’t go, ‘”he said. The family had discussed driving 13 hours instead of flying to Florida, but that brought its own challenges including two nights at a roadside hotel.” We have brainstormed ways to make it work, ” he said. “But somewhat conscious in the end, maybe not.” “Are we disappointed by that? Correct. This is a great opportunity to not only have a beautiful beach vacation but also reconcile … with this side of my family, ” he said. “If it doesn’t happen this summer, it can happen next summer hopefully.” Kelly said the reopening of the country, especially tourist attractions, national parks, restaurants and other things that tourists crave, will be a big determinant in what about summer business? “That will leave tourists in a position where they can be more confident that,” Hey, I can go somewhere nice and there will be something to do when I get there, “he said. Kelly uses his family as an example of what he sees as a hidden travel request. “They are determined that we will go to the beach in July for a holiday, and I must believe that we are one of many,” he said. “It remains to be seen whether it is will come true or not. “Any repairs will be welcomed for the battered aviation industry, which has landed more than half of its aircraft, cut flights and warned of layoffs. But executives warned that it was too early to draw any conclusions from their early summer bookings or the Transportation Safety Administration data showed a steady increase in the number of passengers traveling through airport checkpoints as they recovered from historic lows. The number of passengers is still down by more than 90%. “We are still a small part of where we are supposed to be at this time of the year,” Delta Finance Chief of Staff Paul Jacobson said in an investor presentation Tuesday. Michael, New Hampshire traveling should not go for the New Jersey family: ‘I think it adds anxiety. Keith Cook has already decided about summer vacation, he canceled two summer vacations planned earlier this month to avoid the cancellation sentence. The assistant dean of the university, who lives in New Jersey with his teacher’s wife and 4-year-old daughter, should have spent several a night on the water in Traverse City, Michigan, in mid-July with his brother’s family, followed by an annual cousin trip in late July, this year to Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire Water sports, beach time, fishing, hiking, amusement park rides, and dinner is all on the agenda, the problem is, Cook said: They don’t know what will open or what kind of social break on the beach when crowds flock to the beach along the East Coast when they have opened. Another concern with Michigan is traveling in a “closed environment” on a plane. Cook often flies but worries about flying with small children. Bottom line: They don’t want to be stressed and have to be on their feet every turn. “That thought adds to the anxiety, ” he said.” The reality is our idea of ​​a family vacation is to go and have fun, pull it off. ” The hotel business is ticking: ‘Guests are starting to want to feel normal’ Like airlines, hotels are starting to see a slight increase in business Statistics from the STR industry tracker show that occupancy is increasing gradually every week, from 21% in early April to 32.4% last week Claudia Ludlow, general manager of the Glorietta Bay Inn which consists of 100 rooms across the street from the award-winning Coronado Beach in Coronado, California, said bookings failed miserably in April. This historic hotel is at a 10% occupancy rate in April, approaching 60% for Memorial Day weekend and almost sold out for the 4th of July weekend. This hotel gets the biggest percentage of summer visitors. from neighboring Arizona, where residents are only 5 ½ hours away from the beach and resting from three-digit temperatures at home. “Guests are starting to want to feel normal,” he said. line, Lud Low said he felt more like a therapist than a hotel manager. “Desperation to escape is really itchy for them,” he said. Heffernan said his adult son, who helped at Sunburst in the summer, told him to focus on July and August because May was a loner, and it was unclear what would be allowed in June even though three are sold out on weekends. This motel is only open from May to October. “He said, ‘Dad, you can end up with the best summer ever. … these people are going crazy. They must get out, ” said Heffernan. Heffernan, who opened the motel in 1984 and passed through the effects of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, believes July and August will be “good.” tourists remain nervous about the crowd. “They worry about being around a group of strangers, so who knows what to expect? ” He said. The family hopes for a resort vacation – if the budget allows Amy Spaulding, a corporate event planner in southern California, is eyeing a summer visit to the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess resort. luxury in Arizona. California has recently extended home stay orders until July, and desert vacations with swimming pools and exciting restaurants, he said. “The idea of ​​going to Nevada or Arizona to be able to jump in the pool and go eat and really having some freedom and enjoyment sounds really great, “he said. Airplane tickets aren’t needed, and summer room rates are a fraction of the peak season prices because of the burning heat. However, a Scottsdale vacation might be out of budget this year. His business has dried up because of business has canceled meetings and special events for the future. “I don’t have an income now, “he said. Spaulding, who is married to a teenage daughter, said the family tried to be careful with money so that it might end up staying at home. They were fortunate to have taken a family vacation to New York City and the Caribbean in January before a coronavirus outbreak arrived in the US. “We are rather lucky,” he said. Boat operators rely on local demand as easy easing. Jerry MacRae, founder and CEO of the Hornblower Group, whose 200 ships operate sightseeing tours, dining cruises, ferries and river cruises around the country, is very optimistic about the summer of 2020. The San Francisco company generates two-thirds of its business between June and September so it needs to run the ship as soon as possible. With the national park reopening, the company hopes to soon resume popular cruise tours to Alcatraz Island in San Francisco and the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island in New York. “They are on the horizon,” he said. “They are no longer limited. ” MacRae thinks city boat tours will take place ahead of the high-class dinner cruise, especially from local residents and regional visitors who are getting closer to home.” “People in the Chicago area, when they can, they will rush to the Navy Pier, and they will rush to the River (Chicago),” he said. “I think the last few times (when travel requests dropped) we called it staycation. I don’t know what the term is this time.” AutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideMacRae said the benchmark for 2020 will not be profitable. The company counted 30 million passengers last year and won’t. “It’s approaching this year. International travelers, the main source of business, are already out of the mix due to continued travel restrictions.” It will be very difficult to get profits this year, “he said. “Only survival will feel good. ” The prospect of international travel: See when popular destinations reopen their borders. European holiday, but road travel continues. With their children coming out of college, 2020 will be a year of great travel. for Oliver and her husband, Tony.In addition to the Glacier National Park trip, they had two tickets to Germany in April.The cancellation of the airline flight also disrupted the trip.Other trips, to Oak Island, North Carolina, in July were still ongoing. and they lived in a beach hut with other family members for a reunion he had attended since he was 16. They were not sure about the beach or other boundaries but were not afraid it would ruin their plans. “I think if we can’t do too much in beach, we can see the ocean, ” he said. “We are quite prepared for this trip and feel very comfortable with this one.” The only thing that coronavirus has changed about travel is a new layer of advance preparation for this holiday. ” Our planning is usually where we will go anyway and what path we will climb. Now it becomes: Can we even go, and what do we need to think about, such as food and supplies? ” Oliver has combed the Oak Island website for information about restrictions and reopening phases and finding reminders about the potential shortages of grocery store staples. “OK, that means toilet paper, so it will definitely be something we have to think about,” he said. After Oak Island, the couple is scheduled to visit Isle Royale National Park in Michigan in August. Oliver has overseen plans to reopen the seasonal park and got bad news this week: ferry services and lodging in the park will not open this season. “If not this time, then we will rain check, ” he said. Avoiding plane ticket offers to Canada, but not clicking buy – but Dwight Stockham continues to oversee flight deals between Albuquerque, New Mexico and Winnepeg, Canada, and has seen several summer offers that have been screaming lately, usually running around $ 600 round trip for $ 340, he said Stockock, a half-retired engineer, returned to Canada, where he was raised and his brothers and other relatives were still alive, every summer for two to four weeks for vacation. He retains dual citizenship. “I only return in the summer because winter is too cold,” he said. “55 below is too cold.” But he still hasn’t clicked on buying on the United Airlines website. Stockham said he was worried about getting a refund if he could not travel and did not know what to expect in the event of a crisis quarantine or other restrictions. Presidents Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, this week extended the closure of land borders until June 22. “I will wait until I hear more,” he said. If he doesn’t go to Canada, it will be the first time in 45 years. Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide Slide Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/news/2020/05/21/summer-vacation-amid-coronavirus-will- travel-bust-or-surprise / 5190461002 /



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